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Fogarty and McCormack retire

By on June 23, 2021

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Connacht Caps: 28Ulster Caps: 38 (32 CL, 6 HC) Munster Caps: 11Name: Ronan McCormackDOB: 27th April 1977Birthplace:DublinHeight:1.78 m (5′ 10″)Weight:115 kg (18 st 0 lb)Position: PropClub: UCD RFCSchool: St. Mary’s College, RathminesLeinster Caps: 52 (3 tries)Leinster ‘A’ Caps:12 (v Oxford, Ulster x2, Ireland Under-20, Connacht x2, Crawshays, Munster x3, Enisei STM, Edinburgh)British & Irish Cup Caps: 5 (v Plymouth Albion, Cornish Pirates, Exeter Chiefs, Newport, Gael Force)Ireland ‘A’ Caps:9Ireland Universities Caps:12Ireland Schools Caps:4Leinster Under 19/20 Caps:7Leinster Schools Caps:3center_img Leinster Rugby can today announce the immediate retirements due to injury of two great servants for Leinster and Irish rugby; hooker John Fogarty (concussion) and prop Ronan McCormack (neck).Leinster Chief Executive Mick Dawson commented: “It is regrettable that both players are retiring due to injury. Both John and Ronan are immensely popular and talented individuals who each played a significant role in Leinster’s recent on-field success.“John joined Leinster in 2008 and has been a key figure for our province since that time, with his consistent form culminating in his first Ireland call-up on this year’s summer tour to New Zealand. A Heineken Cup winner, John represented Munster, Connacht and Leinster playing 165 matches over a career which spanned a decade.“Capped on nine occasions for Ireland ‘A’, Ronan was a key member of Leinster’s Heineken Cup and Magners League winning sides and was a consistent contributor during the 118 matches he amassed playing for Leinster, Connacht and Ulster. Ronan too can look back on his career with enormous pride and satisfaction.“I would like to thank both players for their outstanding commitment, professionalism and service to the game of rugby in Ireland. Everybody in Leinster Rugby wishes both John and Ronan and their families well in their future.”Name: John FogartyDOB: 18th October 1977Birthplace: Cork (raised Tipperary)Height: 1.78 m (5′ 10″)Weight:102 kg (16 st 0 lb)Position: HookerClub: De la Salle PalmerstonSchool: Rockwell CollegeLeinster Caps: 44 (2 tries)Leinster ‘A’ Caps: 3 (v Saracens, Bristol, Munster)British & Irish Cup Caps:1 (v Plymouth Albion)Ireland Cap: 1 (v New Zealand)Ireland ‘A’ Caps: 12 (3 as captain)Connacht Caps: 110 (83 Magners League, 27 Challenge Cup)last_img read more

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Future Faces – Ross Harrison and Cory Hill

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first_imgHill, who measures up at 6ft 4in and 17st 4lb, made 11 outings for the Blues this season, and as the player explains, it has allowed him to take tips from the best. “I have to thank Gareth Baber and Justin Burnell for picking me but I’ve learnt so much from the likes of Bradley Davies, Deiniol Jones and Paul Tito.”A raft of departures, including Tito and Jones, has left Hill, 20, hoping to clock up more minutes next season under new DoR Phil Davies. “Lots of players worked under Phil when he was with the Wales U20s and speak really highly of him, so I’m hoping for a few more run-outs at Cardiff Arms Park next year.”A product of Maesycoed, near Pontypridd, Hill is a Wales U16, U18 and second-season U20 cap who cut his teeth at Sardis Road in the Principality Premiership.First up is the small matter of the Junior World Cup. “It’ll be a special competition and I hope Wales do themselves justice,” says Hill.Rugby World Verdict: Hill’s leadership qualities and work-rate stand him in good stead. Owain JonesThis article appeared in the July 2012 issue of Rugby World Magazine.Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UK. Or you may prefer the digital edition on your MAC, PC, or iPad. 22.07.11 – Cardiff Blues Rugby Squad 2011/2012 -Cory Hill.© Huw Evans Picture Agency LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Ross Harrison(Sale Sharks)Ross HarrisonAS ONE Sale and England prop is reaching the end of his career, another is waiting in the wings to fill his boots. But Andrew Sheridan is not departing before leaving a lasting impression on 19-year-old Ross Harrison, and it’s no surprise to hear that the former Lymm High School student’s childhood hero was big Sheri.Harrison, who can play on both sides of the scrum, started playing rugby when a PE teacher introduced him to the sport in Year Seven. He has never looked back, and having just finished his first year as a full-time member of Sale’s academy, he’s in South Africa this month with England U20 to play in the Junior World Cup.Harrison played for Sale’s first team five times this season, including in Aviva Premiership matches against Exeter and Harlequins, both games which he admits were faster than anything he’d experienced before. But his national coach Rob Hunter stresses that Harrison is in fine physical shape, and says the young prop, who has played tighthead for England U20, has a big future ahead of him.“Ross is a hard worker and very coachable,” says Hunter. “He’s quiet but he picks up things very quickly. “Sale’s a very good place for him to be. There’s a good vibe about the place with a lot of young players coming through.”Time will tell if Harrison can help Sale become the superpower that CEO Steve Diamond desires.Rugby World Verdict: Harrison is a glimmer of the young talent emerging at Sale. Bea AspreyCory Hill(Cardiff Blues)Cory Hill (he)Cory Hill will lead Wales U20 out in the Junior World Cup in South Africa despite not having featured in the red shirt during the U20 Six Nations. The powerhouse lock was not injured, however, but instead donned the blue of his region, Cardiff, in the RaboDirect Pro12.It’s a decision that has paid off for the player and his country, as his head coach Danny Wilson explains. “We felt Cory’s development would be better served by playing for his region. In the past few months he has matured as a leader and his work ethic is first-rate.” Would you like to sign up to Rugby World’s excellent weekly email newsletter? Click here.For Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170last_img read more

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Key statistics for England v Fiji

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first_img TAGS: Fiji The 2015 Rugby World Cup kicks off with the hosts England taking on Fiji – a team the Red Rose has never lost to in five previous encounters.Previous meetingsNovember 2012: England 54 Fiji 12, TwickenhamOctober 1999: England 45 Fiji 24, Twickenham (RWC QF 1999)July 1991: Fiji 12 England 28, SuvaNovember 1989: England 58 Fiji 23, TwickenhamJune 1988: Fiji 12 England 25, SuvaLast encounterNovember 10, 2012 at Twickenham during the Autumn Internationals. England won 54-12.Try scorersEngland:Sharples 2, Penalty try, Monye, Johnson, Tuilagi 2Conversions: Flood 4Penalties: Flood 3Fiji:Matawalu, Kalou. Conversion: MatavesiPlayers who played in 2012 who also feature on FridayEnglandStuart Lancaster’s match day squad includes 12 players who fronted up against the Fijians at Twickenham back in 2012.Lancaster has opted with the tried and tested in his pack. Joe Marler, Tom Youngs, Dan Cole, Geoff Parling and Chris Robshaw all start tonight as they did in 2012.Tom Wood retains his spot in the squad. He starts tonight but featured on the replacements bench in 2012.In the back line, the only familiar starter is centre Brad Barritt. Ben Youngs and Mike Brown were substitutes in 2012 but start the game tonight. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS By David Marsh Dan Cole against Fiji at Twickenham in 2012 (Getty Images) England’s substitution bench also looks familiar to the 2012 match with Mako Vunipola, Joe Launchbury and Owen Farrell all named on Lancaster’s replacements bench this evening.FijiAlthough the Pacific Islanders have a new head coach at the helm, John Mckee has stuck with a number of the same players that former coach Inoke Male used during his time in charge.Seven of the starters from 2012 have retained their starting berth for tonight’s fixture as they hope to assuage the anguish of a heavy defeat the last time they faced England at Twickenhem.>>> Four Fiji players to watch in Rugby World Cup opener against England (videos)Fiji have stuck with the lock pairing from 2012 match of Apisolame Ratuniyarawa and Leone Nakarawa. They are joined in the pack by Manasa Saulo and Akapusi Quera, both of which also started at Twickenham in 2012.Centre Vereniki Goneva retains his starting spot on the Fijian midfield and Metuisela Talebula also featured as fly half in 2012, but starts at fullback tonight.Ospreys man Josh Matavesi is included again on the replacements bench, as he was in 2012. Total number of caps in starting XVsEngland: 444Fiji: 373Average age of World Cup squadEngland: 26.0 yearsFiji: 28.4 yearslast_img read more

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Saints and sinners: The weekend’s talking points

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first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Brilliant passes, hat-trick mania and Germany upset the odds – there’s lots to welcome THE SAINTSClub crackersWho needs the international stars? The two televised Aviva Premiership games at the weekend were belters.“A sensational game. The last 20, I could watch that every week,” said Austin Healey after Bath’s 32-30 seesaw win over Northampton that included a cracking solo try by Chris Cook and a brilliant flick pass by Ben Tapuai, one of the signings of the season.The BT cameras then shifted further west to capture the 35-35 draw between Exeter and Wasps, a ten-try humdinger of punch and counter-punch.The Guinness Pro12 also provided a cracker, with Connacht’s rally from 13-0 down to overcome Cardiff Blues.Some people think pro club rugby should stop during the Six Nations. Not me.Pass masterThe Wales-England match took top billing, of course, and it provided the pass of the season.Elliot Daly was only able to score his late winner because of Owen Farrell’s brilliant delivery, the flat, fizzing pass inviting the Wasps player onto the ball at full pelt so that he could elude Alex Cuthbert.Laid on a plate: Owen Farrell and Elliot Daly after the wing’s late winning try in Cardiff (Getty)It’s something South Africa’s sevens players do particularly well and Farrell’s stock is rising by the week.Phil Vickery says Farrell and Ross Moriarty are the two players he’d put in a Lions XV right now. He’s almost right – Moriarty may have to settle for the bench.Wunderbar!Qualifying for the 2019 World Cup got underway in Europe at the weekend. Georgia’s performance at RWC 2015 means they’ve already booked a place in Japan, throwing the door open for a less celebrated European rugby nation.Could Germany walk through that door? They began the new-look Rugby Europe Championship with a stunning 41-38 victory in Offenbach over Romania, eight places above them in the World Rankings.Oak choppers: Eric Marks, Jarrid Els and Samy Fuechsel celebrate Germany’s win (Bongarts/Getty)It was the Germans’ first win over the Oaks since 1938 and was achieved with five tries, the last of them by winger Marcel Coetzee just before full-time.“This win over Romania is crazy, historic,” said Germany’s Aussie-born scrum-half Sean Armstrong. If Italy and Georgia met in a play-off, my money would still be on Italy. Let’s allow the Rugby Europe Championship winners to take on the Six Nations wooden spoonists – whoever they may be each year – and then we’ll find out.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here.center_img Ten of the best: Joe Simpson scores the final try in the Exeter-Wasps thriller (Getty Images) Results in the Rugby Europe Championship over the next two years – other than those against Georgia – will count towards RWC qualification. Germany, who beat Uruguay in November and travel to Georgia next, are right in the mix.Hat-trick frenzyIt was difficult to keep up with the hat-tricks.CJ Stander became only the third forward to score a Championship hat-trick and the first Irish forward to do so since Keith Wood at the 1999 World Cup.Then team-mate Craig Gilroy scored the first Tier One hat-trick by a replacement since Springbok Deon Kayser the same year.Treble: Newcastle wing Vereniki Goneva touches down for his third try at Sale Sharks (Getty)If Gilroy was quick, it was nothing compared to Ospreys’ Dan Evans, who grabbed a hat-trick in seven minutes at Zebre – only Tim Visser has notched a faster treble in the Pro12.Vereniki Goneva, who once scored a Premiership hat-trick against Newcastle, this time scored one for the Falcons at Sale in a 26-24 nail-biter.And Worcester Valkyries wing Lydia Thompson crossed the line three times during England’s 63-0 rout of Wales, a match that can only hasten professionalism of the women’s game in the Principality and elsewhere.THE SINNERSItalian crumbleOn a weekend of such outstanding rugby, it was such a shame to see Italy subsiding as they did.The Azzurri missed 37 tackles against Ireland in Rome and the match was over as a serious contest even before Stander crossed for the bonus-point try after 34 minutes.Italy have conceded 12 tries in two home matches and next go to Twickenham, where we should expect more of the same.Dejected: Italy have conceded 96 points already and have away matches to come (Action Plus/Getty)Conor O’Shea is a fantastic coach and motivator, and just the man for Italy. But when he responds to calls for Six Nations promotion and relegation by saying we should be “careful what we wish for” he is wide of the mark.It’s not about relegating Italy, it’s about giving the best team from the next tier down, currently Georgia, access. The opportunity to prove they might do better.Even the Italian press is seeing the wisdom in that. ‘Sbriciolata d’Italia, Cambiamo subito‘ screamed one newspaper headline – Italy crumble, change is needed now. “We don’t deserve our place in the Six Nations,” they said.last_img read more

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What it’s like to…train with the All Blacks

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first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Imagining myself drilling the ball to within a metre, much like Henry Slade in the Premiership semi-final against Saracens, my compass is slightly skewed as I pull a kick to 10m out, and send a spiral kick a metre the wrong side of the corner flag. He who dares…loses, in my case.Come fly with me: Practising lifting at the lineoutWith the basics covered, the next skill was more complicated; being lifted at the lineout. Stepping up to add his penneth was 6ft 5in behemoth Fifita, who had announced himself on the Test stage with a frightening display of power running as he skittled would-be Pumas defenders in the Rugby Championship. In heavy Tongan accent, he explains how you can reach heights of 12 feet with the correct lift. Demonstrating how he gets in the air, he adds, “You have to get a spring in your step and make sure your lifters grab you by the thighs, not your shorts. Make sure you hold onto your jumpers.”As we were thrown up into the air – a slightly disconcerting feeling – Havili threw balls up to us to take ‘off the top’ as we pop the ball to an awaiting scrum-half and descend less than balletically.Last up was practicing what elite hookers refine day-in, day-out; the lineout throw. Sweeney said the key was to get a spring in your throwing motion and leave your hands pointing upwards so you got a upwards trajectory and spin. With a knackered right shoulder, I found it far trickier than it looks on TV. With Dylan Hartley and Jamie George both around the 95 per cent accuracy mark, you soon realize the difference between Test stars and mere mortals.Still got it: Jones whips a precision pass out wideWith our heads crammed full of useful tips, it was time to put them to practice with a final blast of touch rugby, while the All Blacks ‘coaches’ watched on. As we attempted some flicks, feints and offloads with moderate success, Barrett and Perenara, ambled over at the break to give some advice. “You’re doing too much running, you need to get some width to your play. Let the ball do the work. Play smarter.” Wise words indeed, as we finished the morning looking like something resembling a rugby team. A crisp Autumnal morning in South-West London saw a quartet of All Blacks showing the ropes to a group of eager, but limited journalists The genteel surroundings of the Lensbury Club on the bank of the River Thames was the location for a training session with a difference. Hosted by four All Blacks; World Cup winner Beauden Barrett, blindside Vaea Fifita, 39-cap scrum half TJ Perenara and Crusaders utility back David Havili, the task was simple, to improve the skills of a group of journalists whose best years were largely behind them.The morning was reminiscent of the Seventies game show, the Generation Game, where experts in their field demonstrate a skill before members of the public make a hash of replicating it to laughter from the gallery.We started off with the basics; kicking, passing and catching.Just like that: TJ Perenara shows the watching crowd how to send a pinpoint passRugby is supposed to be a simple game, so Perenara started by getting the assorted melee to start rifling passes into a round red hoop hanging off the left upright from 15m. “Try and leave your hands pointing in the same direction you want the ball to go”, he says, as a series of balls fizz wildly off-target. “That’s great guys. You’re doing well.” Perenara proffers, sympathetically.Next up, with skills coach Neil Sweeney chipping in, it’s kicking and catching practice. In pairs, we’re asked to kick to our partner about 15m away. We’re directed to kick the ball on a flat-trajectory. It’s looks like a toned-down version of Barrett’s now trademark kick-pass that has set up countless All Blacks tries, including Jordie Barrett’s slapdown for Ngani Laumape’s try in the Third Test. Watching intently, stroking his chin, is Havili. “Try and kick through the point of the ball and make sure your toes are pointing in the direction you want the ball to go,” he adds helpfully.Watch and learn: Beauden Barrett gives some tips for kicking from handWith our confidence buoyed and sun breaking through the early morning mist, we’re asked to change tack and loft the ball skywards with our partner catching the ball. After a few static takes, Sweeney asks us to push off our leading foot and take to the air, in the same way you see full-backs like Leigh Halfpenny and Mike Brown effortlessly doing in front of 70,000 fans.After taking a few balls cleanly, emboldened, I asked my fellow journalist to stick it up into the skies. Bad move. As the ball moves in the air and I shuffle my leaden feet toward the ball as it hurtles downwards. I manage to catch the ball slightly off balance and roll backwards in a less-than-gallant man. “Just like Liam Williams,” Barrett chuckles, picking up my Welsh accent, as I attempt to regain my composure. “What I always tell people is to tuck their elbows in so if the ball goes through the outstretched hands, the ball won’t go straight through the gap.” Point taken.Finish in the corner: The novices play while the experts look onThe final kicking exercise was about precision. From 35m out, with little wind, Sweeney asks us to kick for the corner. “Imagine it’s the last play of the game, lactic acid is building up in your legs and you’re six points down. You need to set up an attacking lineout for one final shot at victory.” While the brain told us we still had our mojo, our aching bodies told us to leave it to the professionals. With France, Scotland and Wales to navigate over the coming weeks, it was been a privilege to learn from the world’s number one side but we’ll be watching safely from the sidelines from now on.The All Blacks and Beauden Barrett are ambassadors of Tudor, the luxury Swiss watch makers. Visit tudorwatch.comlast_img read more

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Rugby Rant: Women’s rugby deserves far more respect

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first_imgIt’s time to give due credit, argues Wasps Ladies fly-half Flo Williams Standing tall: Wasps Ladies shirt launch (Wasps Ladies) “WOMEN’S RUGBY is a waste of time.” But it inspires the future generation of women to believe they can be whoever or whatever they want to be.“Women’s rugby isn’t a proper sport.” But it teaches girls that they’re physically able to compete in contact sports and to build their bodies for a physical purpose, not only to ‘look pretty’.“Women’s rugby is rubbish compared to men’s.” But it instils confidence in girls to challenge societal norms and be confident in carving their own future.The stories surrounding women’s rugby are a small example of the day-to-day gender stereotyping females go through. For example, being in a bar when that really friendly bloke asks what sport you play, then continues the quizzing including, but not limited to, questions like: “Oh I bet you couldn’t tackle me”, “Like actual full-contact rugby?”, “So which of you are lesbians then?”.Related: Best rugby shirts for womenSometimes it’s just easier to not mention you play.Unfortunately, the inequality in women’s rugby does not stop in social settings. The media have an extremely big part to play in the growth, and likewise stagnation, of the sport. To champion female rugby players, individually and collectively, in mainstream media allows society to get to know these faces, to begin to follow and support them in their sporting journeys. The media have the power to change how society sees women’s rugby. “The opportunity to portray players as equal to the Irish rugby fanbase was lost”A recent missed opportunity in the media saw the initial Irish rugby jersey launch only use male players and an e-fit on a model for the women’s jersey. The opportunity to portray these players as equal, alongside each other, to the Irish rugby fanbase was lost. This feeling was hugely recognised in the women’s rugby community across the world and the #enough movement was born.Those female Irish players were more than enough to wear that jersey and we have had enough of the same unjust scenarios happening in the media.Thousands of female players, from the grass-roots game to World Cup winners, posted stories and images across social media with the #IamEnough and #enough hashtags. To the credit of Canterbury – the Irish kit provider – they supported this movement, issued an apology and changed their brand pledges to always include female players in media/kit launches. Although it’s disconcerting that a global movement and a hugely negative social media reaction had to take place for equal representation to become the norm.The power of the women’s rugby community came together and the impact demonstrated the accumulative feeling of ‘we have had enough of this’.“Women’s rugby is a waste of time.” But it creates a powerful collective that inspires from within.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS This article originally appeared in the November 2020 edition of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

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¿Quieres orar?”. Innovadores evangelistas laicos llevan la Iglesia a la…

By on June 20, 2021

first_img Rector Pittsburgh, PA Por Pat McCaughanPosted Sep 5, 2012 Featured Events An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit an Event Listing Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Albany, NY Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Job Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Press Release Service Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Press Release Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Jobs & Calls Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Adrian Dannhauser y Matthew Lukens, innovadores evangelistas laicos con su cartel de “¿Quieres orar?”[Episcopal News Service] A Adrian Dannhauser, una innovadora evangelista laica, se le conoce por pararse a la hora del almuerzo en una concurrida calle de Stamford, Connecticut, con un cartel que dice: “¿Quieres orar?”.A veces ella agrega una invitación verbal a los que se le acercan. Otros pasan a veces por su lado, lentamente, se vuelven y regresan.“Te enterarías de la pérdida de un ser querido ocurrida el día antes”,  recuerda ella durante una reciente entrevista telefónica. “O [el que te dice], ‘mi esposa está teniendo dificultades en salir embarazada’.“Es una bella forma de evangelización”, afirmó con la voz conmovida. “Dar testimonio a las almas es un gran privilegio. Intentas compartir una experiencia. Intentas facilitar un encuentro con Dios.“La evangelización innovadora consiste en conectar mi historia [y] tu historia con la gran historia”.La ex abogada de Wall Street especializada en quiebras y restructuración, asiste ahora a la Escuela de Teología Berkeley en [la Universidad] de Yale. Junto con sus “compañeros en evangelización” Otis Gaddis III y Matthew Lukens, se encuentra entre un número creciente de evangelistas innovadores de la Iglesia Episcopal que está llevando la Iglesia a las calles y a la gente.“Uno no pretende cambiar la mente o el sistema de creencias de nadie”, dijo Dannhausser, de 34 años. “Oraré con cualquiera de cualquier fe y de cualquier manera que le resulte cómodo”.La evangelización innovadora, dice Gaddis, —en la actualidad diácono transicional y capellán de la Universidad de Maryland en College Park—  significa primero y ante todo, vivir de manera visceral la promesa bautismal de “buscar y servir a Cristo en todas las personas y amar a tu prójimo como a ti mismo”.“Se supone que Cristo ya está presente”, dijo Gaddis durante una reciente entrevista telefónica. “El objetivo no es llevar a la gente a la iglesia, sino revelar la presencia de la Iglesia entre tú y la personas con quien hablas”.Puede ser tan sencillo como iniciar una conversación con la persona que está al lado en la cola, o en un avión o en un café —algo que él ha hecho muchas veces.“Ser un evangelista innovador significa que estoy en disposición y puedo y deseo escuchar el relato espiritual de alguien y a su auténtico ser a través de esa historia y responder con un relato propio que pruebe que yo estaba realmente presente.“La mayoría de las personas no tienen con quien hablar”, dijo Gaddis, ex abogado de 32 años que fundó la Red de Evangelización Episcopal (EEN, por su sigla en inglés) en 2009 mientras era seminarista en Berkeley.Al principio, la organización creció a partir de la propia costumbre de los estudiantes de reunirse y crear un lugar discreto para compartir sus  experiencias de Dios y sus historias personales.“Adquirimos un montón de destrezas de cuidado pastoral de muchísimas formas, comenzamos oyéndonos unos a otros de una manera que nunca habíamos imaginado. Nos convertimos en una comunidad, descubrimos que el problema es que no hablamos de los temas que realmente importan, entre ellos nuestros asuntos espirituales”, apuntó.Para mayo de 2010, la EEN se había extendido hasta el Seminario de Teología del Pacífico en Berkeley, California. En la actualidad, hay capítulos en el Seminario del Suroeste en Austin, Texas, en el Seminario Teológico General de Nueva York, y en el Seminario Teológico de Virginia, en Alexandria. Gaddis espera que la EEN llegue a tener una presencia en todos los seminarios episcopales y que también incluya al laicado y al clero en la creación de nuevas comunidades espirituales episcopales.La EEN convoca a una conferencia sobre desarrollo misional, del 20 al 22 de septiembre, en el Seminario Teológico General, destinada a preparar a líderes de la Iglesia en el desarrollo de comunidades espirituales, y a dar testimonio y compartir mutuamente la imagen de Dios, confraternizar con personas y comunidades salvando las diferencias, y formar líderes misionales que puedan alimentar en otros la búsqueda de una auténtica vocación, dijo Gaddis.La conferencia está auspiciada por la Escuela de Teología Berkeley en Yale; el Ministerio Episcopal de Jóvenes Adultos/Universitarios; y las diócesis de Connecticut, Long Island, Maryland, Newark, Washington y Virginia.La evangelización innovadora es parte de la genuina vocación de Matthew Lukens. Él pasó gran parte del verano brindando limonada y entablando conversaciones con los transeúntes en las gradas de la catedral de San Pablo [St. Paul] en Boston, y ha servido de interino en El Cruce [The Crossing] una reciente comunidad de culto en San Pablo.“El objetivo era intentar crear un momento en que la gente pudiera detenerse y tener este tipo de encuentro diferente en su jornada, simplemente sostener una conversación con alguien y ofrecerle algo, usualmente limonada. También agua. Queríamos saber quiénes eran, cómo les iba y cuán lejos podíamos profundizar en esa conversación”.Lukens, de 25 años, se crió como bautista del Sur en Alabama y está bien consciente de las connotaciones que puede evocar la palabra “evangelista”. “En algunas tradiciones es tarea del evangelista transformarte para que seas a mi modo. Pero en la evangelización innovadora, debo tener una apertura para ser transformado, porque otras personas aportan luz de Dios a la conversación de la manera en que la han experimentado”.Él recordaba, riéndose, que después de su primera experiencia en la calle —de “quieres orar”— con Gaddis y Dannhauser, se dio cuenta de que “fue la Iglesia Episcopal la que llevó a este ex bautista del sur a una esquina para orar por la gente”.Sin embargo, la evangelización innovadora no consiste en convertir a la gente ni en llevarla a la Iglesia, explicó.“Para mí, la evangelización innovadora es fundamentalmente una disposición a encontrarse con otras personas. La considero un ejercicio espiritual. La oportunidad de profundizar en una conversación con otras personas, de escuchar sus pasiones, dónde ellos oigan la voz de Dios, háganse episcopales o no. Esas conversaciones se dan en poquísimos lugares de nuestras vidas que yo encuentro que la gente no tiene la oportunidad de compartir.Se trata, fundamentalmente, de formar una comunidad espiritual. “Es algo de lo que la gente también está hambrienta”, añadió. “Uno oye hablar del gran número de personas que no se identifica con ninguna religión o que dicen que son espirituales, pero no religiosos, pero lo que siempre falta en esos sitios es una comunidad para tener esa conversación”.Gaddis estuvo de acuerdo. “Tus oídos atentos se convierten en el terreno para la palabra que ya está allí”, dijo refiriéndose a las conversaciones espirituales. “Y eso es divertido, porque uno ve a personas que literalmente vuelven a la vida ante tus ojos, y eso es lo que la Iglesia puede ser”.El obispo Eugene Sutton ha comisionado a Buddy Coffey como evangelista laico en la Diócesis de Maryland.Él ha estado en el proceso de discernimiento, pero ha llegado a la conclusión que “el ministerio ordenado no era para mí”, dijo Coffey, un ex ingeniero de 62 años.Pero  Sutton reconoció “los extraordinarios dones de Coffey en presentarle el evangelio a las personas” y lo comisionó para servir como evangelista laico, enseñando, predicando y escribiendo acerca de la evangelización, así como relacionándose con otros en conversaciones espirituales y en la manera [que ellos tendrían] de comunicarle su fe a los demás.“Me gustaría comisionar a más evangelistas laicos”, dijo Sutton durante una entrevista telefónica reciente. “Por una cosa, ayuda a toda la Iglesia, ayuda a los individuos, porque un cierto número de esos individuos está buscando la manera de que la Iglesia reconozca sus dones e incluso los apoye de algún modo, aunque no fuese económicamente. Podría aliviar la presión que tenemos en el proceso de ordenación”.Coffey describe su vocación como un testimonio alegre que proclama mediante la palabra y el ejemplo la buena nueva de Dios en Cristo. “La gente siempre pregunta, ‘¿de qué se trata?’ Eso me permite comenzar una conversación que puede conducir o no a una conversión espiritual”.En el sur de California, Randy Kimmler, ayudó “inadvertidamente” a plantar la Comunidad del Espíritu Santo en el distrito de Silver Lake de la Diócesis de Los Ángeles hace aproximadamente seis años. Básicamente, él no hizo más que escuchar al Espíritu Santo, afirmó.“No es una iglesia. No es una misión. Es una anomalía y las diócesis de todo el país están tratando de ver que van a hacer con grupos como nosotros que están apareciendo por todas parte”, dijo él en el curso de una entrevista telefónica reciente.La Comunidad del Espíritu Santo (CHS, por su sigla en inglés) “comenzó como un grupo de estudio cuaresmal para seis o siete laicos” apuntó él.Resultó tan divertido que quisimos que continuara después de la Cuaresma. Y ellos quisieron añadirle la Eucaristía. Un sacerdote local la celebró y “luego dijimos ‘¿por qué no seguimos haciendo esto?”.Al grupo, organizado y dirigido por laicos, se le considera una comunidad cristiana innovadora emergente, dijo Kimmler  durante una entrevista telefónica el 28 de agosto.La CHS se sigue reuniendo regularmente los jueves por la noche en un espacio encima de un restaurante de la localidad. “Lo llamamos la Cena del Señor en tres platos. Lo primero que hacemos es ofrecerles pan y vino”.El primer plato es un tiempo de reunión, con refrescos y  canapés, camaradería y conversación. Se saluda a los recién llegados y aquellos con quienes han estado conversando se los presentan al grupo.El segundo plato incluye escuchar la palabra, una respuesta o reflexión de cinco minutos, seguida por un tiempo para que los miembros del grupo compartan. Un sacerdote —de una lista aproximada de 20 que se turnan— celebra la Eucaristía.El último planto “es el postre. Limpiamos el altar y servimos el postre y las personas pueden quedarse y conversar todo el tiempo que quieran”, explicó Kimmler.La evangelización del grupo es también singular —al compartir su espacio con exposiciones de arte mensuales que muestran el mundo de los músicos, escritores, escultores y pintores, dijo.Kimmler presentará un taller en la EEN acerca de la plantación de iglesias por los laicos.–La Rda. Pat McCaughan es corresponsal del Servicio de Prensa Episcopal. Está radicada en Los Ángeles. Traducido por Vicente Echerri. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest ¿Quieres orar?”. Innovadores evangelistas laicos llevan la Iglesia a la callecenter_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Tampa, FL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Youth Minister Lorton, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Smithfield, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Belleville, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME last_img read more

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Palmer Trinity School welcomes Patrick H. F. Roberts as new…

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first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Press Release Service Tags Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Albany, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Youth Minister Lorton, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit an Event Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Press Release Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA [Palmer Trinity School press release] “After an extensive nationwide search, Palmer Trinity has found the right person to lead the school and continue our mission of academic excellence and social responsibility. Patrick’s exceptional record of success in institutional advancement is a strong asset that complements the traditions of our school and meets the needs of our diverse community. We are thrilled to welcome Patrick and his family to our community,” stated Michael Baiamonte, Chairman of the Board.Roberts has more than twenty years of educational leadership and administrative experience in the private school sector. He and his wife and four children moved from Nashville, Tennessee, where he most recently served as Associate Head of School and Head of Advancement for Battle Ground Academy. Additionally, Roberts was Headmaster of St. James Episcopal School in Texas; Head of Middle School, Episcopal School of Arcadiana in Louisiana; Director of Admissions and Financial Assistance at the University Liggett School, and spent several years in various roles including educator, admissions, external relations, and development at Montgomery Bell Academy in Tennessee.“My vision for Palmer Trinity School is that all members of the community, in and out of the classroom, learn with curiosity and critical examination. Moreover, it is my belief that each of our graduates should leave the School with a commitment to service learning, environmental stewardship, and a greater understanding of themselves and of their responsibilities in a global society,” stated Roberts.Roberts holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from the University of Richmond, and a Master of Education in Educational Leadership and Administration and Supervision from Lipscomb University in Tennessee. He is a resident of Palmetto Bay, Florida.About Palmer Trinity School:Palmer Trinity School—a coeducational, Episcopal day school—provides a rigorous college preparatory curriculum that integrates knowledge, compassion and social responsibility, an essential goal of the school’s mission. Palmer Trinity School serves students from a broad range of socio-economic, ethnic, and religious backgrounds in grades 6-12. For more information about the school, visit www.palmertrinity.org. To follow Palmer Trinity School on Facebook, click here. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Featured Jobs & Calls Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Posted Sep 11, 2014 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY People Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Tampa, FL Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Palmer Trinity School welcomes Patrick H. F. Roberts as new head Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Events Rector Collierville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Job Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Martinsville, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Bath, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ last_img read more

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Roman refugee center petitions all to ‘Welcome the Stranger’

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first_img Rector Collierville, TN Advocacy Peace & Justice, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books World Refugee Day Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Refugees Migration & Resettlement, Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Press Release Service Submit an Event Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Immigration, Tags Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Press Release Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Anglican Communion, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Roman refugee center petitions all to ‘Welcome the Stranger’ World Refugee Day resources include liturgy for Anglican Communion This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Tampa, FL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Youth Minister Lorton, VA [Episcopal News Service] The refugee experience is a fundamental part of the Christian story and “by welcoming a stranger, we are welcoming the very Christ and God that we proclaim,” says the Rev. Austin Rios, rector of St. Paul’s Within the Walls Episcopal Church in Rome, Italy.The crypt of St. Paul’s is home to the Joel Nafuma Refugee Center, a ministry of radical hospitality in the heart of Rome where hundreds of refugees can find a breakfast and a host of other resources to survive and to rebuild their lives. Because of the sheer numbers of Africans migrating across the Mediterranean Sea to escape persecution, many drowning en route, Italy is at the center of the most current migrant crisis.Each year, World Refugee Day is observed on June 20. With the global refugee crisis at its worst level since World War II, St. Paul’s wanted to offer the Anglican Communion the gift of liturgical and other resources or use in congregations on Sunday, June 21 (the closest Sunday to World Refugee Day) as part of its “Welcome the Stranger” campaign to raise awareness of refugees and their struggles, and to encourage a more compassionate response to their journey. It’s an initiative that is supported by the American Embassy to the Holy See.Eucharistic resources, adapted from a General Theological Seminary liturgy, was prepared by Rios and Young Adult Service Corps missionaries Jared Grant and Will Bryant, whose experiences at the Joel Nafuma Refugee Center inspired them to prepare the resources for World Refugee Sunday.“World Refugee Day gives us Christians a chance to practice what we preach,” said Bryant, who is serving his second year as a YASC missionary and succeeded Grant in 2014 as a volunteer at the refugee center. “It gives us an opportunity to speak on behalf of those who have no voice. It allows us to honor those it is easy for us to forget: the millions of refugees living on the periphery of society. They are poor, they are homeless, but they are still the body of Christ.”Bryant, whose YASC placement will conclude in August, said that a Communion-wide observation of World Refugee Day is needed now more than ever with the refugee crisis at record levels.“We need to change the dynamic and lives of refugees [and] change the attitudes of people towards them,” he told ENS via a Skype interview from Rome, where at the center the refugees are known as “guests” by the many volunteers from different faith communities. “It’s about inspiring people to welcome the stranger rather than push them away.”Global migration movements and their casualties affect everyone, he said, and responding to the needs of refugees “falls on not a single country or a continent but on the whole human race. My hope is that people all over the world will mark this special occasion, and that when we come together on June 21, we will pledge to ourselves and to the world that we will welcome the strangers in our midst. After all, and this is especially true for Americans, we were all immigrants once.”Resources also have been prepared by the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society – the legal and canonical name under which The Episcopal Church is incorporated, conducts business and carries out mission – to observe World Refugee Day in dioceses and congregations throughout The Episcopal Church.The resources include worship materials and a bulletin insert for Sunday, June 21; an interactive map of World Refugee Day events across The Episcopal Church; and information about where to find an Episcopal Migration Ministries affiliate and local volunteer opportunities.“In observance of World Refugee Day, the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society invites Episcopalians to learn more about how The Episcopal Church welcomes and resettles refugees in partnership with our 30 resettlement affiliates in 26 dioceses” across the United States, said Bishop Stacy Sauls, chief operating officer of The Episcopal Church, according to a media release.Deborah Stein, director of Episcopal Migration Ministries the refugee-resettlement agency of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society, said that World Refugee Day, established by the United Nations General Assembly in 2000 to honor the contributions of refugees throughout the world and to raise awareness about the growing refugee crisis, “is especially significant this year as the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society continues to celebrate its 75th year of this life-saving ministry.”For the 75-year celebration, the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society has launched #ShareTheJourney, a multimedia effort “to educate, form, and equip Episcopalians to engage in loving service with resettled refugees and to become prophetic witnesses and advocates on behalf of refugees, asylees, migrants, and displaced people throughout the world.”This is not the first time The Episcopal Church has responded with resources to focus on refugee problems: During the child-migrant crisis at the U.S.-Mexico border in 2014, many churches found ways to comfort and welcome unaccompanied minors and help them through their bureaucratic maze.“I’ve had the opportunity to witness firsthand the compassionate and inspiring work of the JNRC, and to hear from their guests about how the welcome they receive there is so vital to their ability to assert their humanity amidst some truly desperate circumstances,” said Stein, who led a pilgrimage to Africa’s Great Lakes region in March to study the plight of refugees. “As Episcopalians celebrate the work we do here in the United States to welcome refugees, World Refugee Day is a reminder that we are joining with Anglican and Episcopal churches throughout the world in this important ministry.” The Joel Nafuma Refugee Center was dedicated in 1995 and provides a sanctuary for refugees to seek advice and assistance at St. Paul’s Within the Walls, a parish in the Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe. The center offers breakfast, distributes toiletries and items of clothing, assists with job applications, and provides services for refugees to learn languages and computer skills.Through a navigator program, a trained cultural mediator accompanies the refugees to asylum hearings or appointments with lawyers and doctors, Rios explained in a recent reflection essay. For more than two years, a group of artisans has been making and selling handicrafts. Each artisan piece is accompanied by a story that advocates and educates about the plight of refugees in Rome. The artisans share proceeds among themselves and donate back to the center.“Christians follow and worship a Lord who not only ‘came down from heaven,’ migrating in the mystery of the Incarnation, but who only days after his birth was forced to flee to a foreign land because of a governmental campaign of infanticide,” Rios told ENS. “Jesus experienced both welcome (from Mary and Joseph, shepherds, magi, animals) and rejection (from Herod) from his birth …­ a dynamic that would continue throughout his earthly life.“Jesus commissioned his earliest disciples to carry out his mission when in Matthew 10:40 he said: ‘Whoever welcomes you welcomes me, and whoever welcomes me welcomes the one who sent me,’” Rios explained.“As inheritors of this tradition of commission, and its attending responsibilities to both receive and extend the hospitality that God has offered us, we are called to offer this welcome as well, especially as it relates to those who are vulnerable because of itinerancy or forced migration,” said Rios, “not only because welcoming is a proper human response to suffering, but because it is an essential part of our faith DNA. … Welcoming is never easy; it involves sacrifice. But if we are to believe in God’s promises, then we know that from such sacrifice comes the joyful, abundant and shared life that underwrites our salvation.”Along with St. Paul’s, St. John’s Cathedral in Hong Kong and The Cathedral of All Souls in Asheville, North Carolina, have pledged to celebrate World Refugee Sunday with the special liturgy on June 21.The resources also include downloadable reflections written by faith leaders and guests of the Joel Nafuma Refugee Center coming from war-torn countries in the Middle East and Africa with the intention that parishioners may seek to understand more deeply the plight of refugees in today’s migration crisis.“Helping put refugees at ease means not only providing food, water, and shelter, but also helping learn a language, go to school, and find work,” said Bishop Pierre Whalon of the Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe in a June 2 reflection essay on the center’s website. “The benefits of welcoming are great, including economic and social. The penalties for refusing to welcome the stranger are severe. In the teachings of Christ, it is a matter of life and death, not only for the migrant but for us all.”This is a time of extreme crisis for migrants all over the world, especially those traveling from North Africa across the Mediterranean Sea, according to a press release from St. Paul’s. In April, more than 900 migrants aboard one vessel died trying to cross from Africa to Italy. “This senseless tragedy was the focus of mainstream news media for a week. It brought to light the ongoing struggles of refugees everywhere,” the release noted. “But then, as quickly as it had appeared, the issue vanished from the headlines and the public eye. We celebrate World Refugee Day as a statement to the world that we have not forgotten refugees, even if the rest of the world has simply changed the channel. We stand united to welcome the strangers in our midst.”— Matthew Davies is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME By Matthew DaviesPosted Jun 3, 2015 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Smithfield, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Bath, NC Submit a Job Listing Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET last_img read more

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Hoping for reconciliation, church offers to settle South Carolina lawsuit

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first_img Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Press Release Press Release Service Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Martinsville, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 South Carolina Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Comments are closed. Featured Events Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Featured Jobs & Calls Tags Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK January 24, 2016 at 10:35 pm Episcopal Church will lose. Wait and see how many churches and dioceses pull out from this suspensions and if TEC does not repent. Will go broke in months and ACNU will buy up the properties. [The Episcopal Church in South Carolina press release] Episcopalians who are seeking to end the bitter legal battle over church property in eastern South Carolina have presented a settlement agreement to a breakaway group, offering to let 35 parishes keep their church properties, whether or not they choose to remain part of The Episcopal Church.In exchange, the proposal would require the breakaway group to return the diocesan property, assets and identity of “The Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina” to the diocese that is still affiliated with The Episcopal Church.“From the beginning of this dispute, we have hoped for reconciliation with people in the churches affected by this sad division,” said the Rt. Rev. Charles G. vonRosenberg, bishop of The Episcopal Church in South Carolina. “We see this offer as the strongest possible way we can demonstrate that.”(See below for a list of the 35 parishes included in the settlement proposal.)The offer was made with the consent of Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, and was presented to attorneys June 2. No response has been received.Leaders of The Episcopal Church in South Carolina have made reconciliation a key goal since the beginning of this dispute. Discussions about releasing the parish properties have been going on since early 2013, a few months after the split occurred.“In a situation like this, where there has been so much grief and misunderstanding caused by the actions of a few, we pray that a gracious response to those who are now separated from us will hasten the day when we can be together as one unified diocese again,” vonRosenberg said.If accepted, the offer would end the legal dispute that began in January 2013 when the breakaway group sued The Episcopal Church, and later its local diocese, seeking to control both diocesan and parish property and the identity of the diocese. It also would resolve a federal lawsuit currently before the U.S. District Court in Charleston.The Episcopal Church in South Carolina reorganized the diocese in early 2013 and operates with a part-time staff and a sharply reduced budget funded primarily by contributions from the 30 remaining Episcopal congregations. Meanwhile, the diocesan assets have been in the control of the breakaway group led by Mark Lawrence, who was bishop in 2012 when he announced the diocese was leaving The Episcopal Church.The breakaway organization is now operating separate from any larger religious body. The Episcopal Church in South Carolina remains part of The Episcopal Church and the Anglican Communion.In February, a state court judge awarded the properties and identity of the diocese to the breakaway group. Episcopalians have appealed to the South Carolina Supreme Court; oral arguments are set for September 23.In preparing the settlement offer, diocesan leaders worked closely with Episcopalians who had been members of breakaway parishes and were left without church buildings in which to worship when the split occurred. Most have moved ahead and created new Episcopal congregations, and gave their blessing for the settlement offer to be made.“Buildings are important, but what is most important is the people who are in them,” Bishop vonRosenberg said. “It is the people that we long to welcome back into The Episcopal Church once again.”Churches included in the settlement proposal(All these parishes are plaintiffs in the lawsuit against The Episcopal Church and The Episcopal Church in South Carolina)All Saints, FlorenceChrist Church, Mount PleasantChrist the King, WaccamawChrist-St. Paul’s, Yonges IslandChurch of the Cross, BlufftonEpiphany, EutawvilleGood Shepherd, CharlestonHoly Comforter, SumterHoly Cross, StateburgHoly Trinity, CharlestonOld St. Andrew’s, CharlestonChurch of Our Saviour, John’s IslandPrince George Winyah, GeorgetownRedeemer, OrangeburgResurrection, SurfsideSt. Bartholomew’s, HartsvilleSt. David’s, CherawSt. Helena’s, BeaufortSt. James, James IslandSt. John’s, FlorenceSt. John’s, John’s IslandSt. Jude’s, WalterboroSt. Luke’s, Hilton HeadSt. Luke and St. Paul, CharlestonSt. Matthew’s, DarlingtonSt. Matthew’s, Fort MotteSt. Matthias, SummertonSt. Michael’s, CharlestonSt. Paul’s, BennettsvilleSt. Paul’s, ConwaySt. Paul’s, SummervilleSt. Philip’s, CharlestonTrinity, Edisto IslandTrinity, PinopolisTrinity, Myrtle Beach Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Paul Lustig says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Belleville, IL Hoping for reconciliation, church offers to settle South Carolina lawsuitcenter_img Rector Tampa, FL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Bath, NC Property, The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Music Morristown, NJ Posted Jun 15, 2015 Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Washington, DC Comments (1) Submit a Job Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Collierville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MIlast_img read more

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