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Robotic surgery appears to be as effective as open surgery in treating

By on July 20, 2019

first_imgJun 22 2018The first comprehensive study comparing the outcomes of robotic surgery to those of traditional open surgery in any organ has found that the surgeries are equally effective in treating bladder cancer. The seven-year study, conducted at 15 institutions, including Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, and directed by Dipen J. Parekh, M.D., chair of urology and director of robotic surgery at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, is published in the June 23 issue of The Lancet.The Randomized Open Versus Robotic Cystectomy (RAZOR) trial showed lower blood loss and blood transfusion rates and shorter hospital stays for patients who received minimally invasive surgery, but there were no differences in complication rates and the two-year progression-free survival was nearly the same.”We have done more than 4 million surgeries with the robotic approach since the device came into existence, and on average we do close to a million robotic surgeries a year globally,” said Parekh, who is chief clinical officer of the University of Miami Health System. “There are close to 5,000 robotic systems installed all over the world – each one costs about $2 million – and yet until we did this study there was not a single Phase 3 multicenter randomized trial comparing this expensive new technology to the traditional open approach of doing surgeries.”A total of 350 patients were involved in the bladder cancer study. Half received the open surgical approach and half received robotic surgery, and they were followed for two to three years so that outcomes could be compared.”No one had followed these patients over a period of time to find out if you are impacting their cancer outcomes with this robotic approach,” Parekh said. “We were able to prove unequivocally that we are not compromising patient outcomes by using robotic surgery.”The most important lesson from the study, Parekh said, is that more trials should be done, on other organs. “It is possible to do well-designed Phase 3 multicenter surgical trials comparing new technology and surgical innovations to traditional ones before proclaiming superiority or success of one over the other,” he said. “There’s a steep cost to robotic technology, and there is a learning curve, so we need to build on this in terms of making rational, data-based decisions.”Related StoriesNew research links “broken heart syndrome” to cancerGender biases are extremely common among health care professionalsTen-fold rise in tongue-tie surgery for newborns ‘without any real strong data’Patients will also have more solid information as a result of this study and future research, Parekh said. “The patients will ask better questions, and the physicians for the first time will be able to answer these questions, based on data rather than based on intuition. This is the highest level of data one can get.”There has been an assumption that patients who receive robotic surgery will perceive a better quality of life than patients who have open surgery. Patients participating in the RAZOR study were asked about their quality of life at three and six months after surgery, and while both groups reported a significant return to their previous quality of life, there was no advantage of one group over the other.Some critics of robotic surgery have expressed concern about the lack of tactile feedback – an important guide in open surgery. “When you do robotic surgery you don’t feel anything,” Parekh said. “It’s more by visual cues. If you’re doing open surgery you have the organs in your hands, you can feel them, and you assess and do these surgeries accordingly.”Parekh has extensive experience performing robotic surgeries with the da Vinci Xi Surgical System at UHealth Tower. It provides a magnified, three-dimensional view of the organs, and a wide range of motion and flexibility. Robotic surgery has become particularly popular with prostate cancer patients – 90 percent of them choose it – which would make it difficult if not impossible to do a randomized study of surgical results in prostate cancer. But Parekh says that because robotic surgery is being used in many other organs, including kidney, colorectal, OB/GYN and lung cancer, more studies are needed.And while there are improvements in perioperative recovery with robotic technology, operating room time is significantly longer for robotic surgery.”The findings of this study provide high-level evidence to inform a discussion between patients and their physicians regarding the benefits and risks of various approaches for a complex and often morbid surgery, like radical cystectomy,” the trial description says. “It also underscores the need for further high-quality trials to critically evaluate surgical innovation prior to adoption into practice.”Source: http://med.miami.edu/news/first-major-study-comparing-robotic-to-open-surgery-published-in-lancetlast_img read more

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ADHA applauds federal agencies that update Surgeon Generals Report on oral health

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first_imgAug 2 2018The American Dental Hygienists’ Association (ADHA) applauds the federal agencies that will be involved in updating the Surgeon General’s Report on oral health. This update will document progress in oral health over the last 20 years and create a vision for the future.The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced the update on July 27 and is working alongside several federal agencies to commission this Surgeon General’s Report.The original Surgeon General’s Report on oral health was first released in 2000 and evaluated the link between oral health and overall well-being. The updated report will further assess how poor oral health affects physical and economic well-being, how oral health care is often treated as a supplemental benefit and more.ADHA commends these efforts to update the nation on key issues in oral health and will continue to support the updated report as it is developed. Source:http://www.adha.org/resources-docs/Surgeon_Generals_Report_Press_Release.pdflast_img read more

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Study identifies distinct genetic mutations in appendix cancer that may impact treatment

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first_img Source:https://ucsdnews.ucsd.edu/pressrelease/genetic_mutations_of_appendix_cancer_identified_may_impact_treatment Aug 9 2018The rarity of appendix cancer, accounting for less than 1 percent of tumors that originate in the gastrointestinal tract, and the lack of scientific data for this disease means that current treatment guidelines recommend applying therapies to people with appendix cancer that are intended for those with colon cancer.To understand why some patients with appendix cancer respond to standard treatment while others do not, University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center researchers, in collaboration with Foundation Medicine, performed genetic profiling on 703 appendiceal tumors — the largest such study of this disease to date — to compare mutations present in both cancer types.The findings, published online August 8 in JCO Precision Oncology, confirm that genetic mutations in appendix cancer are distinct from those found in colon cancer and that mutations in the genes TP53 and GNAS are good predictors of survival among people with appendix cancer.Related StoriesNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancerStudy: Nearly a quarter of low-risk thyroid cancer patients receive more treatment than necessaryGenetic contribution to distractibility helps explain procrastination”For tumors that are rare like appendix cancer, obtaining molecular profiles will help identify potential treatment options since we don’t have the clinical trial data to help guide treatments as we do in common tumors,” said lead author John Paul Shen, MD, a postdoctoral fellow in the lab of co-author Trey Ideker, PhD, UC San Diego School of Medicine professor of medicine. “Equally important, the mutation profile can be used as a biomarker to separate high-risk patients, who need intensive treatment, from low-risk patients who may not need such an intensive treatment.”The retrospective study found that appendix cancer is comprised of five distinct subtypes: mucinous adenocarcinomas (46 percent), adenocarcinomas (30 percent), goblet cell carcinoids (12 percent), pseudomyxoma peritonei (7.7 percent) and signet ring cell carcinomas (5.2 percent).A mutation in the gene GNAS, rare in colon cancer, was found to be quite frequent in appendix cancer, especially in mucinous adenocarcinomas (52 percent) and pseudomyxoma peritonei (72 percent). Patients with tumors harboring a GNAS mutation had a median survival of almost 10 years, while those whose tumors had a TP53 mutation had median survival of only three years. Patients who had neither gene mutation had a six-year median survival rate.”This striking finding raises the question of whether patients with early stage, GNAS-mutant tumors need to be treated with chemotherapy, as it is possible they could be cured with surgery alone; a question we will focus on in our next study,” said Shen.”Understanding the molecular differences between the subtypes of appendiceal tumors is an important stepping stone for future clinical trials to develop and test different therapeutic approaches that are specific to this disease,” said senior author Olivier Harismendy, PhD, assistant professor of medicine at UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center.last_img read more

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AlmostEarth Tantalizes Astronomers With Promise of Worlds to Come

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From the extent and timing of that dimming, the researchers calculated that the planet is almost the same size as Earth—just 10% bigger in diameter—and goes around its star once every 130 days. Although its mass is unknown, astronomers say its size almost guarantees that it is rocky like Earth. Its distance from its star—about as far from the star as Mercury is from the sun—puts it in the outer reaches of Kepler-186’s habitable zone.Planets previously found in the habitable zones of other stars have been substantially larger than Earth  and unlikely to have a rocky surface. But because it orbits a dwarf, “we consider this planet more of an Earth cousin than an Earth twin,” says Elisa Quintana, a researcher at NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California, and lead author of a paper announcing the discovery this week in Science. Small, faint stars like type Ms make up more than three-quarters of the billions of stars in the Milky Way, however, so the finding could open a wide new hunting ground for extraterrestrial life. “Our galaxy is probably littered with cousins of Kepler-186f,” Quintana says.Several factors could make such planets less promising abodes for life than planets circling sunlike stars. For one, their close-in habitable zones could leave them extra vulnerable to perils such as stellar flares. On the plus side, M stars keep burning billions of years longer than sunlike stars do. “That is good news for life, because there is a longer period of time for it to take hold on the surface of the planet,” says Stephen Kane, a co-author and researcher at San Francisco State University in California.Kepler-186f is a late bonus from Kepler, which monitored the brightness of some 150,000 stars from March 2009 to May 2013 in search of planets. Analyzing Kepler data, scientists have identified more than 3800 planetary candidates, of which 961 have been confirmed as planets. As the software to search Kepler’s data improves, scientists keep finding planets that they missed before.Researchers had detected Kepler-186’s four inner planets by the spring of 2013. Then, a routine analysis of all of Kepler’s light curves—a procedure that typically takes weeks of supercomputer time—flagged the possible existence of a small fifth planet. Quintana’s team conducted a series of checks to ensure that what the software had found was a genuine transit.To learn more about the planet, Quintana and colleagues had to learn more about the star. By taking spectra of Kepler-186 with ground-based telescopes, they nailed down its mass and size—information that helped them determine the planet’s radius. “I remember walking to Elisa’s office one afternoon, and she looked up at me and said, ‘The planet’s about the size of the Earth,’ ” says Steve Howell, project scientist for Kepler at NASA Ames and a co-author of the paper. Further analysis placed the planet in the outer reaches of the star’s habitable zone.“We are not saying that there’s water on the surface,” Howell says. “All we know is that the surface has the right temperature that water could exist there in a liquid state.” To support water, however, the planet would also need to have an atmosphere to protect it. It’s unclear from the available data whether the planet has an adequate atmospheric blanket.Even those key ingredients wouldn’t guarantee that Kepler-186f is habitable. If it orbited slightly closer in, Quintana says, gravitational interactions would leave the planet tidally locked: rotating so that one side always faced the star. Such two-faced planets—with the night side eternally frigid and the day side blistering hot—are considered long shots for life. But Quintana and her colleagues say Kepler-186f is far enough out that it might avoid that fate.Unfortunately, the planet is too far away from Earth for follow-up studies. However, researchers hope it heralds many similar worlds soon to come. “The biggest impact of this discovery is to know that there are planets that are the same size as Earth in the habitable zones of small stars,” Charbonneau says. He says the next step will be “to find a close example” so that upcoming instruments like the Giant Magellan Telescope and NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope can “study the atmosphere of such planets and perhaps even deduce the presence of life on them.” Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email Ever since the first exoplanet was discovered in 1996, astronomers have been scanning the heavens for another Earth: a rocky planet orbiting its star at just the right distance for it to harbor liquid water and thus, potentially, life. Now, sifting through data collected by NASA’s Kepler orbiting observatory, they have discovered just such a planet, although it’s not quite Earth 2.0. Named Kepler-186f, the planet orbits a star that is less than half the size of the sun and much cooler.“Very exciting,” says James Kasting, an exoplanet researcher at Pennsylvania State University, University Park, who was not involved in the work. “This is probably the most potentially Earth-like planet yet.” David Charbonneau, an exoplanet researcher at Harvard University, calls it “one of the most significant discoveries from Kepler.”The new world is the outermost of five planets orbiting Kepler-186, a red dwarf star some 500 light-years from Earth. Such M stars typically have a fraction of the mass of the sun, burn more slowly, and are too faint to be seen with the naked eye. (Hotter sunlike stars are classified as type G.) Kepler detected the planet from a minuscule dimming of the star each time the planet transited, or crossed the face of the star. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. 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Male gorillas who babysit have five times more babies

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first_img By Ann GibbonsOct. 15, 2018 , 5:00 AM Email When it comes to gorillas, the males who help females out with their infants get benefits. The benefits? More babies. A new study of male gorillas in the wild in Rwanda has found that those who spend the most time grooming infants and resting with them—others’ offspring as well as their own—have about five times more offspring than males who don’t help out with the little ones.This is surprising, scientists say, because male caretaking isn’t usually considered a smart reproductive strategy in primate species where access to females is intensely competitive. Instead, researchers thought the most successful strategy for males would be to put more time and energy into outcompeting other males for a mate, as chimps do.That strategy still works for many male gorillas, who dominate small harems of females. But in 40% of the groups of mountain gorillas studied at the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund’s Karisoke Research Center in Volcanoes National Park in Rwanda there is more than one male in a group, sometimes as many as nine. And those males need to be resourceful to get a female’s attention. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img It turns out the way to a mom’s heart is through her offspring, according to the new analysis, published today in Nature Scientific Reports. Genetic paternity data for 23 adult males and 109 infants, along with 10 to 38 hours of observations for each male gorilla, suggest the more time these “babysitters” spend with infants, the more reproductive success they will have. The findings could even have implications for the evolution of paternal care in humans, given that we are the only other ape species whose males are willing to help out with the kids. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Male gorillas who babysit have five times more babieslast_img read more

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Ancient humans hunted monkeys for tens of thousands of years

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first_img By Virginia MorellFeb. 19, 2019 , 12:05 PM Early Sri Lankans turned the bones of the monkeys and squirrels they hunted into these projectile points. Ancient humans hunted monkeys for tens of thousands of years O. Wedage Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) N. Amano The scientists analyzed almost 14,500 animal bones and teeth from four periods of occupation and found that gazelle-size mammals were the most common. Monkeys (primarily macaques and purple-faced langurs, the latter of which inhabit the tallest trees, reaching some 45 meters) and tree squirrels made up more than 70% of the identified remains, which also included otters, fish, reptiles, and birds. Fewer than 4% of the bones came from deer, pigs, and bovids, such as buffalo. Many bones bore cut marks from butchery and had been burned, signs that humans processed them for meat. Email If you picture early humans dining, you likely imagine them sitting down to a barbecue of mammoth, aurochs, and giant elk meat. But in the rainforests of Sri Lanka, where our ancestors ventured about 45,000 years ago, people hunted more modest fare, primarily monkeys and tree squirrels. Then they turned the bones of these animals into projectiles to hunt more of them. The practice continued for tens of thousands of years, making this the longest known record of humans hunting other primates, archaeologists report today. Many scientists believed such forests lacked the resources for early humans to successfully settle. Instead, our ancestors apparently quickly adapted to this and other challenging environments (such as high elevations and deserts), in part by figuring out how to reliably hunt difficult-to-catch prey.To conduct the research, archaeologist Patrick Roberts of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History (SHH) in Jena, Germany, and colleagues analyzed animal bones recovered from Sri Lanka’s Fa Hien Cave in Kalutara during excavations from 2009 and 2012. Materials and artifacts including charcoal, faunal remains, shell beads, and bone and stone tools indicate people occupied the site from about 45,000 to 4000 years ago. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Early humans settled in this Sri Lankan cave 45,000 years ago. The archaeologists also uncovered numerous microliths (minutely shaped stone tools), whose purpose is as yet unknown, but were likely used for hunting. In addition, they identified some three dozen finished or partially completed bone projectile points. These ancient humans were using “bones from the hunted monkeys to hunt more monkeys,” says study co-author Noel Amano, an archaeologist at SHH.Finally, the remains reveal that the early Sri Lankans were sustainable hunters, primarily targeting adult animals, the scientists report today in Nature Communications. “They hunted these animals for nearly 40,000 years, without driving any to extinction,” Roberts says. “So they must have had sophisticated knowledge of monkey life cycles and an understanding of how to use resources wisely.”The findings support the idea that, as humans spread across the world, they had to shift from hunting large, roaming animals like mammoth and bison to smaller prey that “could withstand a higher rate of predation,” says archaeologist Robin Dennell at the University of Sheffield in the United Kingdom, who was not involved in the study.These ancient humans probably already knew how to hunt more agile and elusive game, says Steve Kuhn, an archaeologist at the University of Arizona in Tucson. People had started to hunt small animals in Eurasia about the same time they first entered Sri Lanka, he notes, and so likely arrived with these skills.Kuhn also cautions that the early Sri Lankans might not have been such wise resource managers; more likely the human populations were small and “didn’t make much of an impact.” They hunted more monkeys and squirrels and fewer deer or pigs, he thinks, simply because the smaller animals were likely more abundant. Like those of us who don’t have time to shop and cook, and so grab a burger, these early people may have simply hunted and dined on the animals that were most readily available.last_img read more

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National Academy of Sciences to allow expulsion of harassers

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first_img Maxwell MacKenzie/National Academy of Sciences For the first time since its founding in 1863, the National Academy of Sciences will allow expulsion of members for serious offenses including sexual harassment. National Academy of Sciences to allow expulsion of harassers The prestigious U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in Washington, D.C., has voted to allow expulsion of members for breaches of its Code of Conduct, including sexual harassment. Until now, election to the 156-year-old academy, a pinnacle of scientific achievement, has been a lifetime honor.In voting that concluded on 31 May with results announced this morning, 84% of those who cast ballots approved an amendment to the organization’s bylaws, allowing expulsion of a member by a two-thirds vote of NAS’s 17-member Council; 16% voted against the change. The average age of NAS members is 72; 83% are men. Although 2242 NAS members were eligible to vote, the academy did not disclose how many participated.“All women who have had a tough road—even those who have made it—I’m sure like me are happy to see this day where they can finally say: ‘The climate is gonna change,’” says Marcia McNutt, president of NAS, who drove the vote to the change the bylaws. “No longer will a climate be tolerated that doesn’t allow women to have the same chance as their male colleagues to thrive.” Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country The change comes in response to the #MeToo movement against sexual harassment. In June 2018, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM), of which NAS is a part, issued a landmark report documenting pervasive sexual harassment in those disciplines, including a broad experience of gender hostility that goes beyond groping and has driven untold numbers of women out of science.“We know from research that one of the most potent predictors of sexual harassment is the organization’s tolerance of it,” says Lilia Cortina, an expert on sexual harassment at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor and a member of the committee that wrote the 2018 NASEM report. “This vote … sends a strong message that this institution will not tolerate gender-based abuse or harbor known abusers.”Under a process developed by NAS’s Council and described in greater detail here, any person can bring a complaint about an NAS member for any breach of the organization’s Code of Conduct, which spans behaviors including bullying, discrimination, sexual harassment, and scientific misconduct—the last defined as fabrication, falsification, or plagiarism. NAS would not itself investigate such claims. Rather, the complainant must document wrongdoing by presenting official findings by outside funding agencies, journals, or academic or other institutions.McNutt says she “very soon” expects a number of requests to expel existing members. “I think some will be more straightforward than others.” NAS members whose universities have concluded that they sexually harassed women include astronomer Geoff Marcy, formerly of the University of California (UC), Berkeley, and evolutionary biologist Francisco Ayala, formerly of UC Irvine.A year ago, BethAnn McLaughlin, a neuroscientist at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, founded the nonprofit #MeTooSTEM and launched a petition since signed by 5889 people urging NAS to expel harassers. “I’m thrilled,” she says of the vote. “Belonging to a scientific society is an honor, not a right. I hope other science societies do the same immediately.”Others see the change as just a first step. “I challenge all members of the NAS to take the next step to change their home institutions. American science depends on it,” says Nobel laureate Carol Greider, an NAS member and biologist at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland.The presidents of the other U.S. academies—the National Academy of Medicine and the National Academy of Engineering—also committed last year to addressing sexual harassment. The National Academy of Medicine in January amended its bylaws to allow expulsion of sexual harassers, President Victor Dzau told Science today.*Correction, 3 June, 2:20 p.m.: This story has been corrected to reflect the fact that the National Academy of Medicine has already amended its bylaws to allow the expulsion of sexual harassers.center_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Meredith WadmanJun. 3, 2019 , 10:45 AMlast_img read more

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Family Of Black Trans Woman Who Died Speaks

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first_imgOn June 7, 27-year-old transgender woman named Layleen Polanco was found dead in her cell in Rikers Island. She was in solitary confinement and incarcerated for because was being held on $500 bail due to prostitution and lowest-level drug possession charges dating back to 2017.No one knows why she died and her family is speaking out. D.L. Hughley Calls Transgender Actress A ‘P**sy’ For Comments About Kevin Hart AOL Build Speaker Series - D.L. Hughley, 'Black Man, White House: An Oral History of the Obama Years' Thanks for signing up! Get ready for Exclusive content, Interviews,and Breaking news delivered direct to your inbox. Get ready for Exclusive content, Interviews,and Breaking news delivered direct to your inbox. A statement from the family of #LayleenPolanco@antiviolence @womensmarch @SRLP @chasestrangio @IndyaMoore @janetmock @tracelysette @JailsAction @elielcruz @AudaciaRay @CloseRosies @nonewjails_nyc @NYCAIC @NYCmayor @CorrectionNYC @AOC @CoreyinNYC @NYCCouncil @VOCALNewYork pic.twitter.com/o934G1X1d4— Shanies Law Office (@ShaniesLaw) June 9, 2019Officials have said there were no signs of foul play, which seemed to imply she killed herself, the same narrative that was put out there about Sandra Bland.  According to ABC News, at a rally yesterday, Polacano’s friend Christina Vengerovsky said, “Layleen would never kill herself because at times during my depression, she would always tell me that’s one thing God will never forgive you for and neither will I.”Melanie Brown, Polacano’s sister added, “My sister was very strong, that’s one thing, She didn’t believe in death. She did not believe in dying.” There is a GoFundMe campaign for Polacano’s funeral, which was started by her sister.Layleen is was part of the Black and Latino ballroom scene, which is a subculture  that has people from various houses, who operate like families, that compete in fashion, beauty and dance. Layleen was a part of this scene and known as Layleen Xtravaganza. Indya Moore, who stars in the FX series “Pose” (second season premiers tonight), wrote on Twitter, “I grew up looking to Layleen as my goal. She was one of the most beautiful women I ever seen who was trans. She and so many other girls were an example to me. She was a member of my house, Xtravaganza. She died in her cell in Rikers.  10th trans woman.” SEE ALSO: Muhlaysia Booker Incident Comes As Violence Against Black Trans Women Is SoaringThe 27-year-old’s family members released a statement saying that “the city failed to protect Layleen, and now it is trying to sweep her death under the rug.” They also added, “We will not allow it.” .@IndyaMoore speaking at Foley Square to demand justice for Layleen Polanco. #Justice4Layleen pic.twitter.com/vESOBGp7WQ— Jason Rosenberg (@mynameisjro) June 10, 2019Rep. Alexandria Ocasio Cortez wrote on Twitter, “No human being should be tortured by or in the United States. That means NO ONE should be kept in solitary confinement. Layleen Polanco was, and now she’s gone – all for $500 bail + low lvl offense.” Meghan McCain Whines That She Can’t Attack llhan Omar Because Trump Is Too Racist I grew up looking to Layleen as my goal. She was one of the most beautiful women I ever seen who was trans. She and so many other girls were an example to me. She was a member of my house, Xtravaganza. She died in her cell in Rikers. 10th trans woman. https://t.co/92UcnUB2Z2— IAM (@IndyaMoore) June 9, 2019See Moore speak at a rally for Layleen below: Layleen Polanco , Rikers Island , Transgender center_img Transwomen of color face violence at a higher whether on the street or incarcerated.A report from the Human Rights Campaign said that 2018 was the second consecutive year that more than two-dozen members of the transgender community were known to have been killed. At least 26 transgender people were killed in 2018, the majority of them Black transgender women. Since 2013, there have been 128 killings of transgender people, of whom 80 percent were people of color.The actual number of transgender victims was not clear. Physical attacks, harassment and sexual assaults against transgender people are often underreported. Added to the problem, police often identify victims by their birth gender instead of their self-identified gender.Rest in power, Layleen PolancoSEE ALSO:Meet Jogger Joe, The Man Who Took Racist Cue From BBQ Becky In Tossing Homeless Man’s ClothesMom Of Woman Reportedly Killed By Pastor Begs For Transgender People To Be Seen As HumanMorehouse Makes History With New Transgender Policy Entertainment, News and Lifestyle for Black America. News told by us for us. Black America’s #1 News Source: Our News. Our Voice. SUBSCRIBE See the full statement below: A$AP Rocky Being In A Swedish Prison Will Not Stop Her From Going To The Country That Showed Her ‘So Much Love’ No human being should be tortured by or in the United States.That means NO ONE should be kept in solitary confinement.Layleen Polanco was, and now she’s gone – all for $500 bail + low lvl offense.#CloseRikers#AbolishSolitary#EndCashBail#DecriminalizePoverty#EndWarOnDrugs https://t.co/3p9bcXg8HB— Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (@AOC) June 11, 2019 More By NewsOne Staff Gov. Cuomo Slams Mayor Bill De Blasio For The Eric Garner Case But He Also Failed The Familylast_img read more

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Vaccine opponents attack US science panel

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first_img Vaccine opponents attack U.S. science panel Last week, police guarded the doors as a crowd filled 165 public seats in CDC’s auditorium; at least 80 attendees were vaccine opponents. They came from as far away as Iowa, Massachusetts, and California, Barron says. For the first time, committee members were roped off from the public—a setup that mirrors the vaccination controversy in the country at large, says Bernice Hausman, a cultural theorist at Pennsylvania State University’s College of Medicine in Hershey. “On one side is evidence-based, dispassionate discourse; on the other, citizens making emotional appeals, using alternative evidence, or telling personal stories. … The two don’t seem to meet,” says Hausman, whose book, Anti/Vax: Reframing the Vaccination Controversy, will be published in April.Forty-five people had asked to offer public comment; only a score, drawn by lottery, could be accommodated. All but two of the speakers attacked vaccinations and the committee. “I can’t explain why suddenly things shifted after so many years with relatively modest public comments,” says ACIP member Kelly Moore, who until recently directed the Tennessee Immunization Program and is an assistant clinical professor of health policy at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville. “But it’s our duty to listen … and to make sure that we are aware of what public sentiment is.”One reason vaccination opponents have begun to turn out at ACIP may be that they are disappointed in President Donald Trump, says Paul Offit, who directs the Vaccine Education Center at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia in Pennsylvania. A “vaccine safety and scientific integrity” commission that Trump promised to set up soon after he was elected never materialized, for example. Offit suggests vaccine opponents felt “they had their man in the White House—that things were gonna happen for them. And they didn’t.”Despite the emotion and determination of vaccine resisters, U.S. vaccination rates among young children remain robust. A 2017 CDC analysis found more than 90% of toddlers had received most recommended vaccines, and only 1.3% of children born in 2015 had received none of the 14 recommended early-childhood vaccinations—a quadrupling from the 0.3% figure in 2001, but still a tiny fraction. (The refusal rate is higher in some geographical pockets, several of which are now battling measles outbreaks.)The increasingly vituperative public attacks can be tough on ACIP scientists, however. “How does it feel knowing that your vote killed my son?” one woman asked the panel in October 2018. But Romero doubts the protests will make it tougher to recruit experts to serve on the committee. “It would take a lot to make us not come,” he says, calling the position “the pinnacle of public health impact. … Most of us consider this an extremely high honor to be here.”*Correction, 12 March, 12:55 p.m.: This story has been updated to reflect Kelly Moore’s current affiliation. ATLANTA—The U.S. antivaccine movement has found a new front for its attacks on scientists and their work: gatherings of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), which recommends which vaccines Americans should receive. Since last summer, increasing numbers of vaccine opponents have come to ACIP meetings, held three times a year here at the campus of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), to vent their anger at the 15 buttoned-down experts on the panel during the public comments section—and to lambaste vaccination in general.“I do not consent to handing over my God-given children to the government of the United States of America,” Sandy Spaetti, who had traveled from Rockport, Indiana, said at ACIP’s meeting on 27 February, to raucous applause from dozens of other activists. “How is a vaccine that caused my son’s intestines to fold in on itself and almost die safe and effective?” asked Nicole Mason, a photographer from Jacksonville, Florida, who said she lost faith in all vaccines when her 4-month-old son developed intussusception, an intestinal obstruction, after receiving the rotavirus vaccine last summer. (The blockage occurs in an estimated one to five of every 100,000 infants vaccinated; it can also be caused by rotavirus infection itself.)“This may be the new normal. We don’t know. But it certainly is a lot more than we have seen in the past,” says ACIP’s new chair, José Romero, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and Arkansas Children’s Hospital in Little Rock who has served on the panel for 4 years. By Meredith WadmanMar. 4, 2019 , 1:10 PM Melinda Wharton, director of immunization services at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, listens to public comment during an Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices meeting last week. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe John Bazemore/AP Photo Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email ACIP members, mostly physicians, review reams of data, then develop and vote on recommendations for vaccines ranging from niche to universal. At last week’s meeting, for instance, they considered tweaks to the schedule for vaccinating travelers to Asia and the western Pacific against Japanese encephalitis. They were also briefed on new studies as they consider whether to recommend that U.S. adults aged 27 through 45 consider getting vaccinated against the cancer-causing human papillomavirus. The 75-minute public comment period came at the end of the technical presentations.“This is kind of ground zero where these decisions are being made,” says Lynette Barron, a radio talk show host from Pell City, Alabama, who says her 3- and 5-year-old daughters were harmed by vaccines. Barron has attended ACIP meetings since early 2017; back then, “I was here by myself,” she says. But last year, she launched the Facebook page “Inundate the CDC ACIP Meetings.” Some 20 vaccination opponents showed up at ACIP’s June 2018 meeting. The October 2018 meeting drew perhaps 50, she says. That event grew so tense that in January, CDC issued new rules of conduct, warning members of the public to expect metal detectors at the doors and putting them on notice that the chair would eject them for disruptive behavior. K. J. Moore, a traveling nurse, told a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention vaccine panel last week that she is upset by mandates that health care workers receive the flu vaccine. John Bazemore/AP Photo last_img read more

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The Human Remains of Skeleton Lake – Visible Only when the Ice

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first_imgHave you ever imagined swimming in a clear mountain lake…. that is littered with human bones and skulls? Perhaps not everyone’s dream holiday! Around 75 years ago, this was the scene discovered by a ranger in a remote heights of the Himalayas, at an elevation of 15,750 feet. The mountain ranger, H. K. Madhawl, probably didn’t consider taking a swim in the ice-cold waters. Roopkund Lake, in the state of Uttarakhand, India, is a six-foot-deep glacial lake that remains frozen for most of the year round.The remains of roughly 300 people were subsequently removed from the lake. A number of these victims of the mountain were so well preserved that they still had remnants of flesh, hair, fingernails, and clothes. Jewelry and other artifacts have been found over the years.Roopkund Lake. Photo by Ashokyadav739 CC BY-SA 4.0It is because of this odd mass grave that Roopkund is also known as the Skeleton Lake. However, the lake’s contents stir a striking contrast with the scenic beauty of the mountainous region. The surreal sight of human remains deposited on the margins of the lake is visible only when the snow and the ice melt.Besides the skeletons, the melting ice has also revealed personal belongings such as knives, spears, and leather shoes.Human skeletons at Roopkund Lake. Photo by Schwiki CC BY-SA 4.0The area is a well-noted destination among global trekkers. But to reach the place, it takes a real effort to progress through the steep route that ascends from the village of Lohajung (7,700 feet) — a five day trek through thick forest, lush meadows, and up into the alpine landscape.The popular trek tours run only in May-Jane and September-October, when this section of the Garhwal Himalayas is accessible. Once every 12 years, trekkers will find themselves joined by thousands of devotees to the Goddess Nanda Devi who are undertaking an arduous 22-day barefoot pilgrimage to the Sri Yantra (breath of divinity) at Nauti village.Uttarakhand, India.The gruesome discovery of Roopkund Lake’s bones is credited to H. K. Madhawl, a ranger at the Nanda Devi national park who traversed the area in 1942. But the area has featured in local folklore stories for decades.What he saw up there confused everyone. At first, it was one bone. But as the temperatures warmed more and more, the number of exposed remains steadily grew. People wondered what happened, and what were these people doing up here?Trekking path to Roopkund, passing near Bedni Bugyal. Photo by Djds4rce CC BY-SA 3.0The initial assumption was that these were the remains of a group of Japanese soldiers. Since it was the midst of WW2, such an explanation sounded logical enough, but the bones appeared too old.Other theories were proposed throughout the years, even people wondering if this was perhaps a ritual suicide. Others suggested the deaths may have been caused by a natural catastrophic event. Perhaps a landslide or avalanche?Roopkund lake is covered with ice for most of the year. Photo by Abhijeet Rane CC BY 2.0A more concrete explanation had to wait for another six decades, enough time for people to start believing the local legends about how the skeletons came to be there.As the legend goes, these are the holy lands of the Goddess Nanda, her sanctuary in the mountains. King Jasdal of Kanauj and his wife were undertaking the “Nanda Jat” pilgrimage; along the way, the queen gave birth. Instead of pleasing their goddess with their tributes, the deity was angered for this defielment of her pure mountain.To punish the group, she sent a great snowstorm, flinging iron-like hailstones that took the life of each and every person.Mysterious Islands From Around The WorldA more advanced scientific effort was carried out in 2004, and the answer, eerily enough, was not too far from what the legend says. It was found that injuries to the skulls and shoulder bones of the skeletons were consistent with the victims being hit from above.Traces of round-shaped blows and cracks were found on the bones. Presumably, it was “iron-like” hailstones, just as the legend tells.Human skeletons captured in skeleton lake in Roopkund. Photo by Ashokyadav739 CC BY-SA 4.0The 2004 expedition also took samples of the bones as well as bits of preserved human tissues. DNA analysis was supported by the Hyderabad’s Center for Cellular and Molecular Biology in India, and the research team included several European scientists.According to the conclusions of their study, there were two distinct groups of people, as there were evident differences in the bone features of their bodies. All remains were dated to the ninth century AD.Roopkund. Photo by Neha iitb CC BY-SA 4.0The plausible scenario of what exactly happened? The two groups perhaps met at the foot of the mountain. The first of the two, taller  and who which outnumbered the others, probably wanted to make a pilgrimage pass through the mountain.The second group, with thinner and smaller bones, showed up as their local guides. The travelers were related to each other (a large family or tribe), and could have come from Iran. The locals that guided the way were unrelated.Another suggestion is that they braved the elements to collect “Keeda Jadi,” which are larvae of the ghost moth that have become the home to a fungus (that actually wraps around the larvae and slowly devours it). These “Magical Mushrooms” are believed to have incredible medicinal properties and locals head out in search of them in the springtime.Human skeleton, Skeleton Lake. Photo by Ashokyadav739 CC BY-SA 4.0The journey should have progressed well until the point everyone was trapped, with no place to run and hide as a disaster struck. A  violent torrent of baseball-sized hailstones falling from the skies battered the whole group.Read another story from us: Stone Age Kitchen Found at the Bottom of a Lake, complete with 9,000-yr-old StoveTrekkers who come to the lake can still see the remains of this ancient group, though the number of visible skeletons has over time been reduced. It is said people take some of the bones as a souvenir. Government officials have considered preserving the site from further desecration by travelers, to ensure the age-old remains are left as they are.Stefan is a freelance writer and a regular contributor to The Vintage News. He is a graduate in Literature. He also runs the blog This City Knows.last_img read more

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Massive 18th Century EggShaped Underground Ice House Discovered in London

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first_imgA forgotten 18th century ice house, enormous in scale, was discovered during development work in 2018 at Regent’s Crescent in London, bringing back to life an era when the wealthy stored ice blocks underground all year round, allowing them to preserve food and serve iced delicacies no matter the season. As the decades went by, this egg-shaped ice chamber also served hospitals and pubs, experts say. Clean ice was made use of by physicians to numb their patients for medical and dental procedures.Measuring 24 feet wide and 35 feet deep, the red brick, egg-shaped chamber survived World War Two’s Blitz bombing, even though the mews houses were destroyed above ground, and remains in excellent condition, along with its entrance passage and vaulted ante-chamber.A cross section diagram showing the interior of the ice house. © MoLA“There was always an understanding that there was an ice house here somewhere, but we weren’t sure where,” David Sorapure, the head of built heritage at Museum of London Archaeology (MoLA) told The Guardian. He had been working on the site with developers Great Marlborough Estates. “Even after we discovered where the entrance was, we weren’t quite sure how big it was, or how you got in.”The ice was either taken from local canals or lakes, or, in the 19th century, imported from Scandinavia by boat. Most ice houses were smaller, located near the houses of the wealthy.The speculation is that Samuel Dash, with a family link to the brewing industry, was behind the original construction of this ice house in the 1780s.A MoLA archaeologist brushes the near-perfect exterior of the Regent’s Crescent Ice House exposed during excavation in 2015. © MoLAThe ice house was used by many more people in the 1820s, when William Leftwich, a pioneering ice merchant and confectioner, began importing high-quality ice from Norway. In 1822, he charted a vessel that brought 300 tonnes of frozen fjord, which he transported to the ice house.“Following a very mild winter, he chartered a vessel to make the 2,000 km round trip from Great Yarmouth to Norway to collect 300 tonnes of ice harvested from crystal-clear frozen lakes,” according to Ian Visits. “The venture was not without risk: previous imports had been lost at sea, or melted whilst baffled customs officials dithered over how to tax such novel cargo.”Ice blocks are cut and loaded onto a horse drawn sled.Luckily, a decision was made in time for the ice to be transported along the Regent’s Canal, and for Leftwich to turn a profit.Once the ice was in place, workers would have climbed down into the void from a small corridor near the top, to chip off blocks when needed. Insulated with hay, these were then shipped by horse and cart to restaurants and private addresses and also, potentially, to some of the medical establishments nearby, according to Danny Harrison, a senior archaeologist at MoLA.Sorapure said to the media, “Standing inside the cavernous and beautifully constructed Ice House at Regent’s Crescent, it is fascinating to think that it would once have been filled with tons of blocks of ice that had traveled across the North Sea and along the Regent’s Canal to get there.”Five men cut large blocks of ice from a frozen lake.“The structure demonstrates the extraordinary the lengths gone to at this time to serve up luxury fashionable frozen treats and furnish food traders and retailers with ice.”Once refrigeration became widespread in the 20th century, ice houses were abandoned.The Ice House has been designated as a Scheduled Monument by Historic England, and it is hoped that public access, via a new viewing corridor, will be made available at certain times of year during archaeological and architectural festivals.Great Marlborough Estates, which own the property, is in the process of restoring the historical features of the Crescent along with the Ice House. Built in 1819, the Grade I listed Georgian crescent was designed by John Nash, who was the famed architect of Buckingham Palace.The houses were destroyed by the Nazis during the Blitz and subsequently replaced in the 1960s by a replica.Read another story from us: Ready to Flee the Volcano – Rare Harnessed Horse Found in Pompeii RuinsHonoring Nash’s original vision, the redevelopment of Regent’s Crescent aims to remain historically authentic, “from the shape of the windows to the lime-washed render wash used on the façade,” reported the Daily Mirror.Nancy Bilyeau, a former staff editor at Entertainment Weekly, Rolling Stone, and InStyle, has written a trilogy of historical thrillers for Touchstone Books. Her new book, The Blue, is a spy story set in the 18th-century porcelain world. For more information, go to www.nancybilyeau.comlast_img read more

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Utility companies join together to bring power to Navajo homes

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first_imgUtility companies join together to bring power to Navajo homes Photo courtesy of Arizona Public ServiceArizona Public Service Lineman Roman Middleton, who grew up in Holbrook, works to connect Elizabeth Begay’s house in Tonalea to the grid during the Light Up Navajo project that connected 233 remote homes on the Navajo Nation to electricity during the six-week pilot project launched in April. June 26, 2019center_img By Toni Gibbons In a world where a light switch is simply a part of life, it is hard to imagine the darkness that 15,000 families, living on the rugged, remote, ancestral lands of theSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Adlast_img read more

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Gunmen massacre 18 including children in Papua New Guinea attack

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first_img Papua New Guinea assesses extent of damage from strong quake Related News Advertising By Reuters |Sydney | Published: July 10, 2019 2:17:43 pm Karnataka: SC to rule today, says Speaker’s powers need relook papua new guinea, papua new guinea attack, gunmen, gunmen attack, papua new guinea gunmen attack, james marape, tribal feud, violence, criminals, world news indian express news Undialu said the particular trigger for the killings in Karida village, some 630 km (390 miles) northwest of the capital, Port Moresby, was not known but the violence was the latest flare-up of a conflict running for years. (Representational Image)Gunmen have massacred as many as 18 people including women and children in a remote village in Papua New Guinea, apparently the latest victims of a tribal feud, and Prime Minister James Marape vowed on Wednesday to hunt down the killers. Gas project critic James Marape elected Papua New Guinea PM Ten members of Papua New Guinea’s U19s suspended for stealing NRC deadline approaching, families stranded in Assam floods stay home center_img Undialu said the particular trigger for the killings in Karida village, some 630 km (390 miles) northwest of the capital, Port Moresby, was not known but the violence was the latest flare-up of a conflict running for years.Those targeted had offered shelter to victims of a bout of violence several weeks ago, he said.“It was retaliation of a previous attack … it was a very sudden attack,” he said, adding that in all, 24 people had been killed in the latest phase of violence.“Both attacks were made in an innocent community where people were not expecting it and all of us are in a state of shock.” Prime Minister Marape said he was “coming for” the killers.“In memory of the innocent who continue to die at the hands of gun-toting criminals, your time is up,” Marape said in a post on his official Facebook page.“Before I had someone else to report to, now I have no one else to report to but the innocent you kill,” he said. “I am not afraid to use strongest measures in law on you … I am coming for you.”Marape, who became leader in May, cited a lack of police on the ground as a major problem in a region that has for years grappled with violence, sometimes driven by disputes over the distribution of resource wealth.Last year, aid workers bringing relief supplies to the area’s district town of Tari after a big earthquake were ordered out and the army was sent in to quell tribal disputes. Violence has long ravaged the poor but resource-rich Pacific Ocean nation, but the scale of the latest bloodletting has shocked the country.“It’s a very sad story,” Philip Undialu, the governor of Hela Province in the rugged central highlands where the attack took place, told Reuters by phone.Pictures posted on Facebook showed the dead, including several children, from the Monday violence wrapped in cloth and laid on palm leaves by the side of a road. In undecided Congress, first open call for Priyanka: She should be party chief Advertising Best Of Express Post Comment(s)last_img read more

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How long is Saturns day Search reveals an even deeper mystery

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first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country By Paul VoosenOct. 4, 2018 , 2:00 PM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe How long is Saturn’s day? Search reveals an even deeper mystery Emailcenter_img Last year, as Cassini made its grand finale, diving between Saturn and its rings (and ultimately vaporizing into the planet), researchers hoped new measures of the planet’s magnetic field might finally resolve the mystery. Such a close-up view, they hoped, would allow them to detangle signals that stemmed from the planet’s atmosphere versus those generated by its dense interior layer of metallic hydrogen, thought to be the source of its magnetic field.But Saturn, it seems, had other plans. In new work published today in Science, the Cassini team disclosed the finest measures yet of Saturn’s magnetic field, revealing its two axes are offset by less than a measly 0.0095°, with the exact offset still unknown. The extreme alignment has, so far, not allowed a finer measure of the planet’s day. But it also points toward a deeper mystery: Planetary dynamos, which generate magnetic fields, typically require an offset between these two axes to continue. Given this nearly perfect symmetry, then, how does Saturn have a magnetic field at all? Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) For decades, researchers have puzzled over a seemingly simple mystery: the length of a day on Saturn. Unlike the rocky planets of the inner solar system, whose rotations are measured by simply tracking objects on their spinning surfaces, the fixed interiors of planets like Jupiter and Saturn are veiled by ever-shifting flows of gas.To get around this problem, scientists have turned to distinctive radio waves created by each planet’s magnetic field. On Jupiter, Uranus, and Neptune, the axis of the magnetic field is offset against the planet’s rotation; as the two axes wobble around each other, a predictable pattern of radio waves is generated, pegged to the start of each day.On Saturn, however, the two axes are almost perfectly aligned, leading to inconclusive results. In the early 1980s, the Voyager spacecraft estimated Saturn’s day at 10 hours, 39 minutes; when the Cassini spacecraft arrived more than a decade ago, its estimate was 10 hours, 45 minutes—and the number kept changing.last_img read more

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Why are US neuroscientists clamoring for marmosets

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first_img Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe WASHINGTON, D.C.—A hand-size monkey called Callithrix jacchus—the common marmoset—is in great demand in labs and yet almost nowhere to be found. Marmosets’ small size, fast growth, and sophisticated social life were already enough to catch the eye of neuroscientists. They’ve now been genetically engineered to make their brains easier to image and to serve as models for neurological disorders such as autism and Parkinson’s. The problem: “There are just no monkeys,” says Cory Miller, a neuroscientist at the University of California, San Diego.At a meeting here this week, convened by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s (NASEM’s) Institute for Laboratory Animal Research, neuroscientist Jon Levine, who directs the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, likened the surge in demand to “a 10-alarm fire that’s about to be set.” In response, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) plans to launch funding to expand marmoset research. And established marmoset researchers, including Miller, are working together to help new labs get animals.When Miller’s lab started to work with marmosets in 2009, many colleagues who studied macaques—the most popular genus of research monkey—didn’t even know that marmosets were monkeys, he remembers. “They were like, ‘Is it those chipmunks that were in the Rocky Mountains?’” (They were thinking of marmots.) By Kelly ServickOct. 23, 2018 , 1:00 PM Now, he says, “All of those people want marmosets.” In a survey, Miller and colleagues found that the number of U.S. marmoset research colonies jumped from eight in 2009 to 27 today, totaling 1900 marmosets across about 40 principal investigators.Among monkeys, marmosets are known for cooperative social behavior: They call to each other in back-and-forth conversations, and mated pairs share responsibility for rearing young. They’re smaller and easier to house than rhesus macaques, and they give birth twice a year versus once every year or two, aiding multigeneration genetic experiments. Because marmosets mature and age more quickly than bigger monkeys, they speed up studies of diseases that affect development and aging. And a marmoset’s brain is less furrowed than a macaque’s, which makes it easier to image or record activity from its surface.Enthusiasm for marmosets surged in 2009, when they became the first primates shown to pass a genetic modification to offspring in their sperm and eggs. A team at the Central Institute for Experimental Animals (CIEA) in Kawasaki, Japan, injected embryos with the gene for a fluorescent protein. The skin and hair of the resulting animals shone green under ultraviolet light.A series of transgenic marmosets followed—many from CIEA geneticist Erika Sasaki and neuroscientist Hideyuki Okano of Keio University in Tokyo. On 5 November at the Society for Neuroscience meeting in San Diego, their teams will present updates on two transgenic efforts: marmosets with genetic mutations that in humans are linked to Parkinson’s disease and the neurodevelopmental disorder Rett syndrome. Researchers hope that by watching disease progress in a marmoset while analyzing its brain, they can lay bare mechanisms that cause illness in people—and maybe find and test new therapies.Japanese research got a leg up in 2014 with a 40 billion yen ($350 million) government initiative to map the marmoset brain. But several U.S. labs now have transgenic primates under development. In 2016, a team at NIH’s National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, with Sasaki, created marmosets with brain cells that fluoresce when excited—a potential tool for monitoring neural activity. And in April, the first marmoset with a mutation in the gene SHANK3—implicated in some cases of autism—was born at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge.Making transgenic monkeys requires a large colony, in part because females implanted with manipulated embryos don’t always get pregnant. Guoping Feng, who leads the MIT project, estimates the ideal size is at least 300 animals, far more than a single U.S. facility can breed. (Feng’s group has gradually built up a colony of about 200.) When the new transgenic models become widely available—likely in the next few years—labs hoping to use them may also need their own animals for breeding. Attendees at this week’s meeting also discussed ways to maintain genetic diversity within the U.S. marmoset population.But the supply of new marmosets is limited. An international agreement restricts the export of wild animals from their native Brazil. And importing animals from breeding facilities in Asia is “really, really difficult,” Feng says. Most airlines, facing pressure from animal rights groups, have stopped carrying research animals. Already, public resistance to nonhuman primate research is prompting researchers to tread carefully. Increasing interest in marmoset research is “concerning to us,” says Kathleen Conlee, vice president of animal research issues at the Humane Society of the United States here. It’s especially problematic, she says, to genetically design animals that will become ill.But scientists see no substitute for primates in some studies. “When it comes to [studying] cognitive processes and other complex behaviors, some things you just need to do in a primate model,” Joshua Gordon, director of NIH’s National Institute of Mental Health in Bethesda, Maryland, said at a 4 October NASEM meeting on genetically engineered nonhuman primates. The study of mental illness requires an understanding of brain structures that don’t exist in rodents, he added. But such research must consider “the degree to which primate experiments are acceptable to the general public,” he said.Next year, Gordon’s agency plans to announce funding opportunities to support centralized infrastructure for marmoset research. Although details are hazy, the funding might bring in new marmosets, expand or establish breeding colonies, or advance transgenic projects, he said. Its money could come from the federal Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies Initiative or NIH’s Blueprint for Neuroscience Research.In the meantime, labs are improvising. Last month, several investigators launched a virtual pool, to which existing marmoset colonies will contribute 10% of their animals per year for new investigators to buy or inherit. It’s a stopgap to keep up momentum in the field, Miller says, “because it’s kind of a once-in-a-career opportunity.” Why are U.S. neuroscientists clamoring for marmosets?center_img Small and social, marmosets offer advantages for researchers. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Tom Landers/The Boston Globe/Getty Images last_img read more

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Karnataka hand BL Santosh is new BJP organisation general secretary

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first_img bl santosh, bjp general secretary, new bjp general secretary, rss, rashtriya swayamsewak sangh, ramlal, ramlal rss, rss bjp, bjp general secretary, india news, indian express B L Santosh. (Source: ANI)BJP president Amit Shah on Sunday appointed B L Santosh as the new general secretary (organisation) of the party. Santosh replaced Ram Lal, who has returned to the RSS after serving in the post 13 years. Santosh, who had served as Karnataka BJP’s organisation secretary in the past, was national joint secretary (organisation) before his appointment on Sunday. Advertising Govt will identify and deport each illegal immigrant: Amit Shah Advertising Santosh was the party’s general secretary (organisation) in Karnataka for eight years before he was made a national office-bearer in charge of southern states in 2014.A full-time RSS pracharak is appointed to the post of general secretary (organisation) on deputation in the BJP and will coordinate between the RSS and the party. A chemical engineer by qualification, Santosh hails from Dakshina Kannada, but was raised in Bengaluru. He worked as a full-time pracharak in Mysuru and Shimoga districts before becoming the state organisation secretary of the BJP.During the last few years, Santosh had emerged as a power centre within the Karnataka unit of the BJP. His strong stance on issues had strained his relationship with some leaders in the state, including state BJP president and former Chief Minister B S Yeddyurappa, who has publicly expressed his displeasure over Santosh in the past.BJP leaders in Karnataka said it was Santosh who had insisted on denying a ticket to Tejaswini Ananth Kumar, the wife of BJP leader late Ananth Kumar from Bengaluru South and backed young leader Tejasvi Surya, who went on to win the polls. Santosh’s name even came up in the race for the chief minister’s post ahead of the 2018 state polls in Karnataka. What’s changing in NIA: Wider jurisdiction, more offences, faster trial Post Comment(s) Santosh’s appointment to the crucial post comes at a time when the BJP wants to focus on the south as it has so far not been able to make deep inroads into the region, except in Karnataka.On Saturday, Santosh tweeted, “It was 12 years of learning with @Ramlal from 2006. I was deputed to political field along with him. Calm, composed attention to details were his hallmark. He was a father figure to many like me. Back to Sangh work. Wish you all the best ji. We will miss you.”Like his predecessor Ram Lal, Santosh maintains a low profile, but his role in building the BJP’s political base in Karnataka and neighbouring Goa has been lauded by the party leadership. An RSS pracharak with an experience of electoral politics, Santosh is considered a strong ideologue who is well-versed with the poll dynamics. The BJP said in a statement that his appointment comes into effect immediately. Written by Liz Mathew | New Delhi | Published: July 15, 2019 1:52:20 am Related News Centre will identify illegal immigrants and deport them: Amit Shah in Rajya Sabha last_img read more

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G2 Crowd VP Heather Reed Go After the Prize

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first_imgVivian Wagner has been an ECT News Network reporter since 2008. Her main areas of focus are technology, business, CRM, e-commerce, privacy, security, arts, culture and diversity. She has extensive experience reporting on business and technology for a varietyof outlets, including The Atlantic, The Establishment and O, The Oprah Magazine. She holds a PhD in English with a specialty in modern American literature and culture. She received a first-place feature reporting award from the Ohio Society of Professional Journalists.Email Vivian. G2 Crowd VP Heather ReedTechNewsWorld: Could you describe the trajectory of your career? How did you get where you are today?Heather Reed: My first job was at a Ben & Jerry’s ice cream shop in San Diego. Eventually, instead of just scooping ice cream, they made me responsible for the franchise operation. A lot of times people look at my career path as being that of a salesperson, but I look at it as one that’s been on a management track. That’s where it started.I knew that I really liked the operations and management piece of it, but knew I didn’t want to be covered with ice cream for the rest of my life. I worked for a while at an upscale retirement community, doing marketing, and from there, I kept diving into various industries.After leaving T-Mobile, I moved into a startup B2B event management and marketing company, working right alongside the tech sector. That’s where I got my toes wet in the tech sector and grew passionate about it, and eventually made the transition to G2 Crowd.TNW: I’ve read that you sold Girl Scout cookies when you were younger. What did that experience teach you about sales and the business world?Reed: That’s the very early stage of finding something I was passionate about. Back then it was a competition to get a stuffed manatee, and boy did that fuel my fire. That was when I first got the taste of selling things.I learned that what you get out of something is a direct result of the effort you put into it. I really wanted the prize, and so I went after it and sold as many of those boxes as I could.TNW: You’ve spoken before about the importance of using gender-inclusive language in the workplace. Why do you think this kind of inclusivity is an important goal?Reed: It helps us get away from the silos we put people in. By using gender-neutral terms, we might change people’s minds about what jobs they’re qualified for and have a chance of getting. Getting rid of gender-biased terms helps level the playing field.TNW: How do you define gender-inclusive language?Reed: I think it’s a lot of things. It’s as simple as not using he/she pronouns when you’re talking about certain roles, or saying “salesperson” instead of “salesman.” It starts there.I also think that there are different phrases that we use and don’t even think about it, like “right-hand man,” or “manning up,” or “chatty Kathy.” We need to be cognizant of the subtle implications those terms have.It goes beyond that as well, to the language we’re using when coaching people. As a strong woman, I’ve been told I can be “intimidating,” but my male counterparts are called “assertive.” We need to be aware of how we’re using words, and what other constructive terms we can use.TNW: Do you see gender dynamics in the workplace evolving over time? What’s in the future?Reed: I wish I had a crystal ball. I don’t know. I think we’ve evolved a fair amount. I’ve been in the workforce over 20 years, and I’ve seen some shifts in the workplace. We have made headway, and the fact that it is a somewhat regular conversation means we’re pushing in the right direction.One term I don’t like is “girlboss.” I started thinking about it when a former female colleague and I were the only two women on the leadership team. We stepped out of the office after a rough week. We were sitting there joking that we were boss babes. With her and I together, it was empowering. But in hindsight, it’s challenging for me.As much as it was a private conversation, when terms like that are used around a mixed gender audience, it can be a slippery slope. Are we perpetuating gender distinctions by using these terms? At some point, leaders are leaders. We want these things to be leveled out. To some extent, the “girl” or “female” labels might be perpetuating the situation.TNW: Would you recommend the use of the term “woman-owned business”?Reed: We highlight minority- and women-owned businesses. There’s a time and a place for things. I think it depends on the context in which it’s being promoted.TNW: Do you think women bring a unique style to the workplace?Reed: I don’t think that any two people are the same. I think that management style is individual to the person. Gender may to some extent play a role in that, but it has a lot more to do with the individual, what their passions and strengths are.TNW: What is your advice for young girls and women who might be interested in pursuing tech-related careers?Reed: Don’t let anyone scare you or stand in your way. If it’s something you’re truly passionate about, back yourself in the pursuit of that. That’s something I’ve always done: trusted my gut.If you want something, go after it. Don’t shrink in the back of the room. Don’t be afraid to have a voice or an opinion. Be proud of the experiences you’ve had. The sky’s the limit. That’s how my parents raised me, and that’s what got me where I am today. My advice to young women pursuing careers that are traditionally male-dominated is to go after it. You’re the trendsetter. Heather Reed is VP of business development for G2 Crowd, which offers a business software review platform designed to bring transparency to business-to-business buying.In this exclusive interview, Reed discusses the problem with the use of terms like “girlboss” and the importance of gender inclusivity in the workplace.last_img read more

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Researchers uncover mechanisms that prevent tooth replacement in mice

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first_img Source:https://www.kcl.ac.uk/ Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Feb 20 2019Most reptiles and fish have multiple sets of teeth during their lifetime. However, most mammals, such as humans, have only one set of replacement teeth and some mammals, like mice, have only a single set with no replacement. This diversity raises both evolutionary questions – how did different tooth replacement strategies evolve? – and developmental ones – which mechanisms prevent replacement teeth in animals that lost them?In a new paper in Development, Professor Abigail Tucker and PhD student Elena Popa of King’s College London tackle these questions with a molecular analysis of mouse tooth development. They have pinpointed why mice don’t have replacement teeth by comparing gene expression in the dental lamina, the area that forms the teeth, of the mouse and the minipig, which has two sets of teeth.Related StoriesResearchers hope to develop electronic “replacement fish”Brush your teeth and use floss to slow down Alzheimer’sHealth benefit from substituting red and processed meat with fishWnt signaling is known to be required for tooth replacement in other vertebrates; the researchers from King’s Faculty of Dentistry, Oral & Craniofacial Sciences now show that Wnt activity is absent in a rudimentary form of the dental lamina (RSDL) in mice. This structure forms in the mouse but then disappears, stopping the generation of another set of teeth.Using sophisticated genetic techniques, the researchers activated Wnt signaling in the mouse RSDL at E15.5 and E16 stages of development, revitalizing this structure, and additional teeth were formed as a consequence.These results demonstrate the potential of the RSDL as a source for replacement teeth in mice, and provide an experimental system suitable for studying the mechanisms behind replacement.”Why the potential for tooth replacement varies so much across vertebrates is an intriguing question”, explains PhD student Elena Popa. “Our results show that, although the mouse normally does not form a second replacement set of teeth, it still has the potential to do so given the right signals.”Finally, they report that culturing the RSDL in isolation stimulated its tooth-forming potential, suggesting that the first generation of teeth might prevent replacement teeth from developing; the previous set of teeth also influence the development of a next set.Professor Tucker explains: “This is relevant to human tooth replacement, as structures similar to the RSDL have been identified next to the permanent teeth during development. In normal development of our teeth, therefore, the second set or permanent tooth may inhibit the generation of a third set of teeth.”These results provide a conceptual advancement in the tooth-replacement field, as well as providing new insights into how traits are lost during mammalian evolution and how they might be restored.last_img read more

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£18 million award to boost Crohns disease research

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first_img Source:https://www.ed.ac.uk/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Apr 15 2019An international philanthropic trust has awarded significant funding to aid scientists’ understanding of the currently incurable condition known as Crohn’s disease.The £1.8 million award to the University of Edinburgh will help improve how experts monitor and determine outcomes for the inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that affects some 120,000 people in the UK.The disease leads to painful inflammation and ulcers forming on the lining of the gut, with many patients having to undergo multiple operations during their lifetime.Funding comes from The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust – a US-based charity committed to improving lives.Helmsley’s Crohn’s Disease Program aims to find a cure for the disease and to enhance patients’ quality of life.Related StoriesOlympus Europe and Cytosurge join hands to accelerate drug development, single cell researchOlympus launches next-generation X Line objectives for clinical, research applicationsComplement system shown to remove dead cells in retinitis pigmentosa, contradicting previous researchThe Helmsley Charitable Trust typically does not accept unsolicited applications and instead identifies research worldwide of exceptionally high standard. This is one of the first projects in Scotland to be funded by Helmsley.Research will be focused on finding out more about mitochondria – tiny parts of our cells that are key to providing our bodies with energy. Mitochondria are believed to have evolved from bacteria around 2-3 billion years ago.In IBD, mitochondria have been found to give off ‘danger signals’ that immune cells confuse with bacteria, leading them to trigger an unintended and harmful inflammatory responses.The project aims to find out if these danger signals could be used to develop a simple, non-invasive test, using blood or stool, which can show if the inflamed bowel wall has healed after treatment. Currently, the only way to determine healing is by using invasive colonoscopy.Researchers will investigate if this simple non-invasive test could allow doctors and patients to forecast how patients’ are progressing, which could speed the search for new therapies. It could also help doctors spot different forms of Crohn’s and develop personalized treatments.Dr Gwo-Tzer Ho, of the University of Edinburgh’s Centre for Inflammation Research, who is leading the study, said: “I am honored to receive this award, which is a reflection on the team’s efforts to understand the role of mitochondria in IBD. We are very hopeful that our work will lead to better tools to predict how the disease affects patients, which could ultimately lead to improvements in their treatment and quality of life.”Dr Garabet Yeretssian, Director of the Helmsley Charitable Trust’s Crohn’s Disease Program said: “Addressing the unmet medical needs of people with Crohn’s disease is at the center of our Program’s mission. The team at Edinburgh has a tremendous opportunity to create simple diagnostic tools necessary to transform the standard of care for Crohn’s disease patients.”last_img read more

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GPs prompted more than 5 million times to encourage selfcare rather than

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first_img Source:FDB (First Databank) By working with practices across the country, we recognise the need for accurate, actionable information when prescribing decisions are being made. Using technology to remind GPs of ever evolving prescribing policy, including that around self-care and appropriate medication decisions, and ensuring that this is patient-specific, means that practice prescribers can rapidly access information that is appropriate for their patients. They can then make informed prescribing decisions that benefit the patient and the practice. From just one year’s worth of data, we can see the tremendous impact that such information can have.” A national analysis of how practices in two thirds of England’s CCGs use a prescribing decision support technology called OptimiseRx found that thousands of professionals had been acting on the alerts, helping prescribers to comply with self-care prescribing guidelines from NHS England. Published in April 2018, the guidance recommends that practices should promote self-care when appropriate to reduce costs, discouraging prescriptions for medications such as vitamin and mineral supplements, antifungal treatments, and laxatives for minor illnesses.The news follows the finding last year that GPs across the country had saved at least £100m by responding to alerts to prescribe alternative and lower cost medicines for patients.The technology works in practice by enabling the presentation of NHS prescribing guidance and alerting GPs, at the point of prescribing, in their existing clinical IT system when over counter medicines should not be routinely prescribed, and where self-care is more appropriate.Analysis conducted between April 2018 to the end of March 2019 showed that 5 million such alerts were sent to prescribers, resulting in avoided costs to the NHS of over £10 million. This is helping to achieve NHS Long Term Plan ambitions of reducing prescribing costs by more than £200m a year and is helping to tackle wider national priorities such as over-prescribing.Related StoriesPerspectives on how to communicate to older adults about stopping cancer screeningEven when HIV prevention drug is covered, other costs block treatmentResearchers analyze link between videogame addiction and school inadaptationNHS England’s 2018 guidance also looked to reduce the use of medications with limited clinical evidence, such as probiotics. It also highlighted NHS England-funded medicines that should be referred to secondary care, for conditions including cancer and cystic fibrosis, which are not to be prescribed in primary care. By using OptimiseRx to comply with the guidance, GPs have in total saved more than £10m in the last year alone.The technology has traditionally been used to help GPs make decisions that comply with local and national prescribing priorities. This includes alerting doctors when more cost-effective alternatives are available, and by providing patient-specific prescribing recommendations based on the patient’s record.Darren Nichols, Managing Director, FDB comments:center_img Jun 12 2019GPs and other prescribers have been prompted more than 5 million times in the last 12 months to encourage patients to take action to look after themselves, rather than relying on medication from their doctor.last_img read more

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