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‘All he had to do was change his angle’ – Campese says modern players lack flair and understanding

By on June 18, 2021

first_imgTuesday Nov 24, 2020 ‘All he had to do was change his angle’ – Campese says modern players lack flair and understanding Outspoken Wallabies legend David Campese has said that rugby might have lost it’s flair factor, following Australia’s 15-15 Tri Nations draw with Argentina this past weekend. Campo touches on other topics too, such as the day the fearsome Jonah Lomu followed him around the field, and why.ADVERTISEMENTAfter Argentina upset the All Blacks, this past weekend’s clash was always going to be tight and as it turned out, the two sides couldn’t be separated on the scoresheet.The Wallabies did have a disallowed try though, from a flowing backline move that unfortunately for them ended with a Tom Banks forward pass.Campese felt that the pass could easily have been avoided, if winger Marika Koroibete had just read things better and come in off his wing on the angle, allowing Banks to make a much easier short pop pass, rather than needing to flick it wide under pressure.WATCH: All Blacks great praises emotional Matera moment with young Pumas fan“All the winger had to do was just change his angle to make it an easier pass,” he told Grant Nisbett and Justin Marshall on the new Playmakers podcast show.“It’s impossible under pressure [with] someone under pressure to throw a 10-meter pass.“But, because, for the last ten, fifteen years there’s none of us older guys been putting knowledge back into the younger guys, you can see that some of these guys are struggling in [a] position where they’re not really sure, to me that’s what I reckon, what their role is.”ADVERTISEMENTHe added that when he played, the coaches weren’t allowed near the field, meaning that players had to make decisions themselves.“Players should be able to make decisions… You should know what your role is. And I just think that we’ve lost that.”The 1991 Rugby World Cup winner went on to discuss the All Blacks, Jonah Lomu and a whole lot more.As a result of the draw, all three teams now sit on six points, with Argentina having a game in hand.ADVERTISEMENTCatch up on the full match highlights below: Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error See it to Believe it Related Articles 25 WEEKS AGO WATCH: Experts explain what actually happens… 26 WEEKS AGO WATCH: Leigh Halfpenny makes yet another… 26 WEEKS AGO Parisse alley-oop magic sets up brilliant… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedYou Won’t Believe What the World’s Most Beautiful Girl Looks Like TodayNueeyUrologists Stunned: Forget the Blue Pill, This “Fixes” Your EDSmart Life ReportsWrinkle Remedy Stuns TV Judges: Forget Surgery, Do This Once DailySmart Life ReportsIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier Living30+ Everyday Items With A Secret Hidden PurposeNueeyThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

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Shannon Group Plc heralds new beginning for region

By on June 4, 2021

first_imgPrint Twitter Previous articleEuroMillions winning ticket sold in IrelandNext articleSharma appeals €100m planning refusal Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie NewsShannon Group Plc heralds new beginning for regionBy Staff Reporter – September 20, 2014 679 Advertisement Emailcenter_img “The establishment of Ireland’s newest commercial semi-state company, The Shannon Group plc, is the beginning of a new direction for Shannon and the wider Atlantic Corridor area,” the Presidents of Ennis, Galway, Limerick and Shannon Chambers stated in response to its official establishment by the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport Paschal Donohoe on Friday, 5 September 2014.“While much has been written and said about the gains achieved to date at Shannon Airport since it was made independent, the real significance of the new corporate entity can only now be gleaned as its four pillars – Shannon Airport, Shannon Commercial Enterprises Limited, Shannon Heritage and the International Aviation Services Centre (ISAC) –  gain the legislative ability to frame and sanction their strategic and operational directions.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up “As highlighted in the recently released quarterly National Household Survey, the growing skew between the Dublin east coast area and the West of Ireland, which is pointing to an obvious lack of focus on balanced regional development in the country, needs to be addressed. The Shannon Group, with its remit for airport development, industry, tourism and property, can become the catalyst for better and stronger regional development and initiate much-needed change in how national economic activity is spread.“The Shannon Group starts out on a strong footing. Early gains and achievements in delivering increased air access and an air of certainty at Shannon Airport have instilled a confidence in the local and regional communities  – the general public, industry and tourism sectors – and similar early gains in the Group’s other operational areas will serve to qualify the overall benefits of the combined assets of the Group.“The official establishment of the Shannon Group now gives the board and management team clarity of purpose and a combined focus. We look forward to seeing the positive dividends that will emanate from their sphere of influence along the entire Atlantic corridor,” the Presidents concluded. Facebook Linkedin WhatsApplast_img read more

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Explainer: Inter-State Arrest, Transit Remand & Right To Legal Representation

By on May 26, 2021

first_imgKnow the LawExplainer: Inter-State Arrest, Transit Remand & Right To Legal Representation Radhika Roy21 Feb 2021 4:28 AMShare This – x The concepts of ‘transit remand’ and ‘norms for inter-state arrests’ are being widely discussed in the wake of the arrest of 21-year old climate activist Disha Ravi by the Delhi Police from her Bengaluru resident in the ‘toolkit’ case.Many legal experts have questioned the Ravi’s custody saying that it was not accompanied with a ‘transit remand order’ from Bengaluru and norms for…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?Login The concepts of ‘transit remand’ and ‘norms for inter-state arrests’ are being widely discussed in the wake of the arrest of 21-year old climate activist Disha Ravi by the Delhi Police from her Bengaluru resident in the ‘toolkit’ case.Many legal experts have questioned the Ravi’s custody saying that it was not accompanied with a ‘transit remand order’ from Bengaluru and norms for inter-state arrest were violated. The Delhi Commission for Women has taken suo moto cognizance of the issue in the wake of widespread criticism against Ravi’s arrest and remand.In this backdrop, this piece is an attempt to explain the concepts of ‘transit bail’ and the ‘guidelines for inter-state arrest’.What is a Transit Remand Order?In practical terms, ‘transit remand order’ means on order passed by a Judicial Magistrate remanding an arrested person to police custody for the purpose of his transit to another state. By issuing such a ‘transit remand order’, the local Magistrate certifies that the police personnel from the outside state had the authority to arrest the person, and that such arrest was done legally. Further, the local Magistrate authorizes the other-state police to take the arrestee out of his home state.’Transit remand order’ acts as a valuable layer of protection in cases where a person is taken out of his familiar circumstances to an alien place. While the term “transit remand order” is not categorically defined in Indian criminal law, it finds its roots in Section 167 of the Code of Criminal Procedure. Section 167 lays down the procedure when the investigation cannot be completed in 24 hours as fixed by Section 57 and requires the police officer to transmit to the nearest Jurisdictional Magistrate a copy of the entries in the diary relating to the case, The Magistrate in turn may authorise detention of the accused for a term not exceeding 15 days, and if he has no jurisdiction, then he may order the accused to be forwarded to a Magistrate having such jurisdiction.From the aforementioned provisions, it is evident that in order to retain an accused in custody for a period exceeding 24 hours, the order of the Jurisdictional Magistrate is required and, for that, the police officer needs to produce the accused as well as copies of the case diary. A good reference point to understand the importance of these requirements is the 2018 Delhi High Court decision in the case Gautam Navlakha vs Union of India, in which a bench comprising Justices Dr S Muralidhar and Vinod Goel quashed the transit remand order on the ground that the Magistrate did not follow the requirements of Section 167.. In 2019, a Division Bench of the Delhi High Court had reiterated the detailed suggestions of a Committee constituted by it and had stated that in cases of inter-state arrest, an “endeavour should be made to obtain transit remand after producing the arrestee before the nearest Magistrate unless exigencies of the situation warrant otherwise and the person can be produced before the Magistrate having jurisdiction of the case without infringing the mandate of Sections 56 and 57 of CrPC within 24 hours”(Sandeep Kumar v State, Justices Dr S Muralidhar and Talwant Singh). In a 2009 judgement, the Delhi High Court had astonishingly observed that the Gujarat Police had come all the way from Ahmedabad to Delhi, beyond their jurisdiction, did not seek any assistance from the local police and had whisked away the accused to Gujarat – “Such practice is obviously contrary to the police manuals and if such actions go unchecked, it will amount to condoning lawlessness by the police force. In a country governed by the rule of law, this is simply unacceptable”. Further, the Court had noted that by snatching away the accused from his parental home and home environment, there had been a blatant infringement of his rights and would render a mental scar which had the potential to never heal.The High Court observed that the Gujarat police was bound to produce the accused before the nearest Magistrate who was in Delhi.”Article 22 (2) of the Constitution prescribes that every person who is arrested and detained in custody shall be produced before the nearest magistrate within a period of twenty four hours of such arrest excluding the time necessary for the journey from the place of arrest to the court of the magistrate and no such person shall be detained in custody beyond the said period without the authority of the magistrate. Once, we have determined that the factum of picking up Shamim from Delhi amounted to his ‗arrest’ and detention in custody, albeit illegal, it became incumbent upon the officials of the Gujarat police to produce him before the nearest Magistrate within a period of 24 hours. The nearest Magistrate was located in Delhi, but, obviously, he was not produced before any such Magistrate in Delhi”, the HC observed in that case while ordering compensation for illegal arrest.In the 1964 case of RK Nabachandra Singh v. Manipur Administration, it had been observed by the Gauhati High Court that the police should produce the arrested person before the Magistrate if investigation cannot be completed within 24 hours.”Unless a police officer considers that he can complete the investigation within a period of 24 hours, it is his duty to produce the accused forthwith before a magistrate and he should not wait for 24 hours”, the High Court observed.The concept of ‘transit remand’, though  not expressly mentioned in the CrPC, flows from Section 167 of the CrPC and Article 22 of the Constitution of India, as per which a person cannot be detained by the police for over 24 hours without the authorization of a judicial magistrate. With the aim of ensuring protection of the personal liberty of an individual, the Courts have evolved the concept of ‘transit remand’ in cases where the person is sought to be taken out of state by police from a different states. In such cases, the person ought to be produced before the nearest Magistrate soon after the arrest, and ought to be taken out of the arrestee’s home state only on the strength of a ‘transit remand order’ issued by such Magistrate.Application of Judicial Mind In the 2012 case of Manubhai Ratilal Patel v. State of Gujarat, the Supreme Court had held that the act of directing remand of an accused was fundamentally a judicial function and while exercising this function, it was obligatory on the part of the Magistrate to “satisfy himself whether the materials placed before him justify such a remand”. Therefore, there lies a responsibility on the Magistrate to apply his mind and not pass an order of remand automatically or in a mechanical manner.  Guidelines for Inter-State Arrest In the aforementioned 2019 case(Sandeep Kumar v State), a division bench of Justices Dr S Muralidhar and Talwant Singh of the Delhi High Court had also directed for the implementation of guidelines that had been proposed by the Committee and pertained to protocol that must be followed by the police in the event of inter-state investigation or arrest. Relying on Sections 48, 77, 79 and 80 of the CrPC, the guidelines stated the following guidelines for inter-state arrest:1. The Police Officer after assignment of the case to him, must seek prior permission/sanction of the higher/superior officers in writing or on phone (in case of urgency) to go out of State/UT to carry out investigation. 2. In a case when the police officer decides to effect an arrest, he must set out the facts and record reasons in writing disclosing the satisfaction that arrest is necessary for the purpose of investigation. At first instance, he should move the Jurisdictional Magistrate to seek arrest/search warrants under Section 78 and 79 Cr PC except in emergent cases when the time taken is likely to result in escape of the accused or disappearance of incriminating evidence or the procurement of arrest/search warrant would defeat the purpose. The Police Officer must record reasons as to what were the compelling reasons to visit other State without getting arrest/search warrants. 3. Before proceeding outside the State, the police officer must make a comprehensive departure entry in the Daily Diary of his Police Station. It should contain names of the police officials and private individuals accompanying him; vehicle number; purpose of visit; specific place(s) to be visited; time and date of departure. 4. If the possible arrestee is a female, a lady police officer be made part of the team. The Police Officers should take their identity cards with them. All police officers in the team should be in uniform; bear accurate, visible and clear identification and name tags with their designations. 5. Before visiting the other State, the Police Officer must endeavour to establish contact with the local Police Station in whose jurisdiction he is to conduct the investigation. He must carry with him the translated copies of the Complaint/FIR and other documents in the language of the State which he intends to visit. 6. After reaching the destination, first of all, he should inform the concerned police station of the purpose of his visit to seek assistance and co-operation. The concerned SHO should provide/render all legal assistance to him. Entry to this effect must be made at the said police station. 7. After reaching the spot of investigation, search, if any should be strictly conducted in compliance of the procedure laid down u/s 100 Cr PC. All endeavour should be made to join independent public witnesses from the neighbourhood. In case of arrest, the police officer must follow the procedure u/s 41A and 41B and Section 50 and 51 Cr PC. The process of arrest carried out by the police must be in compliance with the guidelines given in DK Basu case (Supra) and the provisions of CrPC. 8. The arrested person must be given an opportunity to consult his lawyer before he is taken out of State. 9. While returning, the police officer must visit the local police station and cause an entry made in the Daily Diary specifying the name and address of the person(s) being taken out of the State; articles if any, recovered. The victim’s name be also indicated. 10. Endeavor should be made to obtain transit remand after producing the arrestee before the nearest Magistrate unless exigencies of the situation warrant otherwise and the person can be produced before the Magistrate having jurisdiction of the case without infringing the mandate of S. 56 and 57 of Cr.P.C. within 24 hours. 11. The magistrate before whom the arrestee is produced, must apply his mind to the facts of the case and should not grant transit remand mechanically. He must satisfy himself that there exists material in the form of entries in the case diary that justifies the prayer for transit remand. The act of directing remand of an accused is fundamentally a judicial decision. The magistrate does not act in executive capacity while ordering detention of the accused. He must ensure that requirements of S. 41 (l)(b) are satisfied. The police officer must send the case diary along with the remand report so that the magistrate can appreciate the factual scenario and apply his mind whether there is a warrant for police remand or justification for judicial remand or there is no need for any remand at all. The magistrate should briefly set out reasons for his decision. (Manubhai Ratilal Patel v. State of Gujarat, (2013) 1 SCC 314) 12. Another mandatory procedural requirement for the Magistrate considering a transit remand application is spelt out in Article 22 (1) of Constitution of India. This entitles the person arrested to be informed as soon as may be the grounds of such arrest. The Magistrate has to ensure that the arrested person is not denied the right to consult and to be defended by a legal practitioner of his choice. The Magistrate should ask the person arrested brought before him whether in fact he has been informed of the grounds of arrest and whether he requires to consult and be defended by any legal practitioner of his choice. (DK Basu, Supra) After the pronouncement of this judgment by the Hon’ble Supreme Court, new Sections 41A to 41D have been added to prevent unnecessary arrest and misuse of powers. Denying a person of his liberty is a serious matter. 13. In terms of S. 41C, control rooms be established in every district. Names and addresses of the persons arrested and designation of the Police Officers who made the arrest be displayed. Control Room at State level must collect details of the persons so arrested. 14. The police officer must record all the proceedings conducted by him at the spot and prepare an ‘arrest memo’ indicating time, date of arrest and name of the relation/friend to whom intimation of arrest has been given. It must reveal the reasons for arrest. 15. Since the arrestee is to be taken out of his State to a place away where he may not have any acquaintance, he may be permitted to take along with him (if possible), his family member/acquaintance to remain with him till he is produced before the jurisdictional Magistrate. Such family member would be able to arrange legal assistance for him. 16. The arrested person must be produced before the jurisdictional Magistrate at the earliest, in any case, not beyond 24 hours from the date of arrest excluding the journey time so that arrest of such person and his detention, if necessary, may be justified by a judicial order. The 24 hours period prescribed u/s 57 Cr PC is the outermost limit beyond which a person cannot be detained in police custody. It does not empower a police officer to keep a person in police station a minute longer than is necessary for the purpose of investigation and it does not give him an absolute right to keep a person till 24 hours. 17. On arrival at the police station, the police officer must make an arrival entry in the record and indicate the investigation carried out by him, the person arrested and the articles recovered. He should also inform his senior police officers/SHO concerned about it immediately. The superior Police Officer shall personally supervise such investigation. 18. The police officer should effect arrest u/s 41(l)(b) Cr PC only when he has reasonable suspicion and credible information. He must satisfy himself about the existence of the material to effect arrest. There must be definite facts or averments as distinguished from vague surmises or personal feelings. The materials before him must be sufficient to cause a bona-fide belief. He cannot take shelter under another person’s belief or judgment. He must affect arrest at his own risk and responsibility as the effect of illegal arrest could be commission of offence of wrongful confinement punishable u/s 342 IPC. Burden lies on the IO to satisfy the Court about his bona-fide. No arrest can be made because it is lawful for the police officer to do so. Denying a person of his liberty is a serious matter. 19. Medical examination soon after arrest to avoid possibility of physical torture during custody should be conducted. 20. The IO must maintain a complete and comprehensive case diary indicating the investigation carried out by him. 21. The log book of the vehicle used for transportation must be maintained and signed. The IO must indicate whether the vehicle was official or a private one; name of its driver and how and by whom it was arranged. Only official vehicle should be used for transportation to the extent possible. 22. At the time of recovery of the prosecutrix, the police officer, if he is satisfied that she is adult, should ascertain from her at the spot, whether she was present there with her free will. If the victim/prosecutrix is not willing to accompany the police officer or her relatives, the police officer must not exert force on the prosecutrix to take her away against her wishes. However, if the prosecutrix/victim of her own accord expresses willingness to accompany the police officer/relatives, her consent in writing should be obtained at the spot. 23. In case where the police officer finds the victim/prosecutrix to be a ‘minor’, soon after recovery, she should be produced before the local Child Welfare Committee for further decision regarding her custody. She must not be made to stay in the Police Station during night hours. 24. Statement of the prosecutrix u/s 164 Cr.P.C. must be recorded at the earliest. 25. MHA/Central Govt/Commissioner of Police must frame suitable guidelines for police officers to render all suitable assistance. The failure to adhere to the rules/guidelines should render the police officer liable for departmental action as well as contempt of the Court.26. The public prosecutor should provide required assistance to the police officer visiting his State at the time of seeking transit remand. 27. The MHA/State Government should circulate the Rules/Guidelines/Notifications etc from time to time to the Police officers in the State to create awareness. Periodically training should be provided to the Police Officers to sensitize them. 28. Instructions/Guidelines of similar nature should exist in all the States/UTs for speedy, smooth and effective inter-State investigation. 29. The delinquent Police Officer can be directed to pay compensation under the public law and by way of strict liability.30. If, in case of urgency or other considerations in the interest of investigation, it is not found feasible to inform the police station encompassing the jurisdiction of the search, seizure, arrest or investigation before the event, this should be done soon after the search, seizure, arrest etc. has been conducted. Right to Legal Representation Article 22(1) of the Constitution of India states that a person who is arrested shall not be denied the right to consult, and to be defended by, a legal practitioner of his choice. Therefore, this mandatory procedural requirement, reiterated by the Supreme Court in the 1997 case of DK Basu v. Union of India, entails that the person arrested has to not only be informed of the grounds of such arrest, but should also be asked by the Magistrate as to whether he/she requires to consult and be defended by his choice of lawyer.  In the 2018 case of Gautam Navlakha v. State (NCT of Delhi), it had been submitted by the State the “seriousness of the offence and the urgency of the situation” may lead to overlooking the requirements of law in letter and spirit. However, the Delhi High Court observed that in such cases, the concerned Magistrate would have to be satisfied with the explanation offered for non-compliance – “the departure from the mandatory requirement of the Constitution and the CrPC ought not to be lightly countenanced”. Moreover, mere representation by a legal aid lawyer, without ensuring whether accused had the opportunity to consult a lawyer of her own choice, will not satisfy the requirement of Art 22(1) of Constitution, the High Court ruled. The Court also held that the mere fact that there was a legal aid lawyer representing the accused will not satisfy the requirement of Article 22(1), if it was not an effective representation. The Court noted that the legal aid lawyer in that case had not made any submissions before the Magistrate issued the transit remand order, and therefore the representation was merely “cosmetic”.Two parapraphs from the judgment are worthy of being quoted here :”Turning to the order dated 28thAugust 2018 of the learned CMM in the present case, the Court finds that a duty lawyer empanelled pursuant to the Scheme of the National Legal Services Authority (“NALSA‟), the statutory body under theLegal Services AuthoritiesAct, 1987(LSAA), wasshown representing the person arrested, i.e. the present Petitioner. However, the Magistrate does not appear to have asked the arrested person,as mandated by Article 22 (1) of the Constitution whether he wasinformed about the grounds of arrest and whether he wish to consult and bedefended by a legal practitionerof his choice. This requirement does not get diluted one bit only because the proceedings are for transit remand”.”There is no mention of thelegal aid lawyer having been made any submission whatsoever. The learned CMM did not even think it necessary to record any such submission. It thus appears to the Court that the appearance of the Duty lawyer for the Petitioner was cosmetic and not in thetrue spirit of Article 22(1) of the Constitution read with Section 12 (g) of the LSA which guarantees free legal aid to every person in custody.”. Also Read : Explainer : What Is ‘Transit Anticipatory Bail’? When Can ‘Transit Bail’ Be Granted?   Next Storylast_img read more

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Partner Nations test new technology to improve information sharing

By on December 20, 2020

first_imgBy Dialogo April 09, 2014 It is a well-known fact that different countries in Central and South America and the Caribbean have been heavily affected by the scourge of transnational illicit trafficking for years. Guatemala, for example, serves as a transit country for 80 percent of the drugs trafficked through the Central America-Mexico corridor, according to U.S. counter drug experts. San Pedro Sula, Honduras, was named the most dangerous city in the world for the second year in a row in 2013, due to high homicide rates as a result of gang activity and a surge in arms trafficking, according to the Citizen Council for Public Security, Justice, and Peace, a Mexican think tank focusing on crime statistics from the Western Hemisphere. The region understands that unless it keeps working together to confront organized crime head on, it will be hard to move forward effectively. Technology is a primordial actor in making this possible, and the U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) together with its components, is a facilitator to make it all come together. There have been ongoing efforts to implement and improve the ways in which partner nations collaborate jointly and share information to stay one step ahead of organized crime. One such example is a recently developed technology called Regional Domain Awareness (RDA), designed by SOUTHCOM’s Science, Technology & Experimentation (ST&E) division in order to allow users to access a secure, virtual platform from which to share specific information from radar and sensor tracking devices with selected partner nations, all from an Internet connection anywhere in the world. Ricardo Arias, with SOUTHCOM’s Science, Technology and Experimentation (ST&E) Division, explained that the command secured more than $6 million from the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) to develop RDA as a Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD), a program that leverages existing and emerging technologies and introduces new operational concepts to solve important military problems. The system was presented to military and law enforcement personnel from Colombia, Guatemala, Honduras and Mexico from March 17-21. The purpose of the internet-based collaboration technology is to improve unclassified information sharing among nations cooperating to detect and disrupt illicit trafficking across regions. The Joint Interagency Task Force-South (JIATF-S) led the demonstration from its operations center in Key West, Florida, while representatives from U.S. Northern Command, U.S. Pacific Command, U.S. Africa Command, the Naval Research Laboratory, U.S. Department of Homeland Security, and U.S. Department of Transportation participated with military and law enforcement personnel in all four countries. “The goal of this demonstration was to assess RDA’s military utility,” said Juan Hurtado, SOUTHCOM’s Science and Technology Advisor. With RDA’s operational demonstration now completed and its assessment pending, Hurtado said a decision will soon be made about the technology’s future. “If the assessment determines the system offers military utility, SOUTHCOM will provide a recommendation for RDA to transition to a program of record within DOD,” he said. During the demonstration, simulations allowed participants in each country to keep a close eye on suspect sea and air traffic tracks and to share related information with each other using a new mechanism for counter illicit trafficking information sharing called the Cooperative Situational Information Integration (CSII) system. CSII is slated to be implemented for use in SOUTHCOM’s area of responsibility in the summer and was developed with the same architecture used for RDA. “Both technologies are extensions of previous work accomplished by SOUTHCOM’s ST&E Division,” said Arias. “While the focus of CSII is regional support to the counter illicit trafficking mission, RDA has a much broader scope – DOD wide and multi-mission. According to Arias, both RDA and CSII are big improvements to the information sharing tools that preceded them. “Before RDA and CSII, information sharing was bilateral, using non-integrated networks, which limited sharing among partner nations,” he said, adding that older tools did not allow countries to share their radar feeds with each other or to integrate data from different domains. “Let’s say you have a really good couple of air search radars and maritime radars,” Arias explained. “You have some good information, and you want to share it. You can select which radars and which sensors you want to share, and with whom.” Guatemala “The challenge we face is that information about illicit trafficking often reaches us too late,” said Eunice Mendizabal, Vice Minister of the Guatemalan Ministry of Government’s 5th Vice Ministry, in an interview with SOUTHCOM’s Public Affairs Office. In response to this challenge, Mendizabal said Guatemalan officials sought a mechanism that would give them direct access to information about regional illicit trafficking activities starting at their points of origin, thus giving their defense and security forces more time to prepare and respond. “We reached out to the (U.S.) Military Group, and we explained the reasons why we were seeking access to these (new) programs that would provide us with information about illicit trafficking in real time,” Mendizabal added. According to Colonel Arsenio Guillén, from the Guatemalan Ministry of Defense, having the demonstration in-country was important in allowing the Guatemalan team to learn how the system works and clarify any doubts on aspects that need improvement. “Implementing the new system will provide Guatemala the opportunity to have more precise and timely information available for proper decision making during joint operations to combat drug trafficking,” he said. “The immediate information exchange through instant messaging with system’s operators from other countries will allow us to increase our air space control capabilities against illegal flights used for drug trafficking. But mainly, it will bring us the opportunity to work jointly with other countries.” Though CSII expands the scope of information sharing among nations, like Guatemala and the other countries participating in the demonstration, Arias is quick to point out that unlike RDA, it is not a global information sharing tool. “We wanted to go beyond a regional approach,” Arias said, referring to CSII’s geographic focus, “so we pursued a separate path to develop the capability across geographic combatant commands.” Still, for Col. Guillén, the advantage of CSII is having greater amounts of information at their fingertips. “This will make things easier for our units during counter drug operations.”last_img read more

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Colombian Army Destroys Massive Cocaine Laboratory Operated by ELN

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first_imgSoldiers seized a kilo of cocaine, 15 kilograms of coca paste, 125 kilograms of caustic soda, 3,450 gallons of sulfuric acid, 1,125 gallons of fuel, and a generator among an array of supplies and equipment from the facility operated by the ELN’s Comuneros del Sur Front. The ELN is the country’s second-largest guerrilla group and uses narcotrafficking proceeds to fund its terrorist organization. Sword of Honor III is a continuation of Sword of Honor, which is a counterinsurgency effort launched by the Colombian Armed Forces in 2012 to confront and defeat illegal groups nationwide. Under the initiative, Soldiers combat terrorist attacks, dismantle landmines, and persuade guerrillas to demobilize and enroll in a government program that provides them with training so they can enter the workforce and rejoin civil society. Soldiers seized a kilo of cocaine, 15 kilograms of coca paste, 125 kilograms of caustic soda, 3,450 gallons of sulfuric acid, 1,125 gallons of fuel, and a generator among an array of supplies and equipment from the facility operated by the ELN’s Comuneros del Sur Front. The ELN is the country’s second-largest guerrilla group and uses narcotrafficking proceeds to fund its terrorist organization. Task Force Pegasus of the Colombian National Army’s Third Division recently destroyed a massive cocaine laboratory operated by the National Liberation Army (ELN) in the Department of Nariño. Troops were patrolling a rural area when they found the huge complex, which consisted of nine structures outfitted to produce tons of cocaine hydrochloride. By Dialogo May 07, 2015 The Army is asking residents to use free hotlines 146 and 147 to report any suspicious activity while it continues to combat violence and the trafficking of illicit goods nationwide. The Army didn’t immediately report whether Troops captured any suspects during the operation, which was part of the Sword of Honor III campaign. The Army didn’t immediately report whether Troops captured any suspects during the operation, which was part of the Sword of Honor III campaign. Sword of Honor III is a continuation of Sword of Honor, which is a counterinsurgency effort launched by the Colombian Armed Forces in 2012 to confront and defeat illegal groups nationwide. Under the initiative, Soldiers combat terrorist attacks, dismantle landmines, and persuade guerrillas to demobilize and enroll in a government program that provides them with training so they can enter the workforce and rejoin civil society. Task Force Pegasus of the Colombian National Army’s Third Division recently destroyed a massive cocaine laboratory operated by the National Liberation Army (ELN) in the Department of Nariño. Troops were patrolling a rural area when they found the huge complex, which consisted of nine structures outfitted to produce tons of cocaine hydrochloride. The Army is asking residents to use free hotlines 146 and 147 to report any suspicious activity while it continues to combat violence and the trafficking of illicit goods nationwide. Very good news (PERMANENTLY),last_img read more

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Indonesian dentists walk on tightrope as practices forced to close due to COVID-19

By on October 19, 2020

first_imgCandra Juniar Amiarno, a 38-year-old dentist living in East Jakarta, was forced to stop practicing after the COVID-19 outbreak hit the country in early March.“I was not allowed to practice by my mother because the risk for dentists was very high,” she told The Jakarta Post on Wednesday. “I’m honestly scared [to continue my dental practice during the outbreak].”As dozens of doctors and medical workers have been exposed and killed fighting the outbreak, dentists were also putting their lives on the line as the Indonesian Dentists Association (PDGI) announced that at least six dentists had died due to the pneumonia-like illness. Read also: Coronavirus found in air samples up to 4 meters from patientsHananto said most dentists had complied with the warning, adding that only 30 percent of all dentists in Jakarta were still practicing in hospitals to handle emergencies, such as oral bleeding and severe dental pain.While limiting dental practices is seen as necessary to ensure safety and curb transmissions, the policy has also caused dentists to lose their source of income.“[My income] has been severely affected, as fewer hours mean a smaller income,” Candra said.Pedestrians walk on a bridge in Jakarta on April 9. Jakarta has applied large-scale social restrictions, which will be enforced until midnight on April 24 and could be extended. (JP/ Seto Wardhana )Diana Kusriyanti, a 42-year-old dentist living in Tangerang, also said her monthly revenue had dropped by almost 90 percent.“My income has decreased while basic necessities have become more expensive. My mortgage and credit obligations cannot be fulfilled either,” she told the Post on Wednesday.Seeing the dire financial situation of dentists, Hananto advised doctors to be patient and start living frugally, reminding that the outbreak had also economically impacted workers in other industries.“I’ve closed my dental practice for more than three weeks now, so I’ve started living modestly and avoiding excess,” he said. “We will manage as long as we start managing our spending better and save money,”. “It is better than me insisting on opening up my dental practice and contracting the disease. If that happened, my family and I would regret that for life,”. He added.Hananto also said the inability to make payments had also affected many new dentists that had invested in new dental equipment and office space.He, however, noted that the government had issued a policy to extend loan payment deadlines for micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs) for up to one year to help them cope with the effects of the outbreak. Read also: Indonesia’s COVID-19 stimulus playbook explainedPresident Joko “Jokowi” Widodo said the new relaxation would apply to business loans worth up to Rp 10 billion (US$619,118), both from banks and non-bank institutions.“The association has also requested that postponement of installments as dentists are only treating emergency cases now,” Hananto said.He also reminded dentists still practicing to always wear  personal protective equipment (PPE), adding that the National Disaster Mitigation Agency (BNPB) and the COVID-19 task force had been donating PPE to the association.“Keep our families safe by not practicing for now. Hopefully, this COVID-19 outbreak will pass and we can practice as usual,” he said.As of Monday morning, the country had recorded 4,241 cases of COVID-19 with 373 fatalities and 359 recoveries, as published by the Health Ministry on its official website on emerging diseases, infeksiemerging.kemkes.go.id.Topics : PDGI chair Sri Hananto Seno said dental and oral examination left patients, dentists and assistants vulnerable to contracting the disease as they were exposed to droplets, which were the main method of transmission.“[The droplets] can end up on the clothes of dentists and assistants, which can cause transmission between them and other patients coming in for an examination,” Hananto told the Post on Thursday.Candra also said that using drills during a dental examination could spread very fine water particles in the air that could carry the coronavirus for up to three hours, requiring the whole dental examination room and equipment to be disinfected every 30 minutes.Minding the danger, the association has advised the public to only see dentists for emergency and serious dental problems during the outbreak. In the meantime, it also has urged dentists to reduce their hours, especially those above 60 years old.last_img read more

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Tidal Energy Today launches new mobile site

By on September 28, 2020

first_imgTidal Energy Today is pleased to announce the launch of a new mobile site which has been optimized for the best reader’s experience.As the trend of reading the news via smartphone devices continues to rise, surpassing even the usage of personal computers for the same purpose – Tidal Energy Today has set out to follow the trend by offering a new and improved version of its mobile site.Aside from providing you with faster access to the news – now easier to read with an improved font, the new mobile version has taken a more individual approach to the readers by offering the option to personalize the homepage based on your preferences.Also, browsing through older and related news became a lot easier as the embedded links can now take you to the relevant articles and sites with just a simple click.You can access the new version of the site at mobile.marineenergy.bizAnne Visser, Business Unit Manager at Navingo, the parent company of Tidal Energy Today, said: “The use of mobile devices to access Tidal Energy Today is increasing. Therefore, we are pleased to offer this improved format to our readers. It is now also possible to personalize the categories of the homepages based on your preferences, simply by changing the settings in the menu.”Tidal Energy Today’s team welcomes your comments regarding the new mobile version which you can send via [email protected]last_img read more

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