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Call for end to unofficial ban on foreign journalists

By on June 12, 2021

first_img News March 6, 2009 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Call for end to unofficial ban on foreign journalists Related documents Letter to Belarus Foreign ministerPDF – 188.73 KB Receive email alerts June 2, 2021 Find out more “We welcome opening of criminal investigation in Lithuania in response to our complaint against Lukashenko” RSF says Help by sharing this information Organisation May 27, 2021 Find out more RSF at the Belarusian border: “The terrorist is the one who jails journalists and intimidates the public” Follow the news on Belarus Newscenter_img BelarusEurope – Central Asia RSF_en Reporters Without Borders today urged Belarus to end its systematic refusal to give permission to foreign journalists to work in the country, saying they were the target of “ridiculous bureaucratic and political behaviour.” A new media law that came into force on 8 February requires all foreign journalists to get accreditation from the foreign ministry before coming to Belarus, but requests have been systematically refused, “forcing journalists to work illegally,” the worldwide press freedom organisation said. It formally protested to foreign minister Sergei Martynov.Ivan Roman, of the privately-owned Polish-Dutch station Radio Racyja, was refused accreditation on 4 March on grounds that he had previously worked illegally in the country. The day before, officials refused to renew the accreditation of Andrei Pochobut, of the independent Polish daily Gazeta Wyborcza, because they said his recent articles about the country’s politics were unsatisfactory. Two Radio Racyja journalists were also refused accreditation for the same reason in January, even though the new law had not yet come into force. to go further Russian media boss drops the pretence and defends Belarus crackdown BelarusEurope – Central Asia News News An accreditation request made last December by the privately-owned TV station Belsat, which broadcasts in Belarusian from Poland, was refused on 2 March by the foreign ministry as “incomplete.” Radio Racyja and Belsat are two of the few sources of independent news in Belarus, which ranks 154th on the Reporters Without Borders annual world press freedom index. Read the RSF open letter to Foreign Minister Sergei Martynov : May 28, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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Slovak press law change would dangerously expand politicians’ “right of reply”

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first_img As things stand, politicians only have an automatic right of reply when “false or mendacious” claims have been published about them. But the bill now before the Slovak parliament would grant them this right whenever they felt that their honour or reputation had been harmed, regardless of the accuracy of the facts. News Reporters Without Borders (RSF) is a concerned about a proposed amendment to Slovakia’s media law that would make it easier for Slovak politicians to demand a right of reply in the media, even when the facts at issue were proven and verified. RSF fears that this could jeopardize the freedom to inform “But allowing politicians to systematically demand a right of reply whenever they feel slighted, even when the facts are proven and verified, opens the way to abuses. Because this right could be abused, we urge Slovakia’s parliamentarians to revise the bill so that it does not obstruct the freedom to inform at time when the media are revealing information about Ján Kuciak’s murder that could affect certain politicians.” Declaring “a war” on journalists, Fico announced the creation of a Smer-SD legal team tasked with monitoring the media. Forced to resign as prime minister after investigative reporter Ján Kuciak’s murder a year ago, Fico has long been in the habit of attacking the media and is notorious for referring to reporters as “filthy anti-Slovak prostitutes” and “idiotic hyenas.” March 29, 2019 Slovak press law change would dangerously expand politicians’ “right of reply” RSF and 60 other organisations call for an EU anti-SLAPP directive to go further SlovakiaEurope – Central Asia Protecting journalistsMedia independence Freedom of expressionJudicial harassment Receive email alerts Slovak premier visits RSF, encouraged to turn his country into “press freedom model for Europe” Under the proposed amendment that parliament is due to begin debating in May, media outlets that refuse to publish a politician’s response could be ordered to pay damages of up to 5,000 euros. Use the Digital Services Act to make democracy prevail over platform interests, RSF tells EU Help by sharing this information News News AFP RSF_en SlovakiaEurope – Central Asia Protecting journalistsMedia independence Freedom of expressionJudicial harassment After the shock caused by Kuciak’s murder, some moderation was expected from the political class in their treatment of the news media and journalists. But nothing has been done in the past year to improve the environment for the media and strengthen protection for press freedom in Slovakia, currently ranked 27th out of 180 countries in RSF’s World Press Freedom Index. News “When media outlets publish allegations about politicians, it is legitimate for the politicians to have a right of reply, in order to defend themselves,” said Pauline Adès-Mevel, the head of RSF’s European Union and Balkans desk. “You are an enormous danger to the Slovak Republic’s democratic development,” former Prime Minister Robert Fico, the Smer-SD party’s boss, told journalists on 21 March, going so far as to threaten to sue Beata Balogová, the editor of the serious daily SME. Follow the news on Slovakia February 4, 2021 Find out more December 2, 2020 Find out more June 2, 2021 Find out more The amendment has been proposed by the ruling Smer-SD party, which wants to provide politicians with an effective tool for defending themselves against what it calls “media terror.” Organisation last_img read more

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Mark & Stephen’s Marmalade

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first_img More Cool Stuff First Heatwave Expected Next Week 5 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Business News Community News When life gives you lemons, this dynamic duo at the Pasadena Farmer’s Market made marmalade. Stephen and Mark started out making marmalade for holiday gifts in 2000. One of their friends had twenty Mayer Lemon Trees and had no idea what to do with thousands of lemon they produced each year. Stephen and Mark came up with the recipe that received rave reviews from friends and families so they started selling their marmalade at the local Farmers’ Markets. Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Their products are available at the Victory Park Farmer’s Market takes place every Saturday from 8:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m. at the 2900 block of North Sierra Madre Boulevard. Call (626) 449-0179 or visit www.pasadenafarmersmarket.org for more information. Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Make a comment Soon enough they decided to develop other flavors and started buying fruit from the best farmers in California and picked the most flavorful vine ripened fruits available. Their business have grown quite a bit from the first days of squeezing Meyer Lemons and Blood Oranges, but they continue to make everything in their 2,000 square foot kitchen, which ensures the same excellent quality our customers have come to love in our products. Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Top of the News EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Herbeauty9 Of The Best Family Friendly Dog BreedsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHe Is Totally In Love With You If He Does These 7 ThingsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWant To Seriously Cut On Sugar? You Need To Know A Few TricksHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyIs It Bad To Give Your Boyfriend An Ultimatum?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThe Real Truth About The Pain Caused By MicrobladingHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Strong Female TV Characters Who Deserve To Have A SpinoffHerbeautyHerbeauty Community News Pasadena Eats, The Dining Blog Mark & Stephen’s Marmalade From STAFF REPORTS Published on Tuesday, March 22, 2016 | 12:14 pm They recently expanded their range of products of salad sauces and chutneys. Check out their delicious recipes including Red Quinoa with dried fruit and pecans with their signature blood orange raspberry vinaigrette. Simply mix together red onion, cilantro, feta cheese, pomegranate seeds and diced apple. Add cooked quinoa, toss gently and add the salad dressing. You can enjoy it either the same or the next day! Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Subscribe Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

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Caltech Mourns Harold Rosen, the “Father of Geostationary Satellite Communications,” 1926-2017

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first_img Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy More Cool Stuff Community News Top of the News Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * First Heatwave Expected Next Week Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday 19 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimescenter_img HerbeautyTiger Woods’ Ex Wife Found A New Love PartnerHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty15 Countries Where Men Have Difficulties Finding A WifeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyNutritional Strategies To Ease AnxietyHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty5 Things To Avoid If You Want To Have Whiter TeethHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyYou Can’t Go Past Our Healthy Quick RecipesHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Fashion Trends You Should Never Try And 6 You’ll LoveHerbeautyHerbeauty Business News Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Make a comment People Caltech Mourns Harold Rosen, the “Father of Geostationary Satellite Communications,” 1926-2017 By ROBERT PERKINS Published on Tuesday, January 31, 2017 | 5:08 pm Harold Rosen Credit: BoeingHarold Rosen (MS ’48, PhD ’51), the father of geostationary satellite communications, passed away on January 30, 2017. He was 90.Modern communications technology relies on a fleet of hundreds of satellites orbiting in fixed locations above the earth’s surface. These geostationary satellites, as they are known, act as communications relays, allowing for near-instantaneous signal transmission across the globe without the need for wired networks. And without Harold Rosen, they would not exist.Harold Rosen was born on March 20, 1926, in New Orleans and graduated from high school at age 15. He showed an early fascination with science and engineering and, as a teen, was an amateur radio operator. Near the close of World War II, the 18-year-old Rosen—by then a senior at Tulane University studying electrical engineering—joined the Navy as an electronics technician. He completed his undergraduate studies when the war ended and in 1947 began graduate research at Caltech under rocket telemetering pioneer Bill Pickering (BS ’32, MS ’33, PhD ’36).During his graduate years, Rosen took a part-time job at Raytheon Company, where he was tasked with improving antiaircraft guided missiles and radar; he continued full time at the company after receiving his doctorate in 1951. His Caltech education, he told a Caltech publication in 2012, “gave me such a good grounding in the fundamentals” that he felt capable of attacking any technical problem in almost any field.“Harold Rosen was an illustrious alumnus who was ahead of his time in promoting interdisciplinary thinking,” says Guruswami Ravichandran, the John E. Goode, Jr., Professor of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering and Otis Booth Leadership Chair of the Division of Engineering and Applied Science at Caltech. “The impact of the interdisciplinary fundamental education he received at Caltech is illustrated by his transformational thinking in the field of satellite communications.”Spurred on by the launch of the Sputnik satellite in 1957, Rosen set out to one-up the Soviets. While Sputnik was only capable of transmitting beeps back to the earth, Rosen—who had been hired a year earlier by Hughes Aircraft Company—envisioned placing a full communications relay in space.At the time, long-distance telephone calls were both expensive and difficult, since any call needed to be routed over the limited number of telephone lines that stretched between various locations.The idea that geostationary satellites could overcome these limitations dates back to the late 1920s and was popularized by science fiction author Arthur C. Clarke in a paper written in 1945. But the proposal faced significant challenges. Engineers at the time worried that such a satellite would either be too heavy to launch or would not survive long enough in orbit to be commercially worth the expense.Collaborating with engineers Thomas Hudspeth and Don Williams, Rosen designed a lightweight cylindrical solar-powered satellite that spun like a gyroscope and used small pulses of thrust to remain stable in orbit.His design convinced the initially reluctant management at Hughes to greenlight the development of a 55-pound prototype. With that prototype in hand, he was able to enlist the support of Caltech alumnus John Rubel (BS ’42), then deputy research director at the U.S. Department of Defense. At the time, Rubel was overseeing an attempt by the Pentagon to build its own communications satellite—but the design had a projected weight of thousands of pounds. Rubel convinced NASA to instead fund Rosen’s Syncom (“synchronous communication satellite”) program.The first Syncom satellite was launched in February 1963 but failed because of a problem with one of its motors. A second attempt in July 1963—with a redesigned motor—was successful, and the satellite soon became operational. In August, President John F. Kennedy used Syncom 2 to telephone the Nigerian prime minister in what was the first live two-way call via satellite between heads of governments. In 1964, Syncom 3 was launched, allowing the transmission of live television signals from Tokyo during the Summer Olympics.“There have been many great engineers but few with Harold’s imagination and even fewer who could fulfill their dreams,” says his brother, Benjamin (Ben) Rosen (BS ’54), chairman emeritus of the Caltech Board of Trustees.Rosen eventually directed the development of more than 150 communications satellites—first with Hughes, then with Boeing after it acquired Hughes—before retiring in 1993. Even in retirement, Rosen continued to consult for Boeing and gave periodic lectures to engineering students at Caltech. Along with his venture capitalist brother Ben, whose fund financed Compaq Computer Corp. and who was its first chairman and CEO, Harold started Rosen Motors, which developed a hybrid-electric automotive powertrain with a microturbine engine and a magnetically suspended very-high-speed flywheel.Later, Rosen and his wife, Deborah Castleman (MS ’86), collaborated with JB Straubel of Rosen Motors in a venture called Volacom that specialized in the design of high-altitude, hybrid-propulsion aircraft with the dream of someday providing wireless Internet access to cities via a fleet of circling drones. Castleman managed the business end of the operation while Rosen and Straubel patented a new long-endurance hybrid-propulsion system that they later licensed to Boeing.“It was an innovative and audacious plan,” Castleman remembers. “We even invested some of our own funds to work closely with Burt Rutan and his team at Scaled Composites to design this specialized high-altitude aircraft platform that used a novel hydrogen-powered electric power plant.” Ultimately, however, Volacom was unable to obtain venture funding and shuttered—after which Straubel became a co-founder and chief technology officer at Tesla Motors.In recognition of his groundbreaking work, Rosen received the National Medal of Technology in 1985, was inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame in 2003, and was the recipient of the Robert H. Goddard Memorial Trophy from The National Space Club in 2015, the Philip J. Klass Lifetime Achievement Award from Aviation Week & Space Technology magazine in 2014, the Communications and Computing Prize from NEC in 1985, and the first L. M. Ericsson International Prize in Communications in 1976, among other honors. He was a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers and the recipient of its Alexander Graham Bell Medal in 1982; a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics; and a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and recipient of its Charles Stark Draper Prize in 1995. He was named a Distinguished Alumnus of Caltech in 1976.Rosen is survived by his wife Deborah; sons Robert and Rocky Rosen; grandchildren Josh, Hillary, and Stephanie Rosen; and his brother Ben. Subscribe Community News EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDSlast_img read more

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Wells Fargo’s Chief Risk Officer Mike Loughlin to Retire

By on May 31, 2021

first_imgHome / Featured / Wells Fargo’s Chief Risk Officer Mike Loughlin to Retire Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily January 20, 2018 1,792 Views Subscribe Related Articles About Author: Nicole Casperson  Print This Post Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Previous: Transformational Mortgage Solutions Announces New President & COO Next: Ellie Mae Passes New Milestone Wells Fargo’s Chief Risk Officer Mike Loughlin to Retire Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Nicole Casperson is the Associate Editor of DS News and MReport. She graduated from Texas Tech University where she received her M.A. in Mass Communications and her B.A. in Journalism. Casperson previously worked as a graduate teaching instructor at Texas Tech’s College of Media and Communications. Her thesis will be published by the International Communication Association this fall. To contact Casperson, e-mail: [email protected] The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days agocenter_img Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Wells Fargo & Company announced that Senior EVP Mike Loughlin will retire as the company’s Chief Risk Officer. The company expects to name a successor in the next few months and Loughlin will remain in his current role through the transition.“Mike’s 36 years of service to Wells Fargo have included some of the most critical times in our company’s history,” said Timothy J. Sloan, President and CEO of Wells Fargo. “From the financial crisis in 2008, to the company’s merger with Wachovia, to the many economic and credit cycles we have navigated, Mike has demonstrated leadership and a commitment to all our stakeholders, especially our customers, in one of our company’s most critical roles, and for that we are grateful.”A direct report of Sloan’s serving on the company’s Operating Committee, Loughlin has been Wells Fargo’s Chief Risk Officer since 2008, overseeing key risk-oriented activities at the company, including credit, market risk, operational risk, compliance, and information security (including cyber risk). Over the past two years, Loughlin also has led efforts to centralize many of the company’s risk functions to provide more comprehensive oversight of the company’s risks.“It has been a great privilege to serve an American institution as important and as valued as Wells Fargo,” Loughlin said. “I am preparing for retirement with enthusiasm for Wells Fargo’s future, confidence in the work its leaders will continue, and gratitude for the many customers and colleagues I have had the great pleasure to know.”Loughlin joined Wells Fargo in 1986, following the company’s acquisition of Crocker Bank. Prior to becoming Chief Risk Officer, Loughlin was responsible for credit approval, policy, and reporting for Wholesale Banking and has held senior roles in Wealth Management, Corporate Banking, Operations and Middle Market Banking. Today, he also serves on the board of directors of Students Rising Above, an organization dedicated to helping low-income, first-generation college students realize their potential by guiding and supporting them through college graduation and into the workforce. Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Is Rise in Forbearance Volume Cause for Concern? 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Share Save in Featured, News Tagged with: HOUSING mortgage Wells Fargo HOUSING mortgage Wells Fargo 2018-01-20 Nicole Caspersonlast_img read more

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Democratising The Cyber Laws

By on May 26, 2021

first_imgColumnsDemocratising The Cyber Laws Gauri Thampi. P2 Dec 2020 11:15 PMShare This – xAccording to Professor Ronald Dworkin, freedom for hate speech or group defamation is the price we pay for enforcing the laws that the haters and defamers oppose. His argument which appeared as a foreword in the book ‘Extreme Speech and Democracy’ came to be referred to as the ‘Legitimacy theory’. It focuses on the significance of free and unrestricted speech in ensuring the…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginAccording to Professor Ronald Dworkin, freedom for hate speech or group defamation is the price we pay for enforcing the laws that the haters and defamers oppose. His argument which appeared as a foreword in the book ‘Extreme Speech and Democracy’ came to be referred to as the ‘Legitimacy theory’. It focuses on the significance of free and unrestricted speech in ensuring the legitimacy of democracy. The expression of opposition must be allowed no matter how foul or vicious the expression is, as otherwise no legitimacy will attach to the laws enacted over their opposition. Therefore, the legitimacy theory does not support a legislation curbing speech or hate speech for that matter. As ruthless and impracticable as this sounds, the underlying argument which denotes the implication of free speech in the democracy is commendable. Contrary to this position, how can legitimacy of a democracy be upheld in a scenario where hate mongering speech is targeting the minorities or the vulnerable? The legitimacy theory still argues that the harm envisaged by restricting hate speech is more than the harm resulting from the hate speech. While enacting a legislation against online hate speech it is this balance of harm that must be kept as the scale. In Shreya Singhal v. Union of India while striking down Section 66A of the IT Act, the apex court held that “where no reasonable standards are laid down to define guilt in a Section which creates an offense, and where no clear guidance is given to either law abiding citizens or to authorities and courts, a section which creates an offense and which is vague must be struck down as being arbitrary and unreasonable.” The recent attempt to amend the Kerala Police Act by inserting ‘section 118A’ , though withdrawn quickly owing to backlash from public domain, was also filled with the very same but revamped vagueness and arbitrariness of section 66A. These are instances where a legislation restricting free speech went appallingly wrong. As much as free speech must be encouraged and allowed to occupy spaces unhampered by government interference, violence in the online space is increasing now more than ever. We are at the age where social media can be equipped to influence elections, host terrorists and carry out full-fledged wars. This pressure urges the government and law enforcement agencies to push for the formulation of new laws to cater to the dynamic cybercrimes. It is true to state that repealing of section 66A has created a large gap leaving a section of offences in the cyber space unaddressed. This has left several victims claimless against their abusers. However, even in this period a plethora of unwarranted charges have still been framed against innocents to satisfy political vendetta using the existing sections in the IPC and IT Act. Journalist Prashant Kanojia was arrested over his allegedly ‘objectionable tweet’ invoking nine sections of the IPC along with section 66 of IT Act, and jailed for a period of 2 months without bail. On the other hand, the police did not act on the complaint of artist Bhagyalakshmi and two other women against a sexist/misogynist/hate mongering cyber bully. When a complaint was finally registered it was under minor bailable provisions of the IPC which triggered the aggrieved women to retaliate against the accused in their own terms. Incongruously, the women were later denied bail by the lower court for taking law into their own hands. It seems ironical that the lacunae in laws are only operating against the victims or persons whom a hate speech legislation proposes to protect. But to serve the state’s political interests by framing fabricated charges the existing laws are more than sufficient. As both the above instances create victims, it shows us the overlapping rights and wrongs of the legitimacy theory. Therefore, while legislating a cyber law to curb hate speech the framework must clearly stipulate the speech it does not seek to curb before laying down its objectives of restricting free speech. Specifying the limits, objectives and boundaries of the legislation, clearly defining the offences, its ingredients, and applicability are points to be considered before coming up with cyber laws restricting speech. Another vaguely worded provision complementing the existing diaspora of widely misused laws will be a threat to the constitutional ethos. It is also pertinent to understand and address the fundamental issues of the cyberspace which creates a hostile environment. For example, it is the anonymity on internet which often triggers herd mentality and wakes the inherent character deficiencies in human beings. In an article published in 2016, Prof. Walter Isaacson had proposed a future model of internet which can create a ‘voluntary’ system of verified identification and authentication which is capable of addressing these issues of anonymity. It is undebatable that cyber space has already become our present and future, and any solution that seeks to wholly address the issues on cyber space must start from its roots. Therefore, a holistic approach must be adopted for creating safe spaces online with the cooperation of different stakeholders. Creating a constitutionally sound legislation upholding the international standards of human rights is one of its important aspects. Such an approach will not only facilitate the free flow of communication, but also strengthen the legitimacy of democracy by encouraging the non-interference of government in free speech and expression.Views are personal.(Author is a practicing Lawyer at the Kerala High Court)Next Storylast_img read more

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It’s Wise For the Broncos To Draft a QB at #5

By on May 8, 2021

first_img Brad James  I see this as a well-put and wise take from Mason. Andrew [email protected] FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmail*This is another one of my articles from Predominantly Orange. I’m doing collaboration and giving today’s star Andrew Mason some recognition on two platforms. He’s a great journalist.After thinking about things, I believe it’s wise for the Denver Broncos to draft a quarterback with the #5 overall selection in the NFL Draft.With last week’s acquisition of offensive tackle Jared Velheer from Arizona, this gives the Broncos a solid option-if healthy.Quenton Nelson of Notre Dame’s a popular pick on many mock drafts, but this aforementioned acquisition ensures the Broncos don’t have to address the offensive line with an early draft pick.I do appreciate Andrew Mason of Orange and Blue 760 AM in Denver’s thoughts here on the matter. Replying to @UKDenverBroncosNot nearly as many top-shelf QB prospects next year, unless something radically changes. It’s Missouri’s Drew Lock and a lot of question marks. This is the best QB year in quite a while, and it would be wise to take advantage of it.4:39 PM – Mar 22, 2018 March 26, 2018 /Sports News – Local, Sports News – National It’s Wise For the Broncos To Draft a QB at #5 22 MarAndrew [email protected] Written by Tags: Andrew Mason/De’Angelo Henderson/Demaryius Thomas/Denver Broncos/Emmanuel Sanders/Jared Veldheer/Predominantly Orange In fact, despite having Robert Griffin III (who had not busted yet) in 2012, the Washington Redskins drafted Kirk Cousins.The future saw the wisdom of that unfold, at least making Cousins fabulously wealthy at Minnesota.In any event, we know incumbent Broncos starter, Case Keenum, can do well when called upon.Nevertheless, with the Broncos giving him only a two-year deal, the stage may still be set for a young quarterback.Of all the prospects the Broncos could draft at quarterback, I like Baker Mayfield the most.I think he has sufficient athleticism to make plays when freelancing.Additionally, I think, as his Wonderlic score attests, he has the brains to master an NFL playbook.While he has committed transgressions, I believe he has “repented” and is willing to focus on his tasks at hand.If you have the opportunity to have two stud signal-callers in your stable (think the 2017 Eagles), why not go for it?That is, after all, the best way to win in the NFL in which we now live: “a quarterback’s league.”If Veldheer can do what the Broncos think he can, the offensive line should be better than 2017.If this happens, the Broncos’ offense can take a quantum leap from a paltry 2017.The skill positions are still full of studs, with wide receivers Demaryius Thomas and Emmanuel Sanders, among others.Running back De’Angelo Henderson may finally get the opportunity he needs to excel and tight end Jake Butt may finally stay healthy.If these things materialize as the Broncos hope, a return to the playoffs could be a thing, but draft wisely!last_img read more

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New Zealand Turns Down UN Request for Piracy Warship

By on May 4, 2021

first_img View post tag: turns New Zealand has turned down a United Nations request to provide a warship for piracy patrols, probably off the coast of Africa…(stuff)[mappress]Source: stuff,March 17, 2011; View post tag: Warship New Zealand Turns Down UN Request for Piracy Warship View post tag: request March 17, 2011 View post tag: New View post tag: Naval View post tag: Navycenter_img Back to overview,Home naval-today New Zealand Turns Down UN Request for Piracy Warship View post tag: News by topic View post tag: down View post tag: UN View post tag: piracy View post tag: Zealand Share this articlelast_img read more

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Canadian CG ship fined for violating mandatory slow down

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first_img View post tag: Canadian Coast Guard Back to overview,Home naval-today Canadian Coast Guard ship fined for violating mandatory slow down Canadian Coast Guard ship fined for violating mandatory slow down Authorities The Canadian transport authority has issued a $6,000 penalty to the Canadian Coast Guard Ship Sir William Alexander after the vessel failed to respect the temporary mandatory slow down in place for all vessels in the Gulf of St. Lawrence.The Coast Guard will have 30 days to pay the penalty or ask the Transportation Appeal Tribunal of Canada to review the facts of the violation or the amount of the penalty.Transport Canada on August 11, 2017, started implementing a temporary mandatory slow down of vessels 20 meters or more to a maximum of 10 knots in the western Gulf of St. Lawrence, between the Quebec north shore and just north of Prince Edward Island.According to the agency, the action was undertaken to help ensure navigational safety and to protect the marine environment, due to the increased presence of whales in the area.This is the second penalty issued in relation to Gulf of St. Lawrence speed restrictions. In an unrelated case in 2016, the Canadian Navy was ordered to pay a penalty of CAD$100,000 after frigate HMCS St. John’s spilled approximately 9000 liters of diesel into Halifax Harbour while at anchor.center_img View post tag: CCGS Sir William Alexander September 19, 2017 Share this articlelast_img read more

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OCTOBER 31, 2016 “READERS FORUM”

By on May 3, 2021

first_imgWHATS ON YOUR MIND TODAY?Todays “READERS POLL” question is: Do you feel when Ben Shoulders discovered that his fellow co-worker was the moderator of a political event should he asked her to recuse herself from this panel?Please take time and read our newest feature articles entitled “IU WOMEN’S-MENS SWIM AND DIVING TEAMS”.Also take time to read “BIRTHDAYS, HOT JOBS” and “LOCAL SPORTS” posted in our sections.If you would like to advertise in the CCO please contact us City-County [email protected] County Observer has been serving our community for 15 years.Copyright 2015 City County Observer. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistribute.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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