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Bush vetoes war funds bill

By on January 11, 2020

first_imgBush spent much of the day in Tampa, Fla., at MacDill Air Force Base, headquarters of the U.S. Central Command, which coordinates Iraq operations. While Bush did not directly address the Iraq spending bill there, he warned that an early exit from Iraq could turn that country into “a caldron of chaos.” Though Bush’s plan to veto the measure had been clear for nearly two months, Democratic leaders in Congress even in the final hours urged the president to change his mind. Even as the political stagecraft played out on both ends of Pennsylvania Avenue on Tuesday, there were signs that Republicans and Democrats might be able to compromise on establishing benchmarks for the Iraqi government to show progress. But it remained an open question whether broad agreement was possible within Congress, much less with the White House, about whether to insist on consequences if those benchmarks were not met. “There are a number of Republicans who do think that some kind of benchmarks, properly crafted, would actually be helpful,” said Sen. Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the Republican leader. Rep. Roy Blunt of Missouri, the Republican whip, did not reject the concept of establishing benchmarks but said any hard-and-fast timetables or deadlines would be resisted. “Our members will not accept restraint on the military,” Blunt said. Financing for the troops is likely to run out by June. With the Democrats still wrestling over what approach to take, some are discussing passing two bills, one to provide short-term financing for the troops and the other to deal with questions of Iraq policy. Throughout the day, Democrats lined up to deliver floor speeches marking the fourth anniversary of the president’s speech on the USS Abraham Lincoln aircraft carrier. At the front of the House chamber, Democrats positioned a blown-up photograph of Bush standing on the carrier deck on May 1, 2003. Aides to the president were openly angry about the reminders, and the Democrats’ unusual legislative signing ceremony. “It’s a trumped-up political stunt,” Dana Perino, the deputy White House press secretary, told reporters traveling aboard Air Force One. Others grumbled privately that Congress had sent plenty of bills to Bush without such pomp and circumstance. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! • AP Video: Bush Vetoes Troop Withdrawal BillWASHINGTON – President Bush vetoed a $124 billion war spending bill Tuesday, setting up a second round in his months-long battle with congressional Democrats who are determined to use the financing measure to force the White House to shift course in Iraq. The veto was only the second of Bush’s presidency. In a six-minute televised speech, Bush called the measure a “prescription for chaos and confusion,” and said, as he has for weeks, that he could not sign it because it contained timetables for troop withdrawal. “Setting a deadline for withdrawal is setting a date for failure, and that would be irresponsible,” Bush said. He said the measure would “impose impossible conditions on our commanders in combat” by forcing them to “take fighting directions from politicians 6,000 miles away in Washington, D.C.” The veto added new punctuation to a major war powers clash, with Democrats in Congress – buoyed by what they regard as a mandate in last November’s elections – seeking to force an end to the fighting in Iraq and the president working to defy what he regards as an incursion on his authority as commander in chief. Democrats concede they do not have enough votes to override the veto. But, speaking in the Capitol shortly after Bush’s remarks, the House speaker, Rep. Nancy Pelosi of California, and the Senate Democratic leader, Harry Reid of Nevada, said they would not be deterred in trying to bring the troops home. “If the president thinks by vetoing this bill he will stop us from working to change the direction of the war in Iraq, he is mistaken,” Reid said. “Now he has an obligation to explain his plan to responsibly end this war.” The fight began more than two months ago when Bush sent Congress his request for emergency financing for operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. The next chapter begins today, when congressional leaders are expected to meet Bush at the White House to open negotiations on a new bill. They are expected to look for ways to preserve the benchmarks for Iraqi progress that were included in the initial bill while eliminating the timetables for troop withdrawal that Bush has emphatically rejected. Several Republican leaders said Tuesday they were likely to support such benchmarks, and White House aides said Tuesday that Bush, who has supported goals and benchmarks for the Iraqi government, might back such a measure – but only if the benchmarks are non-binding. Bush issued the veto from the Oval Office at about 5:30 p.m., using a pen given to him by the father of a fallen Marine. It came just hours after Democrats had themselves staged an unusual signing ceremony in the Capitol, timed to coincide with the four-year anniversary of the so-called “mission accomplished” speech, when Bush stood on an aircraft carrier and declared major Iraq combat operations had ended. last_img read more

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Dedeaux’s Trojans reigned in baseball

By on December 29, 2019

first_img Dedeaux was a three-year letterman and starting shortstop at USC from 1933-35 and appeared in two games at shortstop for the 1935 Brooklyn Dodgers, going 1 for 4 with an RBI. Dedeaux also spearheaded the development of amateur baseball nationally and internationally. He was instrumental in bringing baseball to the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles as a demonstration sport and coached the silver medal-winning U.S. team. He also coached the U.S. amateur team that played in Tokyo in conjunction with the 1964 Olympics. “Rod not only was college baseball’s greatest coach, he was the sport’s and USC’s greatest ambassador,” said current USC baseball coach Mike Gillespie, an outfielder on Dedeaux’s 1961 national championship squad, in the release. “… All of us in the USC baseball program mourn his loss and send our heartfelt feelings and prayers to the Dedeaux family.” Away from baseball, Dedeaux served as president of Dart Transportation, Inc., a trucking firm that specializes in worldwide distribution. He founded the company in the 1930s. Dedeaux is survived by his wife, Helen, sons Justin and Terry and daughters Michele and Denise, and nine grandchildren, including current USC freshman first baseman/outfielder Adam Dedeaux. Funeral services for Dedeaux have not been announced. In lieu of flowers, the family has asked that donations be made to the Rod Dedeaux Foundation, which promotes amateur athletics, at 1430 So. Eastman Ave., Los Angeles 90023. At the same time UCLA’s basketball team and USC’s football team were dominating their respective sports in the 1960’s and 1970’s, one could make the argument the greatest Los Angeles dynasty of them all was operating quietly and efficiently far beyond those glaring lights. The USC baseball team under Rod Dedeaux was every bit as dominating as Wooden’s basketball teams and McKay’s football teams, winning a record 11 NCAA championships and turning out a who’s who list of major-league stars. Dedeaux died Thursday in Glendale at the age of 91 from complications of a stroke that he had Dec. 2. “A giant has passed away,” said USC athletic director Mike Garrett in a school press release. Garrett was an outfielder for Dedeaux in 1965. “This is a tremendous loss to USC and the entire baseball community. It leaves a huge void in all of baseball.” Nearly 60 USC players under Dedeaux went on to big-league careers, including Mark McGwire, Randy Johnson, Tom Seaver, Dave Kingman, Fred Lynn and Roy Smalley. Dedeaux had a record of 1,332-571-11 the most wins in Division I history until Cliff Gustafson of Texas surpassed him in 1994 and had winning seasons in 41 of his 45 years with the Trojans. Under Dedeaux USC once went 37 years without a losing season. The Trojans’ national championships included five in a row from 1970-74. Dedeaux was named Coach of the Year six times by the American Baseball Coaches Association and was inducted into the organization’s Hall of Fame in 1970. Dedeaux was a three-year letterman and starting shortstop at USC from 1933-35 and appeared in two games at shortstop for the 1935 Brooklyn Dodgers, going 1 for 4 with an RBI. Dedeaux also spearheaded the development of amateur baseball nationally and internationally. He was instrumental in bringing baseball to the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles as a demonstration sport and coached the silver medal-winning U.S. team. He also coached the U.S. amateur team that played in Tokyo in conjunction with the 1964 Olympics. “Rod not only was college baseball’s greatest coach, he was the sport’s and USC’s greatest ambassador,” said current USC baseball coach Mike Gillespie, an outfielder on Dedeaux’s 1961 national championship squad, in the release. “… All of us in the USC baseball program mourn his loss and send our heartfelt feelings and prayers to the Dedeaux family.” Away from baseball, Dedeaux served as president of Dart Transportation, Inc., a trucking firm that specializes in worldwide distribution. He founded the company in the 1930s. Dedeaux is survived by his wife, Helen, sons Justin and Terry and daughters Michele and Denise, and nine grandchildren, including current USC freshman first baseman/outfielder Adam Dedeaux. Funeral services for Dedeaux have not been announced. In lieu of flowers, the family has asked that donations be made to the Rod Dedeaux Foundation, which promotes amateur athletics, at 1430 So. Eastman Ave., Los Angeles 90023. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECoach Doc Rivers a “fan” from way back of Jazz’s Jordan Clarkson Nearly 60 USC players under Dedeaux went on to big-league careers, including Mark McGwire, Randy Johnson, Tom Seaver, Dave Kingman, Fred Lynn and Roy Smalley. Dedeaux had a record of 1,332-571-11 the most wins in Division I history until Cliff Gustafson of Texas surpassed him in 1994 and had winning seasons in 41 of his 45 years with the Trojans. Under Dedeaux USC once went 37 years without a losing season. The Trojans’ national championships included five in a row from 1970-74. Dedeaux was named Coach of the Year six times by the American Baseball Coaches Association and was inducted into the organization’s Hall of Fame in 1970. At the same time UCLA’s basketball team and USC’s football team were dominating their respective sports in the 1960’s and 1970’s, one could make the argument the greatest Los Angeles dynasty of them all was operating quietly and efficiently far beyond those glaring lights. The USC baseball team under Rod Dedeaux was every bit as dominating as Wooden’s basketball teams and McKay’s football teams, winning a record 11 NCAA championships and turning out a who’s who list of major-league stars. center_img Dedeaux died Thursday in Glendale at the age of 91 from complications of a stroke that he had Dec. 2. “A giant has passed away,” said USC athletic director Mike Garrett in a school press release. Garrett was an outfielder for Dedeaux in 1965. “This is a tremendous loss to USC and the entire baseball community. It leaves a huge void in all of baseball.” last_img read more

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