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Seeds salad chef came to ’SC during recession

By on September 17, 2020

first_imgPaul Linaman was working as a barista at Peet’s Coffee and Tea when the company began making changes that included firing some of its best employees at a time when unemployment rates were soaring.“It was a company that had been going through all these transitions,” Linaman said. “The transition was very rough. I was really upset at the time, but [being fired] turned out to be a really good thing.”Lettuce talk · Salad chef Paul Linaman (right) chats with Soon Gon Kim (left), a sophomore majoring in fine arts, outside of Seeds Marketplace. – Ani Kolangian | Daily TrojanLinaman, now a salad chef at Seeds Marketplace, took the job loss as an opportunity to improve his culinary skills. At the time, his mother was the associate director of St. Joseph’s Center, a service center for poor and homeless families, which acquired an unused restaurant as a donation. The donated location served two functions: providing free restaurant-style meals for the homeless and providing what Linaman calls “crash-course culinary training” for chefs of varying skill levels.“It was a wide variety of people,” Linaman said. “It was people who were just out of college, like one young woman who, her whole life, had worked with her mom’s catering business, but now wanted to get a job at a restaurant. It was people who had been laid off, usually people in the industry who wanted a little extra training in order to get their careers going again.”After the course, Linaman worked at the Hard Rock Cafe in Hollywood but said he lost his position when the franchise laid off about two-thirds of its chefs. He once again refused to let the loss of a job he loved discourage him, so after a few weeks off, he applied for a job with USC Hospitality in 2010.During a kitchen test, Linaman made pasta primavera but had to turn to improvisation when he ran out of time to cook the noodles after finishing the meat and vegetables.“I called it ‘Paleolithic primavera’ because I noticed that sometimes on Top Chef, when they mean to make something but run out of time, they sometimes make up stories and the judges usually love it,” Linaman said. “My story was that it’s part of the trend of being on the Paleolithic diet, where you eat as if you’re a hunter-gatherer.”Linaman was already familiar with this audition-like application process and had previously developed his improvisation skills after growing up in Los Feliz, where he became involved in performing arts at a young age.“As soon as there was any theater available to be involved in, I was,” Linaman said. “As soon as I was in junior high and they had drama class, I started taking that. I was really involved in play production in high school.”After attending Santa Monica College, he transferred to New York University to study theater, where he participated in many student productions. His favorite was a play about the last days of the Trojan prophet Cassandra.“It was interesting because it was an original play, and [the professor] was rewriting it while we were working on it,” Linaman said. “The author was right there so we could ask her questions. I could tell that she was rewriting based on what she saw.”After college, Linaman moved back to Los Feliz. He said that, despite his love for theater, he did not want to enter into the competitive world of Broadway. He has not been involved in any formal productions since his return to California but is interested in returning when the opportunity arises. He has found, however, that some theater school lessons apply to other aspects of his life.“When I’m making salads, the physical structure of it is kind of a choreographic narrative,” Linaman said. “Being able to focus on that is very theatrical. It’s the capacity to put yourself in structures, and live within the structures in a particular way.”Linaman’s theatrical experiences also led to an interest in psychoanalysis, something he is now interested in pursuing in graduate school.“There’s a few professors who I want to meet but haven’t quite had the courage to just walk into their offices,” Linaman said. “I didn’t even realize they taught here when I first started reading [their books].”He has been considering USC for a master’s degree in comparative literature, a program that would not only allow him to further his education but perhaps give him the chance to meet some of his favorite writers.last_img read more

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10 things we’ll miss most without Big Ten, Pac-12 football

By on August 13, 2020

first_imgThe Big Ten and Pac-12 both canceled football season Tuesday — an almost-incomprehensible blow for their 26 FBS schools that will not play in 2020.We’re going to miss both conferences dearly this season, if there is one. Nine teams in Sporting News’ preseason top 25 rankings were from either the Big Ten or Pac-12. The conferences will lose revenue, and so many exciting games are off the schedule now. The Big Noon Kickoffs and Pac-12 After Dark won’t be there, either. MORE: Big Ten commish Kevin Warren makes right call, but did it come at wrong time?What will we miss most about those conferences in 2020? Here are 10 things that come to mind:Big Ten trophiesThe Big Ten has the single-greatest collection of rivalry trophies in all of college football. It’s a never-ending state fair with the Floyd of Rosedale, Illibuck, Little Brown Jug and Paul Bunyan’s Axe, just to name a few. We love those trophies, and will miss them dearly in 2020.Playing to win the gameThe Sun Devils were on the upward spring with a 15-11 record the last two seasons under Herm Edwards. Perhaps they were ready to challenge USC and Utah for a Pac-12 South championship — maybe even a Rose Bowl run. Sophomore quarterback Jayden Daniels was a part of that, and looked ready to lead Arizona State to heights missed since the Jake Plummer days.Rowing the BoatP.J. Fleck had Minnesota on the right track after an 11-win season, and it was OK to wonder out loud if the Gophers were ready to take down Wisconsin for a Big Ten West championship. The tenor of that changed a bit when star receiver Rashod Bateman opted out, but quarterback Tanner Morgan was one of the top returning quarterbacks in the Big Ten. Perhaps Fleck and Edwards could have squared off in that Rose Bowl. The news conferences — excuse us, Zoom conferences — would have been entertaining.MORE: Warren’s role as Big Ten’s bad news bearer isn’t his fault, but it is his problemBig Ten-Pac 12 showdownsThe first two weeks of the season would have featured Michigan at Washington and Ohio State at Oregon: games that could have granted credibility-establishing wins for both sides. The Wolverines would have had a new starting quarterback — when will Dylan McCaffrey ever play? — against Washington coach Jimmy Lake in his debut. The showdown between the Ducks and Buckeyes would have been the first top-10 showdown of the season, and a huge piece of the College Football Playoff puzzle. We won’t get to see a defense that featured Kayvon Thibodeaux and Justin Flowe take on Ryan Day’s offensive machine in Autzen Stadium.Clay Helton hot-seat talkIt has an annual tradition at USC since 2016. The Trojans were supposed to open with Alabama at Jerry World, but the tweaked Pac-12 schedule would have featured USC at UCLA in the opener, which would have been fantastic. Helton had a talented offense led by sophomore Kedon Slovis and Biletnikoff Award candidate Amon-Ra St. Brown. Seriously, we’re not going to hear “Fight On” all fall?Scott Frost on the spotNebraska has made it clear it still wants to play, and that might lead to a — wait for it — frosty relationship with the Big Ten moving forward. Frost had a 9-15 record through two seasons with the Huskers, and the pressure was on to get the program back into the mix for a Big Ten West championship. It will be interesting to see where Nebraska goes from here, but it will have to wait to get back on the national stage.MORE: Answering questions on COVID-19 and what’s next for 2020 seasonWhite Out gameFans weren’t going to attend anyway, but not having a “White Out” game — which is on the short list of greatest spectacles in college football — for the Ohio State game is a big miss. That is the game that has defined the season for both teams the last four years; the winner has gone on to win the Big Ten championship.Justin FieldsHe was the only returning Heisman Trophy finalist from last season, and he presumably won’t get to come back for an encore with the Buckeyes. We believed all along that Fields would be even better in his second season in Day’s system. Ohio State had skill-position talent all over the place around him, including Oklahoma transfer Trey Sermon and sophomore receiver Garrett Wilson, among others. The Buckeyes had a chance to be the highest-scoring team in the nation and were a sound bet to win a fourth straight Big Ten championship. That will take a long time for fans in Columbus to come to grips with what could have been. Oregon-USC (twice?)That would have been our pick for the Pac-12 championship game, and it’s the game the conference needed to elevate it back to Playoff status. They were scheduled to play in the regular season, but imagine what could have been with both teams marching into the conference game with one-loss records. Perhaps the Pac-12 might have gotten a playoff spot this year.MORE: Big 12 could decide whether college football happens in 2020’The Game’We lose so many great rivalries, but this remains the best rivalry in college football. It doesn’t matter that it was supposed to be played on Oct. 24. Last week, we were talking about a spat on a Big Ten coaches call between Harbaugh and Day. We were wondering whether the Buckeyes really could put 100 on the Wolverines, and what it would mean for Harbaugh to drop to 0-6 in “The Game.” Or perhaps Michigan could have won at The Shoe for the first time since 2000. Either way, The Game — the one that drives the most headlines in the regular season and offense — will not be played. That still hurts the most.last_img read more

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Will water quality politics turn the tide towards more ag regulation?

By on December 17, 2019

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Earlier this week a University of Michigan Water Center study focused on the Maumee River Watershed was released and has caused more than a few ripples in the ongoing agriculture blame game with regard to Lake Erie water quality.The study used computer modeling to look at different management and policy scenarios that could achieve the goals set to reduce phosphorus levels entering Lake Erie by 40%. The policy alternatives described as “most promising” by Jay Martin of Ohio State University (co-author of the study) included increased use of the existing best-management practices and conversion of croplands to switchgrass or other grasses. One possible scenario that the study determined could achieve the 40% reduction goal suggested removing nearly 30,000 acres in the watershed from agricultural crop production.“The study really criticizes Ohio farmers for not implementing best management practices on managing the nutrients and fertilizer they put on the land. We’re really concerned about that. We know that Ohio farmers are doing the best they can to keep the nutrients on the field. We felt that this study was kind of a punch in the gut to Ohio farmers and we really feel like we need to punch back,” said Kirk Merritt, with the Ohio Soybean Council. “We don’t think it is even good research. It is essentially a bunch of computer simulations and from that they are extrapolating new policy and new mandates that we really think would be a detriment to Ohio agriculture and the farmers that we represent.”Listen to the full conversation between Merritt and Ohio Ag Net’s Dale Minyo regarding the research.Kirk Merritt Michigan Study responseThe study quickly generated agricultural blame for Lake Erie’s water woes. The Associated Press had a story on the study that generated headlines such as this: “Report: Farmers doing too little to stop Lake Erie algae.” In the AP story, Ohio Farm Bureau’s Joe Cornely was critical of the limited focus of the study to agriculture in a specific region, but Cornely’s more agriculturally friendly (and reality-based) sentiments near the end of the story were largely swamped in the mire of algae-panic-inducing policy promoters.When talking about the interview and subsequent AP story, Cornely expressed more dissatisfaction with the research.“Our biggest concern with the report is that it proposes some very impractical solutions that could have severe economic and social consequences. Worse, it creates unrealistic expectations among the public. There are no scenarios under which the problem gets fixed immediately,” Cornely said. “Another concern is that it singles out the Maumee watershed, which according to the Army Corp of Engineers, contributes 40 percent of the nutrient load. Why give the impression that the whole problem can be fixed solely by farmers in a single geography?”The Columbus Dispatch version of the story included this first sentence: “Farming practices in western Ohio must undergo major changes if there is any hope of reducing the toxic algae blooms that plague Lake Erie every summer, according to a new study.”Jeff Reutter, the former director of Ohio State University’s Sea Grant and Stone Laboratory, was quoted in Dispatch story saying: “Based on the report, it seems foolish for anyone to say ‘We only want to do this voluntarily.’…I think we’re at the point that we have to recognize that you can’t do it only voluntarily. … So what kind of policies do we need, including regulations, incentives, whatever they might be, to get that amount of participation?”Needless to say, the Ohio agricultural organizations that have collectively contributed millions of dollars in funding to address agriculture’s role in water quality issues were less than pleased with the general tone of the stories that have been widely circulated since the release of the University of Michigan study. Chad Kemp, President of the Ohio Corn & Wheat Growers Association and Adam Graham, President of the Ohio Soybean Association worked together on this joint statement on the study.“A recent study released by the University of Michigan has received significant attention. Ohio Corn & Wheat and the Ohio Soybean Association have major concerns about the unrealistic, one-size-fits-all approach of the study and the calls for additional regulations.“The study’s authors also charge that Ohio farmers will not voluntarily adopt practices necessary to protect water quality. We know farmers have already done so.“We are very disappointed that a representative of The Ohio State University (OSU), who co-authored the study, stated that the ‘most promising’ scenario was to reduce food grown in our state by eliminating farmland equal to the size of Dayton, hurting many small family farms. This is unrealistic, disregards the positive economic impact of grain farming in Ohio, and the need to grow food for a growing population.“The study relies on computer simulations that apply blanket practices over the watershed, which is unrealistic and impractical. The study did not take into account current adoption of conservation practices or the fact that some practices work best in certain geographies. In order to achieve real success, farmers need to be able to customize their conservation choices to what fits best for their farm. Farming is not a one-size-fits-all practice.“With support from farmers, Ohio has adopted unprecedented mandatory policies, such as a fertilizer applicators’ licensing program, and is leading the country through cooperation among stakeholders and a proactive approach toward tackling this challenge.“A survey of Ohio grain farmers shows an 88% increase in farmers adopting grid sampling to test their soil and a 184% increase in the awareness and adoption of the 4Rs of nutrient management (right source, right rate, right time, right place) in only the past two years. Farmers currently implement multiple practices on their farms, yet the scenarios in the study only account for a few of the options available.“Through the hands-on work of Dr. Elizabeth Dayton, a researcher with OSU, we are gaining invaluable insights from real farms that take all practices into account. Her research shows that farmers are taking the right first step, and there is tremendous opportunity to make additional voluntary changes that will reduce runoff.“Sustainability is more than just environmental quality. It’s about finding the right balance of environment, economics and a reliable food supply. We need to take a measured approach to solving this challenge and not waste time and resources on studies that do not yield information that is applicable to real farms. It is also foolish to recommend policy changes without on-farm data.We all share the same goal of reducing the impact of runoff on Lake Erie. Farmers have repeatedly shown through their actions and their funding priorities that they are focused on this issue. Research, modeling, and asking the right questions can lead to solutions, but it must be based on the changing conditions that challenge farmers every single day.“Ohio grain farmers will continue to champion reasonable and responsible solutions to preserve and improve water quality.”last_img read more

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Ohio Soybean Association names Kirk Merritt executive director

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first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Kirk MerrittThe Ohio Soybean Association (OSA) has named Kirk Merritt Executive Director of the grassroots policy and member-driven organization to begin March 6. Merritt currently serves as the Executive Director of the Ohio Soybean Council (OSC), which manages soybean checkoff dollars, and will continue in that role.The announcement follows the departure of Adam Ward, who had served as OSA executive director and OSC director of marketing and outreach since 2010. Ward left the organizations to pursue an opportunity at The Ohio State University (OSU) as the Government Affairs Director for the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences.“We want to thank Adam for his dedication to our organization and his help in raising our level of recognition at the Statehouse and Washington, D.C. We look forward to working with him in his new role,” said Todd Hesterman, OSA president and Henry County soybean farmer. “To build on the progress made, we believe there is no better candidate than Kirk who has already been working with OSA and has done great work for OSC.”Merritt joined OSC in June 2007 as International Marketing Director and Director of Outreach and Programs for the Ohio Soybean Council Foundation (OSCF). In 2009 he was promoted to Executive Director of both organizations. He has worked closely with the OSC Board of Trustees to advance OSC’s mission of enhancing profit opportunities for Ohio soybean farmers. Prior to the Ohio soybean organizations, Merritt was the Director of the International Trade Division in the Ohio Department of Development leading a team with offices in Ohio and eleven international markets. Kirk holds a B.A. from Manchester University and a M.A. from OSU.Merritt looks forward to tackling his new role and keeping the missions of all three organizations, OSA, OSC and OSCF, in sync with the growing and changing agricultural industry.“Agriculture is an extremely exciting industry to be in right now,” Merritt said. “Technology is advancing and being adopted at a rapid rate. U.S. and international consumer demographics are changing. Legislative priorities and policies are in flux. I am looking forward to the challenge and can’t wait to get started. My first goal for OSA is to continue the good work that was done over the past several years and build on that for the future.”In addition to the change at the executive level, OSA and OSC are expected to announce and begin accepting applications for an additional staff position soon.last_img read more

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Lady Bulldogs seek share of lead; UP, TIP part ways

By on November 30, 2019

first_imgDon’t miss out on the latest news and information. Read Next MOST READ WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding Maroons nip Tigers on Desiderio triple; Archers escape BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF president Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC PH women’s volleyball team motivated to deliver in front of hometown crowd PLAY LIST 02:25PH women’s volleyball team motivated to deliver in front of hometown crowd00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients center_img View comments The Lady Stags are sporting a 1-1 record.Earlier at 4 p.m., University of the Philippines will attempt to score its first win in Group B when it takes on Technological Institute of the Philippines.The Lady Maroons, a perennial contender in the UAAP, bowed to the Adamson Lady Falcons, 17-25, 25-21, 19-25,25-19, 15-9, a week ago.On the same day, the TIP Lady Engineers lost to the San Beda Red Spikers, 13-25, 18-25, 27-25, 13-25.Every win counts in the Collegiate Conference, a single round robin tournament that will have the top two teams from the two groups clashing in the crossover semifinals.ADVERTISEMENT E.T. returns to earth, reunites with grown-up Elliott in new ad  NU and San Sebastian collide at 6:30 p.m. on Monday in the PVL Collegiate Conference at Filoil Flying V Centre in San Juan.Gorayeb, however, has already announced he will not show up, citing personal reasons. Assistant coach Clint Malazo will instead call the shots for the Lady Stags.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutThe Lady Bulldogs won their first game under Castillo, turning back the Lyceum Lady Pirates, 25-17, 25-16, 25-21, last Sept. 3.They will bank on Jaja Santiago anew when they try to grab a second win in as many starts and a share of the Group A lead with the idle Far Eastern U Lady Tamaraws. Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City LOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary National University is gunning for its second straight win against San Sebastian in the Premier Volleyball League on Monday but the backstory would be a lot more interesting.San Sebastian coach Roger Gorayeb used to handle NU, until he was replaced by Babes Castillo in the Lady Bulldogs’ camp.ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIESlast_img read more

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Usha sponsors the 31st Junior Training Programme of DGC

By on November 19, 2019

first_imgNew Delhi, May 16 (PTI) Usha International Limited, one of Indias leading household consumer durable brands, has been associated with the Junior Training Programme (JTP) of the Delhi Golf Club since 2006 with the aim of introducing golf to youngsters. The prgramme, targetting age groups of 8 and 17 years, is aimed at discovering and nurturing talented juniors. This years JTP is slated between May 15 and June 23. The 31st edition of the JTP is divided into four camps (each of 10 day duration) starting May 15, May 25, June 4 and June 14, respectively. Under the guidance of well-known A Category coaches, Vikram Sethi, Nonita Lall Qureshi, Anjali Chopra and Jasjit Singh, every participating kid will be trained on the basics of the sport. As per their ability and knowledge about the game, camps are divided into three levels of ability – advanced, intermediate and beginners. Speaking about the event, Komal Mehra, Events Head, Usha International said: “Usha is strongly committed to the development of golf in the country and thus continues to partner with the Junior Training Programme for golf with DGC for more than a decade now. “The success and popularity of this template has given rise to many similar programmes across the country. Designed to introduce children to the game of golf, as well as attract those who do not otherwise have access to a golf course, this programme is open to both members children as well as non- members.” PTI SSC SSClast_img read more

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Marijuana legalization may go more smoothly than you think Washington governor

By on October 13, 2019

first_imgVANCOUVER – Washington state Gov. Jay Inslee has a message of reassurance for Canadians who may fear that legalization of recreational marijuana next week will come with a wave of negative consequences: It’s not as bad as you think.Washington and Colorado became the first U.S. states to broadly legalize recreational marijuana in 2012 and Inslee says few of the concerns expressed at the time became a reality.“The decriminalization of marijuana by all ways of judging it, I believe, largely has been a success in the sense that the fears of those who were not supportive of our efforts really have not been realized,” Inslee told reporters at the Cascadia Innovation Corridor Conference in Vancouver on Wednesday.“We’ve not had crime associated with it, we’ve not had adverse health effects, there is not evidence of significant increase in youth usage.”However, there is still a need for more research on traffic related issues and the state has struggled with impaired driving, he said.While Washington has not documented any increase in traffic accidents tied to an increase in marijuana consumption, Inslee said it has seen a rise in chemicals in drivers’ blood streams including alcohol, amphetamines and barbiturates.“That has happened, but we haven’t seen it necessarily tied to marijuana,” he said.Recreational marijuana will be legalized across Canada on Oct. 17.Inslee recommended that the various levels of government have strong regulatory frameworks in place, including packaging rules that ensure consumers know exactly what they’re getting — especially when edibles become legal in the future.He said Washington benefited by issuing only as many production and retail licences as it could handle, compared with other states that issued unlimited licences and created a “Wild West” environment.British Columbia Premier John Horgan said his government has taken cues from Washington state including limiting the number of licensed outlets but said transitioning to legalization is a “challenge.”A number of existing dispensaries will have to go through the process of being licensed again, he said.“Many are very well on their way to becoming recertified or re-established but that’s going to take some time and I think I would appeal to the public for patience and also to the providers for patience,” Horgan said.Horgan said law enforcement is focused on how to best manage impaired driving and he’s hopeful that governments will have more answers for the public soon.“That’s been an issue right across the country. When I talk to other premiers, that’s the highest priority.”last_img read more

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Cops question man held with fake notes worth Rs 25 lakh

By on October 12, 2019

first_imgKolkata: The Special Task Force (STF) of Kolkata Police nabbed a Fake Indian Currency Note (FICN) racketeer on Thursday night near Sealdah railway station. He was carrying FICN worth Rs 2.5 lakh.According to sources, on Thursday afternoon sleuths got a tip-off that a person from Malda has reached Kolkata to deal in FICN. Working on the information members of anti-FICN team of the STF came to know that the suspect will come to Sealdah railway station area for the deal. Immediately, sleuths went to the area and started keeping strong vigil in and around the Sealdah railway station. Meanwhile, one of the official of the STF team got a call from his sources stating the location of the suspect. After being informed, the team rushed to the spot near Sealdah station and surrounded the suspect identified as Sahabul Shaikh of Kaliachak in Malda. During search sleuths found several Indian currency notes of Rs 2,000 denomination. Though it looked like original, sleuths had some doubts. Shaikh along with the notes was taken to the STF facility in Lalbazar. There sleuths checked the notes thoroughly and made sure that those are the fake ones. Shaikh was arrested immediately. After counting the money it was found that he was carrying 125 fake notes of Rs 2,000 denominations. Sleuths are interrogating him to nab the receiver of the fake notes.last_img read more

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Congress failed to develop North East Delhi Tiwari

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first_imgNew Delhi: BJP’s North East Delhi candidate Manoj Tiwari on Sunday held the Congress party responsible for failing to develop his constituency during its time in government, both in Delhi and at the Centre. Tiwari said that despite Delhi being the Capital of the country, governments prior to the Narendra Modi-led government have done nothing to develop North East Delhi.Other BJP candidates for the seven seats also had a field day launching scathing attacks at both the major opposition parties. At a public meeting in his constituency, South Delhi candidate Ramesh Bidhuri accused his AAP opponent Raghav Chadha of circulating fake news and trying to mislead people. Several of Tiwari’s public meetings were attended by former Congress leader Bhishm Sharma, who recently joined BJP. Sharma also leveled serious accusations against his old party. He said that after having been involved in politics for over 40 years, he was extremely disappointed to see his party try to ally with “an anti-national party” like AAP. Moreover, BJP’s Chandni Chowk candidate Harsh Vardhan also tore into Kejriwal for bringing up the full statehood demand for Delhi. While the incumbent MPs went about their campaigns, fresh entrant Gautam Gambhir got campaign help from Bhojpuri singer Pawan Singh, who addressed public meetings, seeking votes for the former cricketer.last_img read more

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What Were The Giants Thinking

By on September 28, 2019

Embed Code FiveThirtyEight More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed This week on the show, Hot Takedown analyzes the data behind the New York Giants’ controversial No. 6 pick in the NFL draft, Duke quarterback Daniel Jones. Todd McShay, an analyst for ESPN, is skeptical of Jones’s NFL potential based on his performance under pressure. While we agree that the stats don’t paint a bright future for Jones in the NFL, we disagree on how best to assess his prospects.For our second segment, ESPN NBA analyst and FiveThirtyEight contributor Kirk Goldsberry joins the team to discuss his new book, “SprawlBall: A Visual Tour of the New Era of the NBA.” Through detailed data visualizations, “SprawlBall” describes how the 3-point line has transformed the NBA and how it risks ruining the game’s future.In our Rabbit Hole of the Week, Geoff exposes his lifelong appreciation of (and poor betting record on) the Kentucky Derby. He explains the rationale behind voting for the favorite across sports and why he still won’t take his own advice.Here’s what we’re looking at this week:“SprawlBall: A Visual Tour of the New Era of the NBA” by Kirk Goldsberry, illustrated by Aaron Dana.Patrik Stefan’s epic miss that broke Neil’s heart.FiveThirtyEight’s Josh Hermsmeyer devised a metric for projecting college quarterback success in the NFL.ProFootballFocus’s analysis of Duke’s Daniel Jones ahead of the draft. read more

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