redevgml

Growing Giving the Pennies Way with Robson Green

By on June 16, 2021

first_img Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 5 December 2012 | News Tagged with: Celebrity Individual giving Pennies Foundation  45 total views,  1 views today Actor Robson Green explains how microdonations service Pennies works.The video was presented for the first time at Pennies’ second anniversary event at BAFTA in London on 26 November 2012.  46 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Growing Giving the Pennies Way with Robson Greenlast_img read more

Continue Reading

redevgml

MLK Day marked by protests vs police brutality and gentrification

By on June 15, 2021

first_imgSeveral events celebrating the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. took place throughout Southwest Virginia Jan. 16-18. This area of Appalachia has a long history of people’s resistance against Wall Street barons and bankers, most notably from the United Mine Workers union, but also from many other labor and community organizations. Some highlights of solidarity with Dr. King’s ideas and tactics were practiced during the 1989-1990 UMW strike against the Pittston Coal Co.In Abingdon, Va., on Jan. 16, a diverse array of labor, community and student organizations participated in the 30th annual King holiday parade and march sponsored by the Appalachian Peace Education Center. Speakers made connections between King’s historic resistance to poverty, racism and war, and today’s Black Lives Matter movement and the fight for living wages.On Jan. 18 in Roanoke, Va., the King Day parade and program was sponsored by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and endorsed by the NAACP Youth Council and other organizations. Many community members participated to demand an end to racism, union-busting and police brutality. Other 2016 MLK holiday events in Southwest Virginia took place in Bristol, Wise, Wytheville and other locations.Denver. WW photo: Vivian WeinsteinA huge Black Lives Matter contingent behind the banner “Death by Cop Is Lynching” led the Martin Luther King Jr. march in Denver. Attended by over 20,000, the multicultural and multiracial event included people from churches, Jewish groups, peace groups and schools. They carried signs about the recent multiple police killings of youth of color, including Jessica Hernandez and Michael Marshall, by the Denver police.Oakland, Calif. WW photo: Terri KayLocal supporters joined the Interfaith Committee in Solidarity with Black Lives Matter — Bay Area for a vigil and candlelight funeral procession on Jan. 15 in Oakland, Calif.’s Oscar Grant Plaza as part of the Anti Police-Terror Project’s “96 Hours of Direct Action to Reclaim King’s Radical Legacy.”Organizers called on Oakland city officials and residents alike to see, connect with, and mourn the Black and Brown lives lost to police violence as well as the losses born by communities of color in Oakland as a result of over-policing, displacement and gentrification.Protesters called out the Oakland mayor, Libby Schaaf, for inaction on racist police killings. Called by “Showing Up for Racial Justice” as part of the 96 hours of direct action, over 50 people marched on Schaaf’s home with signs in the shape of coffins and real estate “sold” signs. SURJ stated that “since Mayor Schaaf took office in January 2015, at least seven Black people have been murdered at the hands of Oakland police. Schaaf and other civic officials have also encouraged massive increases in commercial development that is resulting in the traumatic displacement of Black, Brown and working-class folks across Oakland.” The coffin and real estate signs, mounted on stakes, were pounded into Schaaf’s lawn.The 96 hours of direct action continued on the evening of Jan. 16, when over 100 protesters gathered inside the Oakland airport terminals in the evening to read aloud the names of dozens of Black and Brown people killed by Bay Area police in the past few years. They marched between terminals carrying a banner which read “Welcome to Oakland.”As passengers exited the gate areas, they were greeted with a “mic check” statement, led by the APTP’s Cat Brooks, welcoming them to Oakland, but not the pretty one in the travel brochures: “Under the mayorship of Libby Schaaf, a mandate has been issued to make the city pretty for tourists and developers. This has meant an upsurge in police terror and murders in Oakland. In what we have dubbed ‘Libby’s Bloody Era,’ a string of Black men were murdered in Oakland in 2015. All of them declared ‘justifiable.’” The airport action was so successful, it was repeated the next night at the San Francisco International Airport.Buffalo, N.Y. WW photo: Ellie DorritieOn Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday, Jan. 15, a protest was called in ­Buffalo, N.Y., to address racist hiring practices, low wages and the lack of job opportunities at recent development projects in the city. The speakout targeted the Roswell Park Health Center along with other publicly funded projects. Many of these projects are part of the gentrification process in Buffalo that has pushed people from oppressed communities out of their homes and jobs to make way for luxury apartments and other projects.The protest and march were called by Charley H. Fisher III, president of B.U.I.L.D. Inc., Erie County legislator Betty Jean Grant and Alberto O. Cappas, president of the Puerto Rican and African American Association, as well as the Buffalo Committee for a Racial Discrimination Free Healthcare System. Protesters vowed to return again and again until victory is won.Between 5,000 to 10,000 demonstrators marched in the 34th annual Martin Luther King Day Celebration March in Seattle. Following an opening rally that included many speakers and cultural performers, marchers went from Garfield High School in the Black community to the downtown federal building for an ending rally. The march was preceded by 22 social justice and community organizing workshops.Another contingent of 400 activists organized by Black Lives Matter in Seattle marched from Garfield High School to a site of neighborhood gentrification. They targeted a large, white-owned marijuana store called Ike’s, which has a dominating presence in the Black community. While marijuana sales are legal in the state, Ike’s big operation has eliminated community participation in the enterprise. Later in the day, an Information and Opportunity Fair was held at Garfield and a chicken dinner was provided for all the marchers.Vivian Weinstein, Terri Kay, WW Buffalo Bureau, Ellie Dorritie and Jim McMahan contributed to this article, which Betsey Piette edited.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

Continue Reading

redevgml

Muzaffarpur Shelter Home: Delhi HC Issues Notice In Brajesh Thakur’s Appeal Against His Conviction For Gangrape

By on May 26, 2021

first_imgNews UpdatesMuzaffarpur Shelter Home: Delhi HC Issues Notice In Brajesh Thakur’s Appeal Against His Conviction For Gangrape Karan Tripathi22 July 2020 12:28 AMShare This – xDelhi High Court has issued notice in criminal appeal moved by Brajesh Thakur against his conviction for gangrape in Muzaffarpur Shelter Home case. The Division Bench of Justice Vipin Sanghi and Justice Rajneesh Bhatnagar has issued notice to the Central Bureau of Investigation. On January 20, Additional Sessions Judge Saurabh Kulshreshtha had convicted Brajesh Thakur…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginDelhi High Court has issued notice in criminal appeal moved by Brajesh Thakur against his conviction for gangrape in Muzaffarpur Shelter Home case. The Division Bench of Justice Vipin Sanghi and Justice Rajneesh Bhatnagar has issued notice to the Central Bureau of Investigation. On January 20, Additional Sessions Judge Saurabh Kulshreshtha had convicted Brajesh Thakur for multiple grounds of rape, gangrape (section 376(d), IPC) aggravated sexual assault under section 6 of POCSO Act, criminal conspiracy, and offences under the Juvenile Justice Act. The court had also sentenced Thakur to life imprisonment till the remainder of his life for sexual and physical assault of minor girls at Muzaffarpur Shelter Home in Bihar. The court had also awarded life imprisonment to other 10 convicts, including 3 women. Among these 10 convicts, some were sentenced to imprisonment till the remainder of their lives. Several girls were raped and sexually abused at an NGO-run shelter home in Muzaffarpur, Bihar. The issue had come to light following a report by the Tata Institute of Social Sciences (TISS). Subscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img read more

Continue Reading

redevgml

Explainer: Inter-State Arrest, Transit Remand & Right To Legal Representation

By on

first_imgKnow the LawExplainer: Inter-State Arrest, Transit Remand & Right To Legal Representation Radhika Roy21 Feb 2021 4:28 AMShare This – x The concepts of ‘transit remand’ and ‘norms for inter-state arrests’ are being widely discussed in the wake of the arrest of 21-year old climate activist Disha Ravi by the Delhi Police from her Bengaluru resident in the ‘toolkit’ case.Many legal experts have questioned the Ravi’s custody saying that it was not accompanied with a ‘transit remand order’ from Bengaluru and norms for…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?Login The concepts of ‘transit remand’ and ‘norms for inter-state arrests’ are being widely discussed in the wake of the arrest of 21-year old climate activist Disha Ravi by the Delhi Police from her Bengaluru resident in the ‘toolkit’ case.Many legal experts have questioned the Ravi’s custody saying that it was not accompanied with a ‘transit remand order’ from Bengaluru and norms for inter-state arrest were violated. The Delhi Commission for Women has taken suo moto cognizance of the issue in the wake of widespread criticism against Ravi’s arrest and remand.In this backdrop, this piece is an attempt to explain the concepts of ‘transit bail’ and the ‘guidelines for inter-state arrest’.What is a Transit Remand Order?In practical terms, ‘transit remand order’ means on order passed by a Judicial Magistrate remanding an arrested person to police custody for the purpose of his transit to another state. By issuing such a ‘transit remand order’, the local Magistrate certifies that the police personnel from the outside state had the authority to arrest the person, and that such arrest was done legally. Further, the local Magistrate authorizes the other-state police to take the arrestee out of his home state.’Transit remand order’ acts as a valuable layer of protection in cases where a person is taken out of his familiar circumstances to an alien place. While the term “transit remand order” is not categorically defined in Indian criminal law, it finds its roots in Section 167 of the Code of Criminal Procedure. Section 167 lays down the procedure when the investigation cannot be completed in 24 hours as fixed by Section 57 and requires the police officer to transmit to the nearest Jurisdictional Magistrate a copy of the entries in the diary relating to the case, The Magistrate in turn may authorise detention of the accused for a term not exceeding 15 days, and if he has no jurisdiction, then he may order the accused to be forwarded to a Magistrate having such jurisdiction.From the aforementioned provisions, it is evident that in order to retain an accused in custody for a period exceeding 24 hours, the order of the Jurisdictional Magistrate is required and, for that, the police officer needs to produce the accused as well as copies of the case diary. A good reference point to understand the importance of these requirements is the 2018 Delhi High Court decision in the case Gautam Navlakha vs Union of India, in which a bench comprising Justices Dr S Muralidhar and Vinod Goel quashed the transit remand order on the ground that the Magistrate did not follow the requirements of Section 167.. In 2019, a Division Bench of the Delhi High Court had reiterated the detailed suggestions of a Committee constituted by it and had stated that in cases of inter-state arrest, an “endeavour should be made to obtain transit remand after producing the arrestee before the nearest Magistrate unless exigencies of the situation warrant otherwise and the person can be produced before the Magistrate having jurisdiction of the case without infringing the mandate of Sections 56 and 57 of CrPC within 24 hours”(Sandeep Kumar v State, Justices Dr S Muralidhar and Talwant Singh). In a 2009 judgement, the Delhi High Court had astonishingly observed that the Gujarat Police had come all the way from Ahmedabad to Delhi, beyond their jurisdiction, did not seek any assistance from the local police and had whisked away the accused to Gujarat – “Such practice is obviously contrary to the police manuals and if such actions go unchecked, it will amount to condoning lawlessness by the police force. In a country governed by the rule of law, this is simply unacceptable”. Further, the Court had noted that by snatching away the accused from his parental home and home environment, there had been a blatant infringement of his rights and would render a mental scar which had the potential to never heal.The High Court observed that the Gujarat police was bound to produce the accused before the nearest Magistrate who was in Delhi.”Article 22 (2) of the Constitution prescribes that every person who is arrested and detained in custody shall be produced before the nearest magistrate within a period of twenty four hours of such arrest excluding the time necessary for the journey from the place of arrest to the court of the magistrate and no such person shall be detained in custody beyond the said period without the authority of the magistrate. Once, we have determined that the factum of picking up Shamim from Delhi amounted to his ‗arrest’ and detention in custody, albeit illegal, it became incumbent upon the officials of the Gujarat police to produce him before the nearest Magistrate within a period of 24 hours. The nearest Magistrate was located in Delhi, but, obviously, he was not produced before any such Magistrate in Delhi”, the HC observed in that case while ordering compensation for illegal arrest.In the 1964 case of RK Nabachandra Singh v. Manipur Administration, it had been observed by the Gauhati High Court that the police should produce the arrested person before the Magistrate if investigation cannot be completed within 24 hours.”Unless a police officer considers that he can complete the investigation within a period of 24 hours, it is his duty to produce the accused forthwith before a magistrate and he should not wait for 24 hours”, the High Court observed.The concept of ‘transit remand’, though  not expressly mentioned in the CrPC, flows from Section 167 of the CrPC and Article 22 of the Constitution of India, as per which a person cannot be detained by the police for over 24 hours without the authorization of a judicial magistrate. With the aim of ensuring protection of the personal liberty of an individual, the Courts have evolved the concept of ‘transit remand’ in cases where the person is sought to be taken out of state by police from a different states. In such cases, the person ought to be produced before the nearest Magistrate soon after the arrest, and ought to be taken out of the arrestee’s home state only on the strength of a ‘transit remand order’ issued by such Magistrate.Application of Judicial Mind In the 2012 case of Manubhai Ratilal Patel v. State of Gujarat, the Supreme Court had held that the act of directing remand of an accused was fundamentally a judicial function and while exercising this function, it was obligatory on the part of the Magistrate to “satisfy himself whether the materials placed before him justify such a remand”. Therefore, there lies a responsibility on the Magistrate to apply his mind and not pass an order of remand automatically or in a mechanical manner.  Guidelines for Inter-State Arrest In the aforementioned 2019 case(Sandeep Kumar v State), a division bench of Justices Dr S Muralidhar and Talwant Singh of the Delhi High Court had also directed for the implementation of guidelines that had been proposed by the Committee and pertained to protocol that must be followed by the police in the event of inter-state investigation or arrest. Relying on Sections 48, 77, 79 and 80 of the CrPC, the guidelines stated the following guidelines for inter-state arrest:1. The Police Officer after assignment of the case to him, must seek prior permission/sanction of the higher/superior officers in writing or on phone (in case of urgency) to go out of State/UT to carry out investigation. 2. In a case when the police officer decides to effect an arrest, he must set out the facts and record reasons in writing disclosing the satisfaction that arrest is necessary for the purpose of investigation. At first instance, he should move the Jurisdictional Magistrate to seek arrest/search warrants under Section 78 and 79 Cr PC except in emergent cases when the time taken is likely to result in escape of the accused or disappearance of incriminating evidence or the procurement of arrest/search warrant would defeat the purpose. The Police Officer must record reasons as to what were the compelling reasons to visit other State without getting arrest/search warrants. 3. Before proceeding outside the State, the police officer must make a comprehensive departure entry in the Daily Diary of his Police Station. It should contain names of the police officials and private individuals accompanying him; vehicle number; purpose of visit; specific place(s) to be visited; time and date of departure. 4. If the possible arrestee is a female, a lady police officer be made part of the team. The Police Officers should take their identity cards with them. All police officers in the team should be in uniform; bear accurate, visible and clear identification and name tags with their designations. 5. Before visiting the other State, the Police Officer must endeavour to establish contact with the local Police Station in whose jurisdiction he is to conduct the investigation. He must carry with him the translated copies of the Complaint/FIR and other documents in the language of the State which he intends to visit. 6. After reaching the destination, first of all, he should inform the concerned police station of the purpose of his visit to seek assistance and co-operation. The concerned SHO should provide/render all legal assistance to him. Entry to this effect must be made at the said police station. 7. After reaching the spot of investigation, search, if any should be strictly conducted in compliance of the procedure laid down u/s 100 Cr PC. All endeavour should be made to join independent public witnesses from the neighbourhood. In case of arrest, the police officer must follow the procedure u/s 41A and 41B and Section 50 and 51 Cr PC. The process of arrest carried out by the police must be in compliance with the guidelines given in DK Basu case (Supra) and the provisions of CrPC. 8. The arrested person must be given an opportunity to consult his lawyer before he is taken out of State. 9. While returning, the police officer must visit the local police station and cause an entry made in the Daily Diary specifying the name and address of the person(s) being taken out of the State; articles if any, recovered. The victim’s name be also indicated. 10. Endeavor should be made to obtain transit remand after producing the arrestee before the nearest Magistrate unless exigencies of the situation warrant otherwise and the person can be produced before the Magistrate having jurisdiction of the case without infringing the mandate of S. 56 and 57 of Cr.P.C. within 24 hours. 11. The magistrate before whom the arrestee is produced, must apply his mind to the facts of the case and should not grant transit remand mechanically. He must satisfy himself that there exists material in the form of entries in the case diary that justifies the prayer for transit remand. The act of directing remand of an accused is fundamentally a judicial decision. The magistrate does not act in executive capacity while ordering detention of the accused. He must ensure that requirements of S. 41 (l)(b) are satisfied. The police officer must send the case diary along with the remand report so that the magistrate can appreciate the factual scenario and apply his mind whether there is a warrant for police remand or justification for judicial remand or there is no need for any remand at all. The magistrate should briefly set out reasons for his decision. (Manubhai Ratilal Patel v. State of Gujarat, (2013) 1 SCC 314) 12. Another mandatory procedural requirement for the Magistrate considering a transit remand application is spelt out in Article 22 (1) of Constitution of India. This entitles the person arrested to be informed as soon as may be the grounds of such arrest. The Magistrate has to ensure that the arrested person is not denied the right to consult and to be defended by a legal practitioner of his choice. The Magistrate should ask the person arrested brought before him whether in fact he has been informed of the grounds of arrest and whether he requires to consult and be defended by any legal practitioner of his choice. (DK Basu, Supra) After the pronouncement of this judgment by the Hon’ble Supreme Court, new Sections 41A to 41D have been added to prevent unnecessary arrest and misuse of powers. Denying a person of his liberty is a serious matter. 13. In terms of S. 41C, control rooms be established in every district. Names and addresses of the persons arrested and designation of the Police Officers who made the arrest be displayed. Control Room at State level must collect details of the persons so arrested. 14. The police officer must record all the proceedings conducted by him at the spot and prepare an ‘arrest memo’ indicating time, date of arrest and name of the relation/friend to whom intimation of arrest has been given. It must reveal the reasons for arrest. 15. Since the arrestee is to be taken out of his State to a place away where he may not have any acquaintance, he may be permitted to take along with him (if possible), his family member/acquaintance to remain with him till he is produced before the jurisdictional Magistrate. Such family member would be able to arrange legal assistance for him. 16. The arrested person must be produced before the jurisdictional Magistrate at the earliest, in any case, not beyond 24 hours from the date of arrest excluding the journey time so that arrest of such person and his detention, if necessary, may be justified by a judicial order. The 24 hours period prescribed u/s 57 Cr PC is the outermost limit beyond which a person cannot be detained in police custody. It does not empower a police officer to keep a person in police station a minute longer than is necessary for the purpose of investigation and it does not give him an absolute right to keep a person till 24 hours. 17. On arrival at the police station, the police officer must make an arrival entry in the record and indicate the investigation carried out by him, the person arrested and the articles recovered. He should also inform his senior police officers/SHO concerned about it immediately. The superior Police Officer shall personally supervise such investigation. 18. The police officer should effect arrest u/s 41(l)(b) Cr PC only when he has reasonable suspicion and credible information. He must satisfy himself about the existence of the material to effect arrest. There must be definite facts or averments as distinguished from vague surmises or personal feelings. The materials before him must be sufficient to cause a bona-fide belief. He cannot take shelter under another person’s belief or judgment. He must affect arrest at his own risk and responsibility as the effect of illegal arrest could be commission of offence of wrongful confinement punishable u/s 342 IPC. Burden lies on the IO to satisfy the Court about his bona-fide. No arrest can be made because it is lawful for the police officer to do so. Denying a person of his liberty is a serious matter. 19. Medical examination soon after arrest to avoid possibility of physical torture during custody should be conducted. 20. The IO must maintain a complete and comprehensive case diary indicating the investigation carried out by him. 21. The log book of the vehicle used for transportation must be maintained and signed. The IO must indicate whether the vehicle was official or a private one; name of its driver and how and by whom it was arranged. Only official vehicle should be used for transportation to the extent possible. 22. At the time of recovery of the prosecutrix, the police officer, if he is satisfied that she is adult, should ascertain from her at the spot, whether she was present there with her free will. If the victim/prosecutrix is not willing to accompany the police officer or her relatives, the police officer must not exert force on the prosecutrix to take her away against her wishes. However, if the prosecutrix/victim of her own accord expresses willingness to accompany the police officer/relatives, her consent in writing should be obtained at the spot. 23. In case where the police officer finds the victim/prosecutrix to be a ‘minor’, soon after recovery, she should be produced before the local Child Welfare Committee for further decision regarding her custody. She must not be made to stay in the Police Station during night hours. 24. Statement of the prosecutrix u/s 164 Cr.P.C. must be recorded at the earliest. 25. MHA/Central Govt/Commissioner of Police must frame suitable guidelines for police officers to render all suitable assistance. The failure to adhere to the rules/guidelines should render the police officer liable for departmental action as well as contempt of the Court.26. The public prosecutor should provide required assistance to the police officer visiting his State at the time of seeking transit remand. 27. The MHA/State Government should circulate the Rules/Guidelines/Notifications etc from time to time to the Police officers in the State to create awareness. Periodically training should be provided to the Police Officers to sensitize them. 28. Instructions/Guidelines of similar nature should exist in all the States/UTs for speedy, smooth and effective inter-State investigation. 29. The delinquent Police Officer can be directed to pay compensation under the public law and by way of strict liability.30. If, in case of urgency or other considerations in the interest of investigation, it is not found feasible to inform the police station encompassing the jurisdiction of the search, seizure, arrest or investigation before the event, this should be done soon after the search, seizure, arrest etc. has been conducted. Right to Legal Representation Article 22(1) of the Constitution of India states that a person who is arrested shall not be denied the right to consult, and to be defended by, a legal practitioner of his choice. Therefore, this mandatory procedural requirement, reiterated by the Supreme Court in the 1997 case of DK Basu v. Union of India, entails that the person arrested has to not only be informed of the grounds of such arrest, but should also be asked by the Magistrate as to whether he/she requires to consult and be defended by his choice of lawyer.  In the 2018 case of Gautam Navlakha v. State (NCT of Delhi), it had been submitted by the State the “seriousness of the offence and the urgency of the situation” may lead to overlooking the requirements of law in letter and spirit. However, the Delhi High Court observed that in such cases, the concerned Magistrate would have to be satisfied with the explanation offered for non-compliance – “the departure from the mandatory requirement of the Constitution and the CrPC ought not to be lightly countenanced”. Moreover, mere representation by a legal aid lawyer, without ensuring whether accused had the opportunity to consult a lawyer of her own choice, will not satisfy the requirement of Art 22(1) of Constitution, the High Court ruled. The Court also held that the mere fact that there was a legal aid lawyer representing the accused will not satisfy the requirement of Article 22(1), if it was not an effective representation. The Court noted that the legal aid lawyer in that case had not made any submissions before the Magistrate issued the transit remand order, and therefore the representation was merely “cosmetic”.Two parapraphs from the judgment are worthy of being quoted here :”Turning to the order dated 28thAugust 2018 of the learned CMM in the present case, the Court finds that a duty lawyer empanelled pursuant to the Scheme of the National Legal Services Authority (“NALSA‟), the statutory body under theLegal Services AuthoritiesAct, 1987(LSAA), wasshown representing the person arrested, i.e. the present Petitioner. However, the Magistrate does not appear to have asked the arrested person,as mandated by Article 22 (1) of the Constitution whether he wasinformed about the grounds of arrest and whether he wish to consult and bedefended by a legal practitionerof his choice. This requirement does not get diluted one bit only because the proceedings are for transit remand”.”There is no mention of thelegal aid lawyer having been made any submission whatsoever. The learned CMM did not even think it necessary to record any such submission. It thus appears to the Court that the appearance of the Duty lawyer for the Petitioner was cosmetic and not in thetrue spirit of Article 22(1) of the Constitution read with Section 12 (g) of the LSA which guarantees free legal aid to every person in custody.”. Also Read : Explainer : What Is ‘Transit Anticipatory Bail’? When Can ‘Transit Bail’ Be Granted?   Next Storylast_img read more

Continue Reading

redevgml

Enhanced contact tracing needed on both sides of border – GP

By on May 25, 2021

first_imgAudioHomepage BannerNews WhatsApp Derry draw with Pats: Higgins & Thomson Reaction Twitter Twitter Google+ By News Highland – October 20, 2020 Pinterest Harps come back to win in Waterford Enhanced contact tracing needed on both sides of border – GP A GP says the first covid lockdown was inevitable, the second unfortunate and if there’s a third it will be unforgivable.Dr Maitiu O’Tuathail says the inability to contact trace is [proving a major issue, and that must be addressed.He says we need to dramatically expand the contact tracing system. and include cross border tracing…….Audio Playerhttps://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/19otuathail-virus-add-alt-clip-tl-.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Facebookcenter_img DL Debate – 24/05/21 News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th WhatsApp RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Journey home will be easier – Paul Hegarty Facebook Previous articleEvening News, Sport and Obituaries on Tuesday October 20thNext articleCMO backs fines, saying Level 5 compliance is vital News Highland FT Report: Derry City 2 St Pats 2 Google+ Pinterestlast_img read more

Continue Reading

redevgml

City of Derry Airport should close over political impasse – Kelly

By on

first_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook Pinterest Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic WhatsApp By News Highland – July 2, 2018 WhatsApp Twitter Google+ News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Twitter FT Report: Derry City 2 St Pats 2 center_img Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Pinterest Previous articleHouse prices fall 1% in Donegal according to new reportNext articleSinn Féin launch campaign to reopen Short Stay Ward News Highland Facebook Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows DL Debate – 24/05/21 AudioHomepage BannerNews Google+ City of Derry Airport should close over political impasse – Kelly A Derry and Strabane District Councillor believes that the City of Derry Airport should close as it’s not up to the ratepayer alone to support it. Despite a £2.5 million funding commitment for the City of Derry Airport made by the Northern Ireland Executive in 2016, the money has yet to be released due to the on-going impasse at Stormont.Cllr. Patsy Kelly believes the money from the ratepayer could be better spent elsewhere and says the people of Derry and Strabane cannot continue to sustain the airport in the interim:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/patsfhgfhgfhy1pm.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.last_img read more

Continue Reading

redevgml

Norman shares insight on exhibit

By on May 24, 2021

first_img Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Email the author You Might Like What does it mean for you? Some say it will create jobs. Others, that it will stimulate the housing market and bring money for new infrastructure…. read more By Jaine Treadwell Book Nook to reopen Next Up“Quilts are comfort food,” she told her audience. “They are nostalgic. They are intimate in their warmth and they are functional. Quilts are valued as art and as life objects.”Norman said the African-American quilts were traditionally made from scrap cloth and were objects of unity and practicality.“These quilts were made of bold, bright, contrasting colors,” she said. “The shapes were usually large and many of them were appliqué symbols.” Published 7:26 pm Monday, February 16, 2009 Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Latest Stories By The Penny Hoardercenter_img Quilts are a metaphor for life, both individually and collectively.That’s the way Georgette Norman, executive director of the Rosa Parks Museum in Montgomery, explains the interest in and the love of “bed covers.”Norman was the guest speaker at the Johnson Center for the Arts and gave a “gallery talk” with the African-American quilt exhibit as a backdrop. Print Article Norman said strong colors were chosen so that the different warring tribes could be recognized from a long distance. The colors were also chosen to represent a rite of passage.“In quilt making, content was the most important thing,” she said. “Form was not that important. Content was what was important. And, if you stare at one of these African-American quilts long enough, you will hear the music it creates.”The quilt artists held a place of high respect. The quilts were a silent test to the creativity and courage of the quilter.With a few scraps, a quilt artist could turn them into something else – a functional item of beauty. Sponsored Content Norman shares insight on exhibit The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… These quilts, these metaphors for life, are examples of how different shapes, different colors, different sizes and different textures can come together to make something useful and something of beauty. How, out of diversity comes unity.“That’s like life,” Norman said. “We must recognize that we are each different but we if we work together and respect each other and stand together we can become all that we can be.”Norman founded the Alabama African-American Arts Alliance, a statewide organization and partnership program of the Alabama State Council on the Arts in 1992. She served as executive director of the organization for seven years.In addition to serving as executive director of the Rosa Parks Museum, Norman also works as an independent consultant in the arts education program design and implementation. Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Acid Reflux (Watch Now)Healthy LifestyleIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthGet Fortnite SkinsTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

Continue Reading

redevgml

‘It’s heartbreaking,’ says teen whose video of meeting her deported dad at the US-Mexico border went viral

By on May 18, 2021

first_imgiStock/Thinkstock(EL PASO, Texas) — Leslie Silva had yet to reach her teens when her father, Milo Silva, was deported for the third time.Since that deportation in 2012, Leslie, who now lives with her mother, two older sisters and two nieces in El Paso, Texas, has tried to spend every weekend with Milo, who lives in Ciudad Juarez in Mexico.“When I was little I didn’t know what was going on and why he was gone for such a long time,” Leslie Silva told ABC News. “But now that I understand, it’s just heartbreaking not having him here especially that we are at an age when a lot of things are happening.”The 18-year-old recently posted a video of her meeting her father after crossing the U.S.-Mexico border that quickly went viral with nearly 4 million views in less than a week.Shot by her sister, Ingrid Silva, the video shows the Eastlake High School graduate dressed in a purple graduation cap and gown, crossing the Yselta-Zaragoza Bridge to give her father “the honor of seeing her first” before she took part in the school’s June 3 graduation ceremony.“[Earlier] he was calm about it … The day of, at the moment he saw me, I saw his face light up and he started crying and I started crying,” she recalled fondly. “But they were all happy tears.”Even though he celebrated with the family over the phone, Milo has missed key family events including the wedding of his oldest daughter and the birth of his grandchildren.“It’s really heartbreaking not having him here with us. Who wouldn’t want their dad with us?” she said.At the beginning, when Milo, who currently works as a security guard at a factory, was struggling with getting small jobs, the family was often interrogated while crossing the border. Silva said that eventually border patrol stopped asking questions when they realized that the girls were going to meet their father.“We try to spend as much time as we can together when we go and do small things that we can as a family like go to the movies or go [out] eat or just be at the house,” she said. “But once we leave, it’s kind of sad, leaving him behind.”She added that the family isn’t nervous about their situation given the political climate.“We are used to [it],” she said nonchalantly. “The worst has already happened.”Leslie, who in the fall will attend UTEP in El Paso to study nursing, said she was often quizzed by her friends about her father’s absence growing up.“They didn’t really know [because] I wouldn’t tell anyone. I would just say, ‘Oh I am going to Ciudad Juarez’ and they would be like, ‘Oh, okay.’ They would ask me [where my dad is] and I would say he is not here. My parents are still together … But they wouldn’t really understand [because] I wouldn’t talk about it too much,” she explained.Leslie said that at first, most of the comments on her video on Instagram were negative.“They were just saying it was weird that my dad was deported three times, like how could that happen? Or they would focus on the smallest things in the video like the plastic bag he was holding,” she said. “My family agreed that we won’t let it affect us. People don’t really the story behind it and why we did things the way we did.”Laughing about her celebrity status, she said that she hopes to spread the awareness about the situation of families like hers.“There’s always a story behind someone they won’t know about and they don’t know what they go through. It’s not easy,” she said. “I got a lot of that in the comments they said, ‘Oh, why doesn’t he get his citizenship?’ [Because] it’s not easy.”Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Continue Reading

redevgml

Tropical Storm Fay path heading toward NYC, NJ, CT coast

By on

first_imgABC NewsBy MAX GOLEMBO, ABC News(NEW YORK) — A tropical storm warning for the entire New Jersey coast, New York City, Long Island and all of the Connecticut coastline has been issued as Tropical Storm Fay’s path moves north Friday.Fay has winds of 50 mph Friday morning and is moving north at 10 mph, according to the 5 a.m. National Hurricane Center advisory.On the radar and satellite composite map, Fay looks better organized Friday than it did Thursday.Tropical Storm Fay’s forecasted path shows it making landfall somewhere along the New Jersey coast in the next 12 hours.As the center of Fay makes landfall Friday, it will move right over or near New York City late Friday evening and then head north up the Hudson Valley and into Vermont on Saturday.Fay will bring heavy rain into the Philadelphia area later Friday morning and into New York City by the afternoon.The biggest threat with Fay will not be damaging winds, but will be flash flooding. Some areas could see 3 to 5 inches of rain by Friday night. In some areas, 7 inches of rain is possible.Winds will be gusty along the coast, 40 to 50 mph, but no major wind damage is expected from this weak tropical storm.There are flash flood watches from Maryland to Massachusetts. Also, tornadoes cannot be ruled out in the Mid-Atlantic and the Northeast Friday and Saturday with this tropical system.Tropical Storm Fay is already the sixth named storm of 2020 Hurricane Season, which is the earliest at this point in the year ever. In 2005, the busiest hurricane season on record, the sixth named storm was recorded on July 22.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Continue Reading

redevgml

Exclusive: Ewemove reveals speed of its transformation into a high street operator

By on May 7, 2021

first_imgHome » News » Agencies & People » Exclusive: Ewemove reveals speed of its transformation into a high street operator previous nextAgencies & PeopleExclusive: Ewemove reveals speed of its transformation into a high street operatorThe company now has six high street branded branches as it celebrates its fifth anniversary at a gathering outside Birmingham.Nigel Lewis26th January 20180935 Views Countrywide take note – former online-only brand Ewemove has revealed the speed at which it is transforming into a high street-but-hybrid branch network.The company, which is now part of The Property Franchise Group (TPFG), has told The Negotiator that of its 120 franchisees, six are now branded high street branches while 24 are either operating out of existing franchisee’s businesses or are being operated within ‘serviced office’.This was revealed at its recent annual jamboree, at which 150 agents from Aberdeen to Barnstaple gathered at The Belfry conference centre on the outskirts of Birmingham to celebrate the hybrid agent’s fifth birthday.News of its genesis from the internet onto the high street was revealed by Managing Director Nick Neill. He is a former Ewemove franchisee who, after the company was bought by TPFG and its founders moved on, was appointed to the top job.The gathering also heard presentations from Peter Knight from The Property Academy, James Sinclair from Entrepreneurs Network, and Alex Rose from Hometrack.Later in the day Ewemove also held an internal awards ceremony during which Chris Walthall won Franchisee of the Year. He operates Ewemove’s Leek and Hanley franchise in Yorkshire.Chris Walthall“Chris launched [his] business in 2014 with no industry experience and has gone on to operate one of the network’s most successful businesses,” says Nick Neill  (pictured, right).“The industry as a whole is continuing to face a number of challenges, but whilst other agencies are reporting stagnation and recurring profit warnings, we’re not only seeing our network grow in numbers month by month, but we’re witnessing the continued profitability of our franchisees across the UK.“With our unique hybrid model, offering our on-the-ground agents with the ability to provide a personal face to face service on a local level whilst benefiting from cutting edge technology and comprehensive support via our national operations centre, we’re in an exceptionally strong position for future growth and profitability and are very much looking forward to marking further successes over the months ahead.”Read more about Ewemove.Nick Neill The Property Franchise Group EweMove January 26, 2018Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021last_img read more

Continue Reading