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Countdown: The Top 50 Musical Theater Songs of Andrew Lloyd Webber

By on January 18, 2021

first_img32. “Where Did the Rock Go” from School of Rock(Lyrics by Glenn Slater) Rosalie Mullins finally lets her hair down. Performed by Sierra Boggess. 24. “Heaven on Their Minds” from Jesus Christ Superstar(Lyrics by Tim Rice) Judas’ ultimate betrayal is nicely set up in this early JCS rocker. Performed by Alan Doggett and Murray Head. 49. “Starlight Express: Megamix” from Starlight Express(Lyrics by Richard Stilgoe) Finding a spot for Lloyd Webber’s tuneful but lightweight choo-choo-sical, which has delighted countless kids around the world for over 30 years, on the list is tough, but we’ll give a nod to the joyful megamix. Performed by the West End cast. 18. “Love Changes Everything” from Aspects of Love(Lyrics by Don Black and Charles Hart) The theme song to perhaps ALW’s most romantic show. Performed below by the original Broadway cast below in a special Tony Awards number that brilliantly boils down the bed-bouncing plot in three minutes. 22. “Sunset Boulevard” from Sunset Boulevard(Lyrics by Don Black and Christopher Hampton) With a melody like a grand Hollywood film score, this acerbic Joe Gillis solo is perfection. Performed by Alan Campbell. 8. “Tell Me on a Sunday” from Song & Dance/Tell Me on a Sunday(Lyrics by Don Black) Cause if you’re gonna break my heart, do it somewhere pretty. Performed by Bernadette Peters. 36. “Close Every Door” from Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat(Lyrics by Tim Rice) A stirring ballad for Joseph, locked up for a crime he didn’t commit. Performed by Bill Hutton. 17. “Another Suitcase in Another Hall” from Evita(Lyrics by Tim Rice) Peron’s Mistress gets just five minutes of stage time, but with this song, it’s well spent. Performed by Madonna, whose Eva snatched the song in the film, and Antonio Banderas. 11. “Beneath A Moonless Sky” from Love Never Dies(Lyrics by Glenn Slater) Secrets are unveiled in this lush Phantom/Christine reunion from the sequel. Performed by Ramin Kaminloo and Sierra Boggess. 20. “The Phantom of the Opera” from The Phantom of the Opera(Lyrics by Charles Hart) The synthesized classic that’s been rocking Broadway for almost 30 years. Performed by Sarah Brightman and Michael Crawford. Andrew Lloyd Webber(Photo: Emilio Madrid-Kuser) 39. “Mr. Mistoffelees” from Cats(Lyrics by T. S. Eliot) Another great cat jam that we dare you to get out of your head. Performed by Terrence Mann, Timothy Scott and the original Broadway cast. 12. “Unexpected Song” from Song & Dance/Tell Me on a Sunday(Lyrics by Don Black) No song better captures the dizzy thrill of finding love. Performed by Bernadette Peters. 37. “You’re In the Band” from School of Rock(Lyrics by Glenn Slater) Yes, the Lord can still rock out! Performed by Alex Brightman and the original Broadway cast. 9. “Love Never Dies” from Love Never Dies(Lyrics by Glenn Slater) Christine Daae, in full diva mode. Performed by Sierra Boggess and Andrew Lloyd Webber. 31. “A New Argentina” from Evita(Lyrics by Tim Rice) The epic torch- and sign-waving Act One finale. Performed by Bob Gunton, Patti LuPone, Mandy Patinkin and the original Broadway cast. 38. “Once Upon Another Time” from Love Never Dies(Lyrics by Glenn Slater) One of several gorgeous duets from the Phantom sequel, here stripped down with original stars Ramin Karimloo and Sierra Boggess. 13. “All I Ask of You” from The Phantom of the Opera(Lyrics by Charles Hart) The go-to ALW love duet never disappoints. Performed by Sarah Brightman and Steve Barton. View Comments 2. “Wishing You Were Somehow Here Again” from The Phantom of the Opera(Lyrics by Charles Hart) Christine Daae longs for her dead daddy in this heartbreaker. Performed by Sierra Boggess. 45. “Everything’s Alright” from Jesus Christ Superstar(Lyrics by Tim Rice) Mary Magdelene is so chill. Performed by Ben Forster, Melanie C. and Tim Minchin. 27. “Think of Me” from The Phantom of the Opera(Lyrics by Charles Hart) Christine Daae takes the spotlight. Performed by Sarah Brightman. Show Closed This production ended its run on June 25, 2017 28. “Stick It to the Man” from School of Rock(Lyrics by Glenn Slater) A rabble-rousing anthem. Performed by Alex Brightman and the original Broadway cast. 47. “Whistle Down the Wind” from Whistle Down the Wind(Lyrics by Jim Steinman) The haunting title song from the London hit, still never seen on Broadway. Premiered here by Sarah Brightman with ALW on the keys.  41. “Masquerade” from The Phantom of the Opera(Lyrics by Charles Hart) A dazzling party sequence that manages to be fabulous and terrifying all at once. Performed by the original London cast. 40. “The Perfect Year” from Sunset Boulevard(Lyrics by Don Black and Christopher Hampton) Norma Desmond gets all dolled up to sing this pretty New Year’s eve toast to her hot new friend. Performed by Glenn Close and Alan Campbell.  5. “With One Look” from Sunset Boulevard(Lyrics by Don Black and Christopher Hampton) “All you need to know” about Norma Desmond in one unforgettable solo. Performed by Barbra Streisand. 35. “Superstar” from Jesus Christ Superstar(Lyrics by Tim Rice) Judas’ recap rocker. Performed by Keith Burns and the 20th Anniversary London cast.center_img 44. “The Rum Tum Tugger” from Cats(Lyrics by T. S. Eliot) Go on, try to resist the sexy kitty rock star. Performed by Terrence Mann.  48. “Macavity: The Mystery Cat” from Cats(Lyrics by T. S. Eliot) The sexiest song about a cat ever written. Performed by Carmen Cusack. 7. “Gethsemane (I Only Want to Say)” from Jesus Christ Superstar(Lyrics by Tim Rice) Jesus, in fact, has a lot to say. Performed by Paul Nolan. Sunset Boulevard 4. “Don’t Cry for Me, Argentina” from Evita(Lyrics by Tim Rice) Eva on the balcony of the Casa Rosada in the white ballgown. Classic. Performed by Elaine Paige. 30. “Any Dream Will Do” from Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat(Lyrics by Tim Rice) This chart-topper is one of ALW’s most recognizable tunes. Performed by Donny Osmond.  16. “Jellicle Songs for Jellicle Cats” from Cats(Lyrics by T. S. Eliot, Richard Stilgoe and Trevor Nunn) Never gets old. Performed by the cast of the home video version. 15. “And the Money Kept Rolling In (And Out)” from Evita(Lyrics by Tim Rice) A rousing showstopper for Che and the people of Argentina. Performed by Mandy Patinkin and the original Broadway cast. 33. “All for Laura” from The Woman in White(Lyrics by David Zippel) Never underestimate a sister’s devotion. Performed by Maria Friedman. 42. “Rainbow High” from Evita(Lyrics by Tim Rice) Christian Dior her! Eva Peron is ready to hit the road! Performed by Patti LuPone. 1. “As If We Never Said Goodbye” from Sunset Boulevard(Lyrics by Don Black and Christopher Hampton) Norma Desmond back at Paramount: the ultimate theatrical moment, the ultimate ALW song. And the perfect showcase for many a stage star in a turban…Patti LuPone premiered the role in London’s West End.Five months later, Glenn Close opened the show in LA, ultimately bringing it to Broadway.Betty Buckley replaced both LuPone in London and Close on Broadway.And finally, ALW regular Elaine Paige, who played the part both in the West End and on Broadway. 43. “Evermore Without You” from The Woman in White(Lyrics by David Zippel) In Victorian England, Walter thinks the love of his life, Laura, is dead. (Spoiler: she’s not). Performed by Martin Crewes.   6. “The Music of the Night” from The Phantom of the Opera(Lyrics by Charles Hart) Where “seductive” and “psycho” come together beautifully. Performed by Michael Crawford. 14. “‘Til I Hear You Sing” from Love Never Dies(Lyrics by Glenn Slater) Holed up in Coney Island, the Phantom is missing Christine Daae something bad. Performed by Ramin Karimloo. 10. “Buenos Aires” from Evita(Lyrics by Tim Rice) A firecracker of a number, filled with the energy of youth and determination. Performed by Patti LuPone. 34. “The Point of No Return” from The Phantom of the Opera(Lyrics by Charles Hart) Have the Phantom and Christine ever been hotter together? Performed by Gerard Butler and Emmy Rossum. 25. “Too Much in Love to Care” from Sunset Boulevard(Lyrics by Don Black and Christopher Hampton) Friends turn lovers with this sweeping duet, sung here by original Broadway stars Alice Ripley and Alan Campbell. 46. “Hand Me the Wine and the Dice” from Aspects of Love(Lyrics by Don Black and Charles Hart) A rousing funeral song about living life to the fullest. Performed by Kathleen Rowe McAllen.  21. “Anything But Lonely” from Aspects of Love(Lyrics by Don Black/Charles Hart) In this 11 o’clock number, Rose promises to always find a body to keep her warm. Performed by Sarah Brightman. 3. “Memory” from Cats(Lyrics by T. S. Eliot and Trevor Nunn) The glamour cat gets her moment in the sun. Performed by Betty Buckley. 26. “The First Man You Remember” from Aspects of Love(Lyrics by Don Black and Charles Hart) A sweet ballad, sung from father to daughter. Performed by Kevin Colson and Diana Morrison. 29. “Nothing Like You’ve Ever Known” from Song & Dance/Tell Me on a Sunday(Lyrics by Don Black) The ultimate breaking-up-with-a-married-man moment. Performed by Bernadette Peters. 23. “No Matter What” from Whistle Down the Wind(Lyrics by Jim Steinman) This children’s song onstage became a smash for the boyband Boyzone, with this music video earning over 16 million YouTube views (and growing!). Related Shows 19. “I Don’t Know How to Love Him” from Jesus Christ Superstar(Lyrics by Tim Rice) He scares her so, she wants him so, she loves him so. Performed by Yvonne Elliman.  With The Phantom of the Opera, School of Rock, Cats and now Sunset Boulevard on the boards, Andrew Lloyd Webber has made history, tying with Rodgers and Hammerstein’s record of having four shows running at once on Broadway. The spotlight is on the British bigwig, so it seems fitting to look back on his incredible career and rank his 50 best musical theater songs (we did the same for R&H and Lloyd Webber’s birthday buddy Stephen Sondheim in 2015). His catalog presents unique challenges; although there’s a very recognizable “Andrew Lloyd Webber sound,” which mostly indicates lush romantic ballads, the composer is actually a master of many musical sounds, and his scores include a wide range of atmospheres and tones. There have been many musical partners to name since his early successes with lyricist Tim Rice. To make our list, we simply highlighted the show songs that have stayed with us the most through his fruitful career. Sorry, fans of lesser-known Lloyd Webber shows like The Likes of Us, By Jeeves and The Beautiful Game—although they all contain gems, the competition was too tough to make the top 50!50. “Seeing Is Believing” from Aspects of Love(Lyrics by Don Black and Charles Hart) In this lush duet, actress Rose and young fan Alex fall in love during a sleepy train ride. Performed by Michael Ball and Ann Crumb.last_img read more

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Paul Alexander Nolan Set to Star in Broadway-Aimed Escape to Margaritaville

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first_img View Comments Escape to Margaritaville Paul Alexander Nolan will sink his teeth into a starring role (and perhaps a cheeseburger in paradise?) in the Broadway-aimed Jimmy Buffett musical Escape to Margaritaville. The Bright Star standout will headline the production’s world premiere at La Jolla Playhouse. He is set to play Tully, a part-time bartender and singer. Broadway alums Alison Luff and Lisa Howard will take on the roles of Rachel and Tammy, respectively. Performances of the Christopher Ashley-helmed musical are scheduled to begin on May 9. As previously announced, a Great White Way opening is slated for spring 2018.Nolan’s Broadway credits include Chicago, Doctor Zhivago, Jesus Christ Superstar and Once. Luff was last seen on the Great White Way in Les Misérables; she also appeared in Matilda, Scandalous and Ghost. Howard last appeared on Broadway in It Shoulda Been You. Her additional Great White Way credits include Priscilla Queen of the Desert, 9 to 5, South Pacific and The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee.The new show will feature Buffett’s classic hits, as well as original songs from the singer/songwriter. The story, crafted by book writers Greg Garcia and Mike O’Malley, follows a Nolan’s character Tully at the titular tropical island resort as he questions his relaxed ways upon meeting (and falling in love with) a career-minded tourist.The La Jolla engagement is scheduled to run through June 25. The production will then go to New Orleans’ Saenger Theatre from October 20 through 28. Performances at Houston’s Hobby Center will run from October 31 through November 5. The Chicago stint is set for November 9 through December 3. Further casting will be announced at a later date. Related Showscenter_img Paul Alexander Nolan(Photo: Emilio Madrid-Kuser) Show Closed This production ended its run on July 1, 2018last_img read more

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4-H Congress 1996

By on January 17, 2021

first_imgIt is a dream that began when Shu Che joined 4-H in the fifth grade. And it’s about tocome true.She’s headed to Atlanta for State 4-H Congress.”I’m very excited,” said Che, a student at Morrow High School.Che will compete against 4-H’ers from across Georgia in the performing arts(instrumental) project. That’s usually one of the largest, most hotly contested projectareas. She will play two pieces on the flute.”This summer I’m a counselor at Jekyll Island 4-H camp,” she said. “I’vebeen so busy, but I make time to practice. The camping hours are around the clock, but Ifind time to go over sections of my pieces and what I need to work on.”Che competed several other times at District Project Achievement, the second level ofcompetition, but not in performing arts. She tried bicycle safety and general recreationfirst. Winning first place at DPA earns a 4-H’er the right to attend State Congress.”This was my first year as a senior 4-H’er to compete (in performing arts),”she said. “I was really surprised I placed at all.”More than 300 4-H’ers from across the state will vie for state winners’ ribbons in 49project areas at the Congress, Aug. 12-15 at the Holiday Inn Crowne Plaza in Atlanta.The 4-H’ers who finish on top at State Congress will head for the National 4-H Congressin Memphis, Tenn., Nov. 29 through Dec. 4.Che is hoping that with a little help from Mozart and Kennan, she will be one of them.”Since I’m a high school senior, this is my last chance to win,” she said.”I hope to win so I know I will have accomplished something great.”State winners become members of the Georgia Master 4-H Club. “Mastering is one ofthe highest honors to me,” Che said. “Then I know I have achieved the nextstep.”The achievement is not only great for the 4-H’ers, but also for the Extension Servicecounty agents who helped them get there. Che’s Clayton County agent, Laura Garrett, hasseveral 4-H’ers attending State Congress.”I’m really proud,” Garrett said. “Shu really did it herself. She gother record book together and just did it.”Each competitor must prepare a portfolio-type record of their work, in addition to ademonstration, in the project area. The portfolio and an interview based on it count halfof the competition score.After the competition, the 4-H’ers go on corporate tours to meet Atlanta businessleaders in their project areas. They also meet key state government officials.”State 4-H Congress is a chance for us to showcase the outstanding youth we’reworking with in Georgia 4-H,” said Dan Aamoth, extension 4-H specialist and Congresscoordinator.”This also gives us the opportunity to expose them to the business community andstate leaders, and to send them on their way as better prepared young adults,” hesaid.last_img read more

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Post-holiday Dieters

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first_imgDon’t skip meals or cut out broad groups such as breads or fats, she said. Make little changes,such as cutting out the chips or the extra margarine. Crawley said the body’s natural appetite controls don’t work if you’re inactive. “Your bodydoesn’t know when to stop eating,” she said. “If you want to be a healthy weight, you have toexercise.” “That’s probably not the best way to determine your ideal weight,” she said. “A healthyweight for you is whatever you weigh when you eat a healthy, balanced diet and exerciseregularly.” “Go back to your normal, healthy eating habits,” Crawley said. “Eat three moderate meals aday and allow time for rebalancing your diet.” “The problem is that people want to cut out whole food groups,” she said. “But you alwaysneed a balanced, healthy diet of foods in all groups.” “Unfortunately,” she said, “another study asked dieters how much weight loss would makethem happy, satisfied or disappointed, and the most common ‘disappointed’ response was 15percent or less.” After a week or more of your normal life-style, you’ll get a more reliable count of the poundsyou’ve gained. “Setting too high a weight-loss goal leads to discouragement,” Crawley said. “It makes youput off changes, such as buying new clothes that fit. But weight loss is difficult. You need toreward yourself — with things that aren’t food. No diet will be successful if you don’t feelgood about yourself.” Many dieters focus on fats. And trimming dietary fats can be important. But don’t try toeliminate them. “A totally fat-free diet would not be good for you,” Crawley said. “Fats makefat-soluble vitamins available to you, and they make your diet more satisfying.” A reasonable weight-loss goal, she said, should be no more than 15 percent of your pre-lossweight. If you want to lose more than that, make 15 percent your goal anyway. Once you losethat weight and stabilize there, then you can re-evaluate. Once dieters have lost that 10 percent to 15 percent, though, most are satisfied. “They feelbetter, and they realize how hard that weight loss was,” she said.center_img Americans tend to eat too many fats, she said. The general rule is that fats should be no morethan 30 percent of the calories you eat. “But that percentage varies from person to person,” shesaid. The so-called ideal weights from charts sometimes lead people to set unrealistic weight-lossgoals, Crawley said. “Studies have shown that dieters are most successful in losing only 10percent to 15 percent of their pre-loss weight,” she said. Crawley isn’t a stickler for the “ideal weights” on height-weight charts. As soon as the overindulging ends, holiday frolickers swarm into commercial weight-losscenters or starve themselves at home, intent on shedding the pounds they’ve gained. A University of Georgia expert says that’s the wrong approach. Even if you didn’t hold back in your holiday eating, use restraint in your post-holiday diet,said Connie Crawley. She’s an Extension Service food, nutrition and health specialist with theUGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences. Exercise is a critical part of weight loss, too. “Include weight training, aerobics and stretchingin your regular activities,” she said. “To lose weight, you need to exercise five to seven days aweek.” The healthiest choice, she said, is to monitor what you eat, not what you weigh. “Food diariesare the No. 1 way to keep your weight down,” she said. “Then you can decide what little things to do to get the weight back off,” she said.last_img read more

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New Fat Limits.

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first_imgThe U.S. Food and Drug Administration has proposed limits on trans fat on several nutrient content claims found on food labels. Restrictions on trans fat would change the nutrient content claims as follows:* “Low saturated fat” claims would be permitted only when there is less than 0.5 grams of trans fat per serving and 1 gram or less of saturated fat.* “Reduced saturated fat” claims would be permitted only when there is at least 25 percent less saturated fat and trans fat combined and at least 25 percent less saturated fat.* Cholesterol claims would be permitted only on food containing 2 grams or less of saturated fat and trans fat combined.* “Lean” claims would be permitted when, besides meeting limits on total fat and cholesterol, the food contains 4.5 grams or less of saturated fat and trans fat combined.* “Extra lean” claims would be permitted when, besides meeting limits on total fat and cholesterol, the food contains less than 2 grams of saturated fat and trans fat combined.* The proposed new “Trans fat free” claim would be permitted in the labeling of foods that contain less than 0.5 grams of trans fat and less than 0.5 grams saturated fat per serving.* Foods with more than 4 grams of saturated fat and trans fat combined per serving would also not be able to carry health claims related to sodium, hypertension, calcium, osteoporosis, etc.However, such foods’ labels would be permitted to bear nutrient content claims (e.g. “low sodium”) if they also have the statement, “See nutrition information for saturated fat content.”The FDA is seeking comments on the proposed rule. The proposal is on the Internet at www.access.gpo.gov/su_docs/. Submit written comments by April 17 to Dockets Management Branch, HFA-305, Food and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane, Room 1061, Rockville, MD 20852.last_img read more

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Tailgate food safety

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first_imgBy April ReeseUniversity of GeorgiaGeorgia’s football season is in full swing, and football teams drawfans and foods to the stadium on game day. But without properconcern for safety, the food can leave fans sick in the stands.Elizabeth Andress, an extension food safety specialist with theUniversity of Georgia College of Family and Consumer Sciences,warns people of the health risks of tailgating.”Tailgate parties are a perfect opportunity for there to betemperature abuse of foods,” Andress said. “People should payclose attention to make sure cold foods are staying cold enoughand hot foods are heated to the right temperatures so peopledon’t perish with food-borne illness.”Cold foods should be coldThe cold foods shouldn’t be just cool. “People need to make sure they’re packing really good-quality coolers with plenty of ice or frozen gel packs,” Andress said. “All the food in your cooler needs to stay at 40 degrees Fahrenheit or below.”It’s possible to keep food in the cold safety zone, she said, ifyou pack properly. “Thoroughly chill cold items before you putthem into the cooler,” she said. Gel packs are good for coolers, she said, because they warm upvery slowly once out of the freezer.”Check the temperature of foods in the cooler often to make surethey’re cold enough,” she said. “Discard perishable foods thathave been in the temperature danger zone, from 40 to 140 degreesFahrenheit, for more than two hours,” Andress said.Keep raw and read-to-eat separateIn safely packing coolers, keep raw foods separate from ready-to-eat foods they can contaminate. Do this from the storeto the tailgate.”This means keeping foods separate in the grocery cart,refrigerator and cooler,” Andress said. “Pack raw foods belowcooked foods in the cooler with some kind of separation betweenthem.”She suggests using one cooler for drinks and snacks and anotherfor raw foods and using separate cutting boards, utensils andplates for raw and cooked foods.People often get sick, too, from not cooking hamburgers, chicken,or even hotdogs well enough, she said.Chicken is a popular food for tailgating, and raw chicken hasSalmonella bacteria on it that can easily be transferred ontoother foods.”Problems can arise when the bacteria transfers to foods likerolls or vegetables, because those foods may not even getcooked,” Andress said.Don’t use color as an indicatorA common misconception is that you can rely on colors to tell howdone a piece of meat is.”People … tend to go by whether juices run clear or the insideis no longer pink,” Andress said. “These aren’t good indicatorsthat important bacteria like E. coli 0157 are no longer present.”She recommends a better way to check foods on the grill. “One ofthe best investments you can make to prevent food-borne illnessis to invest in a thermometer,” Andress said. “Hamburgers shouldbe heated to at least 160 degrees F before eating them andchicken to 180 degrees F.” An important step in avoiding food-borne illnesses is to besafely clean.Wash hands frequently”It’s hard to be clean at a tailgate party or picnic, but it’simportant to wash hands before and after handling foods,” Andresssaid. “Be sure to take something with you to be prepared forcleaning up utensils or anywhere you are actually setting fooditems.”Andress said some of the most common food-borne illnesses arerelated to people passing diseases to each other due to uncleanhands.”Staph poisoning is very common,” Andress said. “We all haveStaphylococcus bacteria on us, and without properly cleaninghands and utensils, we can pass them from person to food. Oncedeposited on food, Staph bacteria can multiply and produce toxinsif the food is in the temperature danger zone for too long.”last_img read more

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Pampas plumes

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first_imgPampas grass can be a very attractive and functional plant when used correctly in landscapes. Because it grows rapidly into a massive plant, pampas grass is an excellent screening plant for sunny locations. It can also be used as a specimen plant in isolated locations in large lawns.A large perennial grass native to Brazil, Argentina and Chile, pampas grass (Cortaderia selloana) grows in large clumps 8- to 10-feet high. Unfortunately, pampas grass is often incorrectly used as a foundation plant. It is purchased from a nursery as a small plant and planted close to homes. The plant will look great the first year, but after several years it grows so large that it blocks the view of the home. In addition to blocking views, pampas grass can cut those who come in contact with it. When selecting sites for pampas grass, consider the danger to passersby from contact with the very sharp, saw-like edges of the leaves. CarePampas grass should be planted where it will receive full sun most of the day. In shady areas, it will grow very slowly and usually will not produce plumes.Once pampas grass is established, it is practically trouble free. There is no need to spray for insects or any other pests. It will grow in most soils and responds favorably to frequent fertilization. To obtain good growth and plume production, pampas grass should be fertilized four times a year with a complete fertilizer (10-10-10) at a rate of 2 pounds per 100 square feet. Before new growth begins in the spring, prune away any brown leaves and dead materials that accumulate at the plant base. If winter is particularly harsh and a great deal of browning has occurred, the entire plant can be rejuvenated by cutting it back to within 2 feet of ground level with lopping shears or a chain saw. Move slowly and wear jeans, a long-sleeve shirt and gloves when pruning pampas grass. Again, the sharp leaf blades will cut hands, arms, legs and other unprotected parts of the body.PlumesIn late summer, pampas grass produces silvery white or pinkish silken plumes that raise the plant’s height to 12 feet. Female plants produce plumes that are broad and full due to silky hairs covering the tiny flowers. Male plumes appear narrow and thin because of the absence of hair on the flowers. The difference in appearance is not obvious at first glance.Pampas grass plumes are highly prized for indoor decorations. Plumes used for decorating should be cut as soon as they have fully emerged. They can be used in dried arrangements immediately after harvesting or dried by hanging upside down for later use. If mature plumes are brought indoors, their delicate fluffy flowers can become a bigger problem than a shedding dog or cat. To prevent shedding, spray mature plumes with hair spray. Striking feathery plumes combined with large, graceful clumps of foliage make pampas grass an interesting addition to most landscapes when planted in the right location.last_img read more

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Green Jacket

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first_imgGeorgia 4-H’s annual Green Jacket Award goes to a public official who has shown exceptional support for Georgia’s young people. This year that honor went to Paul Wood, president and CEO of Georgia Electric Membership Corporation (EMC). Wood accepted his new, verdant blazer and an etched glass award at the 2015 Georgia 4-H State Congress Awards Banquet on Thursday, July 23, amongst dozens of young people and Georgia 4-H staff also there to be honored for their accomplishments. Georgia 4-H’s state leadership team presents the Green Jacket Award annually to supporters of the Georgia 4-H program. Former winners include Gov. Sonny Perdue, Rep. Terry England, University System of Georgia Chancellor Hank Huckaby and other public figures. “Paul Wood has been a friend of 4-H since his arrival in Georgia,” said Georgia 4-H State Leader Arch Smith. “He has supported our program through his service on the Georgia 4-H Foundation board of directors. Under his leadership, the Georgia EMCs have continued to strengthen their legacy as one of Georgia 4-H’s best supporters. Georgia 4-H has no better friend than Paul Wood, and he is most deserving of the Georgia 4-H Green Jacket Award.” Wood, who spearheads Georgia EMC support of Georgia 4-H, has been one of the group’s most important supporters for decades. “This is an incredible honor for me, particularly when you look at the past recipients of this award, which includes governors, business people and legislative leaders,” Wood said. “I am fortunate to work for the EMCs of Georgia, which have always been strong advocates of 4-H in our state. Georgia undoubtedly has the premier 4-H program in the United States, and it has been my privilege to support it.” Georgia 4-H is a program of the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension and delivered to Georgia’s children through local UGA Extension offices across the state. For more about the Georgia 4-H program, visit Georgia4H.org.last_img read more

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Kudzu Bug Resistance

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first_imgKudzu bugs are not native to Georgia, but in the past seven years, they’ve made their homes in soybean fields across the southeastern U.S.While they don’t cause damage every soybean season, they can cause yield losses of between 20 and 60 percent. That can create a big loss for farmers who tend the approximately 80 million acres of soybeans grown in the U.S. each year. Fortunately a team of University of Georgia researchers may be on the verge of a solution.“I think we’re going to have to think of the kudzu bug as a cyclical pest, like the soybean aphid,” said Adam Bray, a recent doctoral graduate from the UGA Department of Crop and Soil Sciences. “Populations have died down, but we want to be ready if they do come back.”Working with UGA molecular plant breeder Wayne Parrott, Bray was able to identify varieties of soybean that are resistant to the damage caused by the invasive insect. Identifying resistant varieties of soybean is the first step to breeding new, resistant varieties.“This is a move toward developing crop varieties that require fewer insecticides and thus can be more sustainably and economically grown,” said Parrott, a professor of crop and soil sciences in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.Kudzu bugs, or Megacopta cribraria, have green and brown bodies, stippled wing covers and wide back ends, and they produce an odor that has been compared to odorized natural gas.They are sometimes confused with brown marmorated stinkbugs, but they are only distantly related. Kudzu bugs are in the family Plataspidae and stinkbugs are in the family Pentatomidae, but they are both in the same insect order, Hemiptera.Kudzu bugs were initially identified in northeast Georgia in 2009. They feed on Georgia’s most famous weed – kudzu – but they will eat any legume plant, including soybeans.Numbers seem to have dwindled across the state in recent years, but the insects are still present in soybean fields. Farmers dread another population boom like what they saw between 2010 and 2013.Bray saw the need for a kudzu bug-resistant soybean variety while he was a graduate student at UGA.He began working with about 30 Asian landrace varieties that colleagues in the Midwest identified as resistant to soybean aphids, which are a problem in Midwestern soybean fields. These varieties were used widely across Asia and were selected by generations of farmers for their resilience and productivity. Retired UGA soybean breeder Roger Boerma first thought that these lines of soybeans might also be resistant to kudzu bugs.Through field tests and by raising successive generations of soybeans in growth chambers filled with kudzu bugs, Bray identified six resistant varieties. Then, he selected the two most resistant varieties from among the six.Kudzu bugs normally lay their eggs in soybean fields, and the nymphs feed on the stems of soybean plants while they mature. These varieties made it impossible for the nymphs to survive to adulthood, Bray said.Now, the search is on to identify the genes that make these two varieties the most resistant, Bray said.“We want to identify those genes and cross them into the elite (high-yielding, resistant) varieties that we’re already growing here,” Bray said.Lead UGA soybean breeder Zenglu Li has taken on the task of mapping the two resistant varieties and identifying the gene or genes responsible for resistance. Not only will this allow breeders to develop kudzu-bug-resistant varieties of soybeans, but it will also reveal the mechanisms that lead plants to develop defenses to the pests around them.“Once the genetic basis of resistance is understood, it will help us to stay one step ahead of the insects,” Parrott said. “Right now, we react when they come. In the future, it would be nice to prevent them from becoming pests in first place.”For more information about the work being done in The Parrott Lab, visit parrottlab.uga.edu/parrottlab.last_img read more

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Jeffords will not seek reelection

By on January 1, 2021

first_imgJeffords’ Statement Announcing Decision Not to Seek Reelectionin 2006Statement of Senator Jim JeffordsApril 20, 2005For almost 40 years, the voters of Vermont have honored me with their support and their trust. I have tried my best to be worthy of that honor, whether serving in Montpelier or Washington, D.C.I have had an enormously satisfying career, one that I would not have traded for any other. In no other job do you have both the freedom and obligation to solve problems and help people on a daily basis.But it is time to begin a new chapter, both for me personally and for the people of Vermont. After much thought and consultation with my family and staff, I have decided to close this chapter of my service to Vermont, and not seek re-election in 2006.Between now and the end of my term, I will be working overtime to accomplish as much as I can for Vermont, in education, the environment,agriculture, health care and so many other areas.I still relish the challenges in Washington, but there are even better reasons to step down and return to Vermont. My wife Liz has put up with a lot over the years, and it is long past time I spent more time with her. Liz, as you know, is battling cancer, and will soon have to undergo another round of chemotherapy. If you know her you know that cancer has probably met its match.I look forward to seeing a lot more of my children and their families. And in a few weeks, I look forward to greeting our first grandchild into the family.There have been questions about my health, and that is a factor as well. I am feeling the aches and pains that come when you reach 70. My memory fails me on occasion, but Liz would probably argue this has been going on for the last 50 years.I am excited about coming home and working with the University of Vermont and other institutions to focus on what I think is the biggest challenge we face as a nation, the education of our children. If we were a nation at risk in 1983, two decades later that risk is even graver.We will never be able to maintain our standard of living against competitors around the world if we do not maintain the advantage of a highly skilled workforce. Unfortunately we are now importing thousands of skilled workers per year. This has to turn around.The people of Vermont will have a new U.S. Senator for the first time in almost a generation. I am making my announcement today because it seems only fair that Vermonters have ample time to consider that decision, and that the many able Vermont candidates, for this and other offices that may be open, have time to make their own plans.I have been blessed by a wonderful family, great friends, and a fine staff over my entire career. And I am forever grateful for the trust ofthe people of our state.Thanks, Vermont.last_img read more

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